#1
I've posted multiple times in the forums about an intonation problem, but I'm pretty stumped at this point. Lately, I've noticed that the G string (or D#, considering I'm playing in C-standard) on my Schecter (Damien Elite) won't intonate properly. It's not that I can't intonate it at the 12th fret, it's that the notes are sharp on all the frets before the 12th and flat on all the frets after. I've tried various combinations of possible solutions, but to no avail:
.New nut (almost impossible to find one for my particular guitar)
.Adjusting the truss rod (I noticed the neck was bowed forward quite a bit)
.New strings (from 54-11s, I think, to 56-10s)
.Stretching the strings.

I really don't know what I can do at this point, as this has been a problem across both string changes. Please help, I haven't played in a couple of weeks and I'm stressing out
#2
It's the G string. It happens. The G string is the hardest one to get sounding correct. Some guitars have no issue with it, but most of them seem to have some kind of issue with the G string. Every one of mine has a finicky G string. It's an odd gauge that could be either a wound or plain string and work well. At this point you can try a wound string for your G, but I can't think of much else to do that you haven't already tried. Of course a wound G will sound and play differently.
#3
Quote by poppameth
It's the G string. It happens. The G string is the hardest one to get sounding correct. Some guitars have no issue with it, but most of them seem to have some kind of issue with the G string. Every one of mine has a finicky G string. It's an odd gauge that could be either a wound or plain string and work well. At this point you can try a wound string for your G, but I can't think of much else to do that you haven't already tried. Of course a wound G will sound and play differently.

Yeah, I've noticed the G string can be troublesome. I just thought it was weird that both sets had the same problem, but I guess it's because they're plain, like you said. Thanks for the help
#4
How are you intonating? New strings first of all and doing it by ear can be less than accurate. Chromatic tuners are't as accurate as strobe tuners. Also, pressure when striking notes, they should be about the same as you play. Then there's attack/dwell. Note that if you tend to let notes ring out it should be intonated to the dwell or note after attack. Fast pcikers would tune to the initial note or attack.
I prefer Dan Erlewine's method over the harmonic method and find the guitar is generally in tune overall with DE's method (open string to fretted 12th).
Moving on.....