#1
Title says it all. Should I practice my sweeps with one hand at a time (all my other techniques i practice like this, and it seems to get me more acurate faster than doing them at the same time), or do sweeps have small nuances that need to be mastered together? if thats the case ill suck it up and go!
#2
Practicing the left hand alone (for sweeping) makes no sense, really, but practicing your right hand alone (by muting with the left hand, playing percussive notes) will indeed prove useful.
#3
The entire problem with any technique is making the two hands work together. Do both hands at once.
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#5
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#6
Don't do them individually; it'll be that much harder to sync up when you finally get around to it. It's a lot easier to do both at once and then identify which hand is having more trouble, then making up exercises that will challenge that hand to become better at its job (be it fretting, muting, or picking).
#8
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
Practicing the left hand alone (for sweeping) makes no sense, really, but practicing your right hand alone (by muting with the left hand, playing percussive notes) will indeed prove useful.


Jeez, I just can't agree with anyone on this forum...

DO practice your hands individually and together. ESPECIALLY your left hand. You need to get each finger down right as the last one lifts up in order for it to be clean. What I do is place my right hand on the fretboard to mute the strings and then completely hammer-on the other notes with my left like what Satch does in Mystical Potatoe. It's incredibly helpful for building finger independence. Doesn't workvery wellfor sweeps with rolls in them though. It's also good to practice just rest strokes with the right hand without notes. Metronome is essential for that.
#9
Quote by macashmack
Okay,
Also, how long do you think it wil take me to become good at sweeps?


Three months if you practice them right and every single day. By that I mean competently, not "In your face, Jason Becker. Look what I can do!" level.
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#10
Quote by macashmack
Okay,
Also, how long do you think it wil take me to become good at sweeps?

I have no idea. A while. Longer than you'd like.

Don't worry about meeting a deadline. Worry about having clean technique that has minimal tension. If you practice diligently, you'll get it eventually. The key is to worry about how you'll sound as opposed to how soon you'll have that sound.
#11
Quote by macashmack
Okay,
Also, how long do you think it wil take me to become good at sweeps?

Probably somewhere between a month and 5 years. It all depends on how much time you put in and how well you practice it. As others have said, don't practice your hands separately. It's best to synchronize them right from the start. Other than that, go slow. Take your time and work at it with a metronome and you will get it eventually. Good luck.
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#12
Quote by Junior#1
Probably somewhere between a month and 5 years. It all depends on how much time you put in and how well you practice it. As others have said, don't practice your hands separately. It's best to synchronize them right from the start. Other than that, go slow. Take your time and work at it with a metronome and you will get it eventually. Good luck.

Also depends how good your general technique is at the moment - if your picking's accurate and clean already then you shouldn't have too much trouble getting to grips with sweeping. However if you're technique is lacking and you're kinda sloppy then sweeping isn't going to happen until you rectify that.

Like the majority of the posts here, if you want to learn to sweep you have to use both hands at once, there is absolutely no point whatsoever "practicing" individually with sweeps. The hardest part of sweeping is keeping it clean and muting correctly, and there's no way whatsoever to tell if you're muting effectively unless both hands are involved.

The only reason you'd maybe need to practice hands individually is if your basic technique is lacking - and if that's the case you've got no business attempting sweeping anyway,
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#13
I practiced at least an hour a day and I got 3 string sweeps within a couple of days.
Practice with both hands with a metronome
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#14
Quote by steven seagull
Also depends how good your general technique is at the moment - if your picking's accurate and clean already then you shouldn't have too much trouble getting to grips with sweeping. However if you're technique is lacking and you're kinda sloppy then sweeping isn't going to happen until you rectify that.

Like the majority of the posts here, if you want to learn to sweep you have to use both hands at once, there is absolutely no point whatsoever "practicing" individually with sweeps. The hardest part of sweeping is keeping it clean and muting correctly, and there's no way whatsoever to tell if you're muting effectively unless both hands are involved.

The only reason you'd maybe need to practice hands individually is if your basic technique is lacking - and if that's the case you've got no business attempting sweeping anyway,


I'm telling you guys: separating those hands works. I'm curious as to wether any of you have actually tried it.
#15
I have. It didn't work as well as practicing them together. What happens with practicing both is that you're working on synchronization from the get-go as opposed to acquiring skill with both hands, but being unable to make them happen at the same time.
#16
Practicing with both hands at slow speeds and building it up is ten times better than seperating them at higher speeds then putting them together. With this method you can take on any sweep you like. Try seperating your hands on this.

e ---------------------------12-15-
B -----------------------12---------
G -------------------12-------------
D ---------------14----------------
A -----------14----------------------
E ---12-15-------------------------

Where is your God, now? <_<

The main part of sweep picking, and, indeed, most guitar techniques, is synchronisation between both hands. Your method may work for you, but that does not make it right.
#17
Quote by CelestialGuitar
Practicing with both hands at slow speeds and building it up is ten times better than seperating them at higher speeds then putting them together. With this method you can take on any sweep you like. Try seperating your hands on this.

e ---------------------------12-15-
B -----------------------12---------
G -------------------12-------------
D ---------------14----------------
A -----------14----------------------
E ---12-15-------------------------

Where is your God, now? <_<

The main part of sweep picking, and, indeed, most guitar techniques, is synchronisation between both hands. Your method may work for you, but that does not make it right.
I'm not saying you DON'T practice them together, I'm not saying to practice them at high speeds and then slow them down, and I specifically said it wouldn't work with that type of shape. However, from the left hand perspective, you HAVE to separate your notes in order to keep them clean. Doing something like a maj 7 or regular C shape arpeggio completely legato is great for getting your fingers used to lifting right as the next comes down. If you can do that, syncing up your right hand is fairly easy as long as your muting isn't trash (which is a whole other issue). And again, Mystical Potatoehead Groove Thang licks FTW.
#18
The Mystical Potatohead Groove Thang lick is a one handed arpeggio, so of course you're going to separate your hands for practicing it, on account of it only needing one of them.

However in terms of it's relevance to sweep picking it's arguably only slightly more releavnt than learning to play House of the Rising Sun.
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#19
Quote by steven seagull
The Mystical Potatohead Groove Thang lick is a one handed arpeggio, so of course you're going to separate your hands for practicing it, on account of it only needing one of them.

However in terms of it's relevance to sweep picking it's arguably only slightly more releavnt than learning to play House of the Rising Sun.


Okay, your logic for that first paragraph completely went over my head. Are you saying there's no point sweeping that lick simply because Satch doesn't? (actually he can sweep it, but that's besides the point). That shape is VERY sweepable. Your left hand does the exact same thing wether you are sweeping or hammering...maybe pressing a bit lighter for the sweep, but that's about it. Personally, when I see people screw up sweeping, it's because their notes are ringing together. I rarely hear open strings in there (that's what you mute).

Note separation=key to sweeping cleanly for most people
Legato arpeggios=specifically working on that

I can see people preferring one method over the other, but to discount one simply because it's not the standard bit of advice that everyone else gives is perplexing to me.
#20
Satch himself plays that arpeggio with his right hand muting the strings at the nut which effectively takes care of all muting duties...learning to play a one-handed legato arpeggio isn't going to help you learn to sweep, it might be the same note pattern but as far as technique goes its very different...on account of there being a whole other hand to worry about.
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#21
You don't literally practice them separate, as in only doing the right hand and then only doing the left. You should be playing with both hands together, however be focusing on the techniques of each hand separately, using various exercises. Check my YouTube channel in my signature for a lesson series "Learn how to sweep pick!" for discussion in greater detail with exactly the exercises you need.
#22
Quote by steven seagull
Satch himself plays that arpeggio with his right hand muting the strings at the nut which effectively takes care of all muting duties...learning to play a one-handed legato arpeggio isn't going to help you learn to sweep, it might be the same note pattern but as far as technique goes its very different...on account of there being a whole other hand to worry about.


The only difference is that you are picking one, and hammering the other. Your left hand moves in the exact same way for either one. How is that completely different?
And like I said before, I rarely hear people having muting problems. It's always separating the notes.

Also, to add a bit more evidence in favor of my argument, Paul Gilbert does exercises just like this for his right hand (separating the hands) and recommends them a lot. There are several YouTube vdeos where he discusses it. AND I've seen videos where Rusty Cooley recommends this as the very first thing you do when beginning sweeping.
#23
Quote by macashmack
Okay,
Also, how long do you think it wil take me to become good at sweeps?


Depends on so many factors

Based on your definition of "good", could be a week, could be never.

I stopped working on sweeping a while back, i felt string skipping and alternate picking offered a lot more options musically.
#24
Quote by WalkinDude91
The only difference is that you are picking one, and hammering the other. Your left hand moves in the exact same way for either one. How is that completely different?
And like I said before, I rarely hear people having muting problems. It's always separating the notes.

Also, to add a bit more evidence in favor of my argument, Paul Gilbert does exercises just like this for his right hand (separating the hands) and recommends them a lot. There are several YouTube vdeos where he discusses it. AND I've seen videos where Rusty Cooley recommends this as the very first thing you do when beginning sweeping.

To the bolded part, I say this - sweeping is simply a logical extension of muting technique. A lot of the difficulty I see people having is in the muting. People use hairbands as mutes because their muting technique is flawed. I don't know who you're listening to, but a lot of the issues I hear people having is the exact opposite. The rhythm is there, but the muting isn't.

As for separating the hands, the remainder of the problems I see folks having is from not having their hands synchronized. Their right and left hands are both developed well enough, but they are not able to synchronize the motions because they haven't practiced both hands together. In my mind, the hardest part of sweeping is getting the synchronization correct, since any mistake there is immediately and obviously audible. If you work on both hands at the same time, they'll naturally synchronize more easily than if they are worked separately.
#25
Quote by Geldin
To the bolded part, I say this - sweeping is simply a logical extension of muting technique. A lot of the difficulty I see people having is in the muting. People use hairbands as mutes because their muting technique is flawed. I don't know who you're listening to, but a lot of the issues I hear people having is the exact opposite. The rhythm is there, but the muting isn't.

As for separating the hands, the remainder of the problems I see folks having is from not having their hands synchronized. Their right and left hands are both developed well enough, but they are not able to synchronize the motions because they haven't practiced both hands together. In my mind, the hardest part of sweeping is getting the synchronization correct, since any mistake there is immediately and obviously audible. If you work on both hands at the same time, they'll naturally synchronize more easily than if they are worked separately.


Honestly, the only people I see who use hairbands only use them for crazy tapping licks. Daniel Gottardo, Guthrie, Andy James, Greg Howe, etc. I never see amateur players use them. Show me some examples of people sweeping and constantly hitting open strings. That is a result of muting problems. Generally, when I hear sloppy playing it is either synchronization or the notes bleeding together which are not muting-related. I don't disagree that synchronization is important (it's massively so). However if your problem is the notes bleeding or a muting problem, you can't say that individually looking at your hands is not effective. If you have a good ear, you hear that note bleeding all over the place because people suck at ascending hammer-ons.
#26
I see a lot of beginners use hairbands for muting when sweeping. there are guys who use them for tapping licks, but there are just as many whom I've seen use them for sweeping (Luke Hoskins from Protest the Hero comes to mind). Really, you don't need the hairband for tapping, either. I've done some pretty intensive tapping licks over multiple strings using a lot of fingers that I've been able to mute with my own two hands. Hell, Tosin Abasi, AJ Minette, and Dean Herrera have all done some pretty crazy tapping patterns that they pull off just fine time and again without needing a hairband to pull off.

Generally, when I hear sloppy playing it is either synchronization or the notes bleeding together which are not muting-related

Notes bleeding together is absolutely, 100% a muting problem. No way around it. If the notes are being sounded together when they aren't meant to is the definition of a muting problem.
#27
Quote by Geldin
I see a lot of beginners use hairbands for muting when sweeping. there are guys who use them for tapping licks, but there are just as many whom I've seen use them for sweeping (Luke Hoskins from Protest the Hero comes to mind). Really, you don't need the hairband for tapping, either. I've done some pretty intensive tapping licks over multiple strings using a lot of fingers that I've been able to mute with my own two hands. Hell, Tosin Abasi, AJ Minette, and Dean Herrera have all done some pretty crazy tapping patterns that they pull off just fine time and again without needing a hairband to pull off.


Notes bleeding together is absolutely, 100% a muting problem. No way around it. If the notes are being sounded together when they aren't meant to is the definition of a muting problem.


Well, I've seen a total of zero beginners use them. There is a distinction to be made between people who use them for recording purposes and people who actually rely on them for all of their muting. Anyway, **** hairbands; that's off-topic.

Personally, I look at muting as keeping notes that you aren't playing quiet. With the bleeding effect, you are technically playing the note, but holding it down too long. You can accidentally do the same thing on a piano, and that is not a "muting" problem. It's a different problem then simply keeping the open strings quiet with your left and right hands. But guess what helps to really isolate your finger independence in this area: legato 1 NPS patterns! So back to my main argument: isolating your hands (especially your left) is helpful when working on your sweeping especially if you have trouble with notes ringing together.
#28
Quote by WalkinDude91
Personally, I look at muting as keeping notes that you aren't playing quiet.

With the bleeding effect, you are technically playing the note, but holding it down too long.

You just contradicted yourself. Muting is keeping the notes from ringing out. When the notes bleed over, it's because you didn't mute the note. That's the definition of muting.
You can accidentally do the same thing on a piano, and that is not a "muting" problem.

You can indeed do the same thing on piano, but it's still a muting problem if it's unintentional. Muting technique is quite different on piano because the mechanics of sounding a note are different for the player, but failing to prevent a note from sounding is a failure to employ muting technique properly.
It's a different problem then simply keeping the open strings quiet with your left and right hands.

The above is exactly the same problem - notes you don't want to hear are ringing out because you didn't mute them. Whether you were fretting a note or not makes no difference at all. It's a note that shouldn't be ringing out. Thus, it's muting.
But guess what helps to really isolate your finger independence in this area: legato 1 NPS patterns! So back to my main argument: isolating your hands (especially your left) is helpful when working on your sweeping especially if you have trouble with notes ringing together.

Finger independence has nothing to do with this muting argument.

When sweeping, it's my experience that the fretting hand mutes the strings above the string you're fretting while the picking hand mutes those below. You can't practice the technique properly without practicing the muting, which requires both hands to do properly. Given that muting is the most important aspect of sweeping, it's absolutely essential that you practice it.
#29
You guys are arguing over semantics. You both seem to agree on the importance of muting each note after it's over and before you sweep the next note, one of you just doesn't want to call it muting. But this is definitely one of the huge factors in how clean your sweeps will sound when you speed them up, is how well you have practiced this technique of barely lifting your finger off the fretboard after playing each note to separate all your notes.

The method isn't to practice hands separate.. It's to practice them together, but so obnoxiously slow that it is very easy for you to stay on tempo. Use this opportunity to hone the techniques and economy of motion of both hands, then speed up once you are playing it at that speed and actually with good form (muting, economy of motion)

Again OP, I have a series of lessons in my channel going into detail about all of this.
#30
what i used to do is practice each hand seperatley then sync them up later.

basically, i use my right hand to mute up by the nut (yea i would stretch it over)
and then just legato the whole sweep. helped me with my accuracy on the left hand.
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#31
Quote by Geldin
You just contradicted yourself. Muting is keeping the notes from ringing out. When the notes bleed over, it's because you didn't mute the note. That's the definition of muting.

You can indeed do the same thing on piano, but it's still a muting problem if it's unintentional. Muting technique is quite different on piano because the mechanics of sounding a note are different for the player, but failing to prevent a note from sounding is a failure to employ muting technique properly.

The above is exactly the same problem - notes you don't want to hear are ringing out because you didn't mute them. Whether you were fretting a note or not makes no difference at all. It's a note that shouldn't be ringing out. Thus, it's muting.

Finger independence has nothing to do with this muting argument.

When sweeping, it's my experience that the fretting hand mutes the strings above the string you're fretting while the picking hand mutes those below. You can't practice the technique properly without practicing the muting, which requires both hands to do properly. Given that muting is the most important aspect of sweeping, it's absolutely essential that you practice it.


For ****'s sake, I'm not saying that you don't practice it. Your argument is that going the legato route serves no purpose whatsoever in regards to sweeping. I disagree that finger independence has nothing to do with muting of any kind because, again, YOU HAVE TO LIFT EACH FINGER AS THE NEXT COMES DOWN ON THE NEXT STRING. Fingers. Moving in different directions. Independently. By your logic, you can just hold down a chord shape, ascend a sweep, and have every note clean because your right hand is muting the lower string. It simply doesn't work like that for most people. Your hand has to roll with the sweep. Just like with the legato approach.

Again, I will reiterate my whole point:
It is a good idea to practice sweeps in as many ways as you can. EXCLUSIVELY practicing any idea one way and one way only does not always work. IF your problem with sweeping lies in the fact that your fretted notes ring together, regardless of how accurate your right hand is, isolating just your left hand MAY help you develop a more fluid left hand approach to sweeping. It does NOT mean that you can not just practice a sweep the normal way. In addition, if you can't play an arpeggio 100% clean in my recommended fashion, you have a problem with your left hand technique in some way.

The End.
#32
Quote by WalkinDude91
For ****'s sake, I'm not saying that you don't practice it. Your argument is that going the legato route serves no purpose whatsoever in regards to sweeping. I disagree that finger independence has nothing to do with muting of any kind because, again, YOU HAVE TO LIFT EACH FINGER AS THE NEXT COMES DOWN ON THE NEXT STRING. Fingers. Moving in different directions. Independently. By your logic, you can just hold down a chord shape, ascend a sweep, and have every note clean because your right hand is muting the lower string. It simply doesn't work like that for most people. Your hand has to roll with the sweep. Just like with the legato approach.

Again, I will reiterate my whole point:
It is a good idea to practice sweeps in as many ways as you can. EXCLUSIVELY practicing any idea one way and one way only does not always work. IF your problem with sweeping lies in the fact that your fretted notes ring together, regardless of how accurate your right hand is, isolating just your left hand MAY help you develop a more fluid left hand approach to sweeping. It does NOT mean that you can not just practice a sweep the normal way. In addition, if you can't play an arpeggio 100% clean in my recommended fashion, you have a problem with your left hand technique in some way.

The End.

Chill out. There's no need to get heated here.

I'm indeed making the argument that the legato route makes no sense because you'll almost never encounter a passage in which you'll fret the notes as if you were sweeping, but you weren't picking anything. It might happen once in a long while, but most people would probably just sweep it for ease and convenience. If you practice both hands at once, you're covering synchronization, muting, and the mechanics of both hands at once - that's something like killing four birds with one stone.

Like I said, muting requires both hands - the fretting hand for the upper strings, the picking hand for the lower strings. Isolating one hand may be effective when you notice significant weakness or instability in that hand, but you'd only realize that after practicing the technique pretty extensively. Usually, it's a matter of getting used to the sweeping motion and synchronizing that with the fretting motions. Having taught a number of students this technique, the mistake I see most often happens in synchronizing the hands, which leads to pretty major muting issues and a very profound lack of fluency in one's playing.

Believe me, I do understand the basic mechanics of sweeping - it's a technique I use regularly and have practiced pretty thoroughly. Check out my profile if you have any doubts (yes, I'm shameless about plugging my music).