#1
When putting together my practice session/ self-taught lessons, I've hit a hitch.

When it comes to learning chords around the neck, should I limit myself to just one chord a day? (Not just one position of course), then the next day be the scale around the neck... or should I combine a few things?

I know that's kinda on a per-person sort of thing, but what seems to be the most logical and pervasive form of this in most people's practice/lessons?
"grateful is he who plays with open fingers" - Me

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#2
There's nothing wrong with practicing as many chords as possible. It's only bad if you do so many that you can't practice properly or just don't remember.
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#3
its pretty much up to you, even a chord a day would get you glorious results if you were to learn one per day for a year, however dont just practice strumming them.

Concentrate on forming them in the air as many times as possible. All fingers should land at the same time and not walk aroung on the fretboard.

When reviweing already memorized chords, pay attention to their sound memorize it, and hear how they blend together. (if you have some theory knowledge it will be much more gratyfing though)
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#4
i could've swore the first line said 'hit a bitch'


ot: as long as it sticks, it's good, but eventually you should learn to construct/build chords and understand the function of each note, and learning chords will be much more efficient once you understand their make-up. so don't jump into learning the minor 11th add 37th chords without knowing how scales and chords function
modes are a social construct
#5
Well I mean, there is a general consensus about how chords should be learned... like a "syllabus" (so to speak) or something?
"grateful is he who plays with open fingers" - Me

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#6
learn your majors and minors, learn barre chords, learn your 7ths. at this point it's probably a good idea to start dissecting your chords and figuring out what makes them major/minor, what intervals do what, etc.
modes are a social construct
#7
Quote by Outside Octaves
When putting together my practice session/ self-taught lessons, I've hit a hitch.

When it comes to learning chords around the neck, should I limit myself to just one chord a day? (Not just one position of course), then the next day be the scale around the neck... or should I combine a few things?

I know that's kinda on a per-person sort of thing, but what seems to be the most logical and pervasive form of this in most people's practice/lessons?



Practice them how you'd use them.... in a key.

Learn the chords in a key as

- 1st position / open chords
- movable / barre chords


(1st as triads, then as 7th chords).


practice chord progressions in various keys.

With that foundation you can start including inversions, upper extensions and altered chords.
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