#1
I have an Ibanez RG120 guitar, have had it a couple years. I bought it used off eBay, but it was in great shape when I got it. However, it was missing its original whammy bar when I got it and came with another one. Since the day I got the guitar, the whammy bar just slides into the hole but when I tilt the guitar forward the bar just falls out onto the ground. Nothing is holding it in. It's not a screw-in. So why does it fall out, and how can I fix this?

I brought my guitar to get tuned at my local guitar shop when I bought it. They told me there's a some kind of clamp/screw (or something) inside that can be tightened to hold the bar in. But when they tuned it they said there apparently was nothing inside the bridge to hold the tremolo bar in. I ordered a replacement Ibanez bar from Ibanez thinking maybe that would solve it, but it also falls out of the hole.

Obviously this sucks. What's the problem?
#3
is it a floyd rose type bridge or a fender strat style bridge?


if its a floyd copy then you could be missing the piece that the bar actually locks into


other than that it must be stripped
#4
There is a set screw in the side..... it's hidden, you have to know where it is. It may be there, you just don't know where. Or, perhaps, it could be missing or stripped. Try this, looking from the tail of the guitar, up at the bar, where the bar goes into the hole... do a dive, real hard, look for a hole with a small set screw.... I'll try to get a pic with my webcam and add it to this post. Other than that, if it's not this type.... I dunno.


Edit to add pic.


Last edited by IbanezBossShred at Feb 6, 2012,
#5
I never had any problems with Ibanez whammy bars falling but I have a cheap ESP-LTD which has a screw-on whammy bar and I can't use it live because it always flew away after few songs. It was always interesting though to see where it had landed after each show but otherwise useless like the whole guitar
#6
Which means one thing, yours was properly installed and tightened. Even an Ibanez whammy bar falls out if it isn't locked in. When you get them new from GC, they usually keep the bars out until they are sold, and then, they may or may not install it. Mine was in a case, so it wasn't installed. If I hadn't tightened it in myself, it would fall out. Sounds like the same thing with his. No biggie, he just needs to do it.
#7
Quote by IbanezBossShred
There is a set screw in the side..... it's hidden, you have to know where it is. It may be there, you just don't know where. Or, perhaps, it could be missing or stripped. Try this, looking from the tail of the guitar, up at the bar, where the bar goes into the hole... do a dive, real hard, look for a hole with a small set screw.... I'll try to get a pic with my webcam and add it to this post. Other than that, if it's not this type.... I dunno.

I have an RG120 (was my first guitar) and I can guarantee that there is no such screw within the bridge portion. It is a FAT10 non locking tremolo without fine tuners or any such things.

The simple reason that the bar keeps falling out, and I don't want to be super harsh, is because it's cheap. There is no lock to hold it in and, to be frank, it wasn't really designed to be utilized fully as a tremolo... maybe just for vibrato now and then, but that's kinda how it is. It just kinda sits in the guitar and wobbles around. This is a 200 dollar instrument after all, but still, I understand your concern. Mine does the same thing. It was tighter when I first had it but it would still fall out if I tipped the guitar over (and I have the bar that came with it). At the end of the day though, it isn't really even worth it to use the tremolo on the thing anyway as it isn't locking and is full floating... I ended up blocking mine and using it as my workhouse beat around guitar and it's a champ!
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Last edited by Krauser at Feb 6, 2012,
#8
^ Big fat +1 to that. I also owned an RG120, once upon a time.

If you want it to stay in place, you could try wrapping the bar with masking/painters tape.
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#9
Gravity.


Also, some of the Ibby's had teflon inserts for the tremolo bar that needed to be replaced as necessary. Yours may be one?
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#10
Quote by Krauser
I have an RG120 (was my first guitar) and I can guarantee that there is no such screw within the bridge portion. It is a FAT10 non locking tremolo without fine tuners or any such things.

The simple reason that the bar keeps falling out, and I don't want to be super harsh, is because it's cheap. There is no lock to hold it in and, to be frank, it wasn't really designed to be utilized fully as a tremolo... maybe just for vibrato now and then, but that's kinda how it is. It just kinda sits in the guitar and wobbles around. This is a 200 dollar instrument after all, but still, I understand your concern. Mine does the same thing. It was tighter when I first had it but it would still fall out if I tipped the guitar over (and I have the bar that came with it). At the end of the day though, it isn't really even worth it to use the tremolo on the thing anyway as it isn't locking and is full floating... I ended up blocking mine and using it as my workhouse beat around guitar and it's a champ!


Yes what you say makes sense, thanks! It isn't an expensive guitar, but you would think Ibanez could make the damn bar screw in or something lol! How much would that cost?

Ya the guitar goes out of tune very easily using the tremolo. Too bad, otherwise I really like the guitar. Nice thin Wizard neck and 24 frets and it looks bad ass. May be time soon for an upgrade then, maybe one with a locking system.
#11
Quote by Barricade_28
Yes what you say makes sense, thanks! It isn't an expensive guitar, but you would think Ibanez could make the damn bar screw in or something lol! How much would that cost?

Ya the guitar goes out of tune very easily using the tremolo. Too bad, otherwise I really like the guitar. Nice thin Wizard neck and 24 frets and it looks bad ass. May be time soon for an upgrade then, maybe one with a locking system.

It couldn't cost too much more but then again when I bought the guitar, even as a beginner I knew it was going to have a terrible trem system. The general rule of thumb is, if it's fully floating and non-locking, it's not meant to do anything other than some occasional vibrato. That's true for the RG120 too. If you notice, there isn't a huge range of motion that the trem can move in. For pull backs, there is no route in the body for the trem, so it will not move that far at all (mine practically sits on the body after setting the pole heights for the action) and it doesn't have much dive range at all. It's only really there, in my opinion, for some occasional vibrato. I don't know how much you use the trem but, to be honest, unless you frequently write music that is dependent upon dive bombs and squeals (a la Steve Vai, etc.) it's not worth the hassle to have a locking, full-floating tremolo. Even on my prestige, which has a locking floating trem (a ZR), I never use the tremolo arm (other than for vibrato) but like the fine-tuning and easy intonation adjustments. Ideally, I'd get a guitar with a locking trem system and block it. For me, that's the best of both worlds. But at the end of the day, if you don't frequently use the tremolo, it usually isn't worth it to have one. The convenience of a hardtail is excellent (for example I always throw my RG2EX1 from Drop C to B standard with ease). It's up to you... but weigh how often you'd actually use it. It's often a lot less than you'd assume...

As for the RG120, I'd block it. It's more hassle than it's worth, even without using the tremolo (tuning stability, notes going out of tune in double bends, etc.). It's very easy and there are more than enough helpful pages online to show you how. I made a block out of a cut up wooden ruler that I wood glued together... legit... it's mad simply. Just find some wood in the proper thickness and stick it between the trem and the body in the cavity behind the back plate on both sides... and voila.
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Last edited by Krauser at Feb 8, 2012,
#12
Quote by Krauser
It couldn't cost too much more but then again when I bought the guitar, even as a beginner I knew it was going to have a terrible trem system. The general rule of thumb is, if it's fully floating and non-locking, it's not meant to do anything other than some occasional vibrato. That's true for the RG120 too. If you notice, there isn't a huge range of motion that the trem can move in. For pull backs, there is no route in the body for the trem, so it will not move that far at all (mine practically sits on the body after setting the pole heights for the action) and it doesn't have much dive range at all. It's only really there, in my opinion, for some occasional vibrato. I don't know how much you use the trem but, to be honest, unless you frequently write music that is dependent upon dive bombs and squeals (a la Steve Vai, etc.) it's not worth the hassle to have a locking, full-floating tremolo. Even on my prestige, which has a locking floating trem (a ZR), I never use the tremolo arm (other than for vibrato) but like the fine-tuning and easy intonation adjustments. Ideally, I'd get a guitar with a locking trem system and block it. For me, that's the best of both worlds. But at the end of the day, if you don't frequently use the tremolo, it usually isn't worth it to have one. The convenience of a hardtail is excellent (for example I always throw my RG2EX1 from Drop C to B standard with ease). It's up to you... but weigh how often you'd actually use it. It's often a lot less than you'd assume...

As for the RG120, I'd block it. It's more hassle than it's worth, even without using the tremolo (tuning stability, notes going out of tune in double bends, etc.). It's very easy and there are more than enough helpful pages online to show you how. I made a block out of a cut up wooden ruler that I wood glued together... legit... it's mad simply. Just find some wood in the proper thickness and stick it between the trem and the body in the cavity behind the back plate on both sides... and voila.


Thanks for your advice again. Yes, this was my first guitar and I wanted a tremolo bar of course. But you're right, I don't use it as much as I thought I would. But I do use it for once in awhile for some nutty divebombs. I'd love to learn how to use the trem for vibrato like Neil Young does, he uses the trem so much!

I find if you lean back on the bar so the floating trem hits the body of the guitar (make your string pitch go up) that does a pretty good job of putting the strings back in tune, but it's still annoying. I don't use the trem too much for vibrato. I'm thinking of getting a guitar with a fixed bridge for sure (or look into blocking my RG120), as I unfortunately can't be bothered to fool around much with drop D/open D tunings etc. right now plus double-string bends etc. It's also a pain in the ASS to tune the thing at all with the floating system. Ideally I'd like to one day own one guitar with a floyd rose locking trem, and another guitar with a fixed bridge, best of both worlds.