#1
Perhaps, is it possible to have no rhythm?
I know scales, I can play them without looking. up and down pretty fast. Lack of knowing isnt the issue.
I cant write anything. I cant come up with any melody, or anything.
Maybe its something that can be worked on?
"A guitar is your personality expressed through six strings"

"I'm cuddly bitch, deal with it"
#2
Quote by Iblis92
Perhaps, is it possible to have no rhythm?

Yes. You've either got it, or you haven't. Sorry.
#4
Quote by Iblis92

I know scales, I can play them without looking. up and down pretty fast. Lack of knowing isnt the issue.


well, it seems to be part of the issue.

The other part is most likely a lack of experience playing Rhythm guitar.... like songs n stuff.
shred is gaudy music
#5
Quote by GuitarMunky
well, it seems to be part of the issue.

The other part is most likely a lack of experience playing Rhythm guitar.... like songs n stuff.


I'd agree with that. I dont know how to play many songs. in full anyway.
"A guitar is your personality expressed through six strings"

"I'm cuddly bitch, deal with it"
#6
learn some songs

quit running up and down scales

learn music by ear, not by tab. sheet music is excusable but be sure to work on your ear as much as you can.
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You win. I'm done here.
#7
Quote by Iblis92
Perhaps, is it possible to have no rhythm?
I know scales, I can play them without looking. up and down pretty fast. Lack of knowing isnt the issue.
I cant write anything. I cant come up with any melody, or anything.
Maybe its something that can be worked on?


Couple of different issues here.

RHythm is something you have to work on. That means practicing with a metronome, working hard to improve your innate sense of timing.

But I suspect the real problem here is your ear. It's hard to write a melody unless you can hear music pitch-accurately in your head. Develop your ear by transcribing songs, working with the free function ear trainer from miles.be, and working through a good ear-training book like Keith Wyatt's "Ear Training for the Contemporary Musician."

THe more you work on that, the more you'll find yourself being spontaneously able to APPLY your theory in musically interesting ways, like writing melodies.
#9
Quote by mdc
... et al.

You're slacking.


I get the impression half the people on this board don't know what that abbreviation means.

I really need to turn that recommendation into a macro, though, don't it?