#1
been playing guitar for bout 2 years, have been interested in improvising for a while now i havent really went out n learned abunch of licks from others other then some stuff i tried to learn by listening to a couple of my fav artists,


but some tips someone told me on UG before was to try n "Make ur own licks" so thats kinda how ive been doing it

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nL9f7Pm6BVY&feature=share
(as in this video of me playing halo theme with improvised solo)

would like to hear more tips on improvising, phrasing and alittle bit of shredding techniques or a recommended online instructor for instrumental rock/fusion/blues style
"its not the destination.... so much as the journey" one once said
Last edited by Marqway at Feb 6, 2012,
#3
^+1. Also, experiment with time. Not time signatures, but note values. Restrict yourself to one type until you run out of ideas, then move on to the next.
#4
Quote by jayx124
this advise helped me a lot - scat what you play, at first you will probably not hit many notes but the more you practice and your ears get better you will be able to play what you hear. beside that singing while improv really helps with the rhythmic part of the phrasing.

+1

Sounds ridiculously obvious, but if it sounds crap when you sing it, it's probably going to sound crap when you play it on the guitar.
Actually called Mark!

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#5
I was once told:

'what you don't play is more important than what you do play'

This really helped improve my improvising. Instead of filling every beat of every bar, just small short phrases made a much more exciting and original sounding improvised solo
#7
I'd would say first thing to do is LISTEN TO LOTS OF MUSIC!!!!!
Especially the sort of music you want to learn to play.
This really is the key - you need to know what the sounds are. The language as it were. You need these sounds to be inside your mind.

Transcribe some easy solos by ear and analyse them in terms of their melodic ideas/motifs, themes and variations, repetitions etc.
Make your own original licks - try to make at least one a day and stick it in a notebook. This will help you develop your own style.

Learn as much theory as you can. Chords, scales, sight reading all this good stuff.

Phrasing is much more difficult. Listen to how your favourite players phrase. Imitate and then innovate.
Think about what you just played, leave a gap and try to hear what the answer is to te thing you just played. It needs to flow........
There's so much to it, but have fun with it!

Technique is a matter of practice. Lots of practice. There are millions of tutorials out there. Some good, some bad. Try to work on all aspects of technique, but try to identify which ones are more relevant to the style of music you wish to make.
For example, don't spend too much time trying to 8 finger tap if you want to play finger-style jazz.

The main thing you need to do is LISTEN imho.
#8
Quote by geo1450
I was once told:

'what you don't play is more important than what you do play'

This really helped improve my improvising. Instead of filling every beat of every bar, just small short phrases made a much more exciting and original sounding improvised solo


I don't like the wording of that quote, but I do very much like the message it sends.
Space is so very important. Pretty much every one I hear who isn't quite there with their improv plays waaaaaayy too much!
Like they have spunked their entire bag in one phrase and left nothing in the tank for the further 3 choruses left to do!

I know I've done this in the past and sometimes still do - sometimes I have to say to myself 'Dude, what are you doing?.....'
#9
Quote by Matt.Guitar
I'd would say first thing to do is LISTEN TO LOTS OF MUSIC!!!!!
.


Now when u say that, Do u mean , Listen to music as much as possible, or Listen to many different (artist,genres) etc.
"its not the destination.... so much as the journey" one once said
#10
Or both?
"its not the destination.... so much as the journey" one once said
#11
Quote by z4twenny
^ i always say that its not about the notes but the space beyween the notes


i disagree. that makes you focus on not playing, rather than focus on playing.

it's ABSOLUTELY about the notes. good phrasing isn't about not playing -- it's just that silence makes the lines we do play seem stronger. it adds contrast. so rather than focusing on taking a breath, focus on playing, and use breaks where it would help the coherence and effect of your musical statement overall.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#12
Quote by AeolianWolf
i disagree. that makes you focus on not playing, rather than focus on playing.

it's ABSOLUTELY about the notes. good phrasing isn't about not playing -- it's just that silence makes the lines we do play seem stronger. it adds contrast. so rather than focusing on taking a breath, focus on playing, and use breaks where it would help the coherence and effect of your musical statement overall.

You mistake what i mean i think. The idea is more that rhythmically interesting phrases have differing note spacings. If you just run eight notes it can get boring afrer a minute. As for the notes, i mean you know that the notes don't intrinsically matter it's the relationships between the notes thats important. Like looking at it functionally, root to fifth instead of c to g.
#13
Quote by z4twenny
You mistake what i mean i think. The idea is more that rhythmically interesting phrases have differing note spacings. If you just run eight notes it can get boring afrer a minute. As for the notes, i mean you know that the notes don't intrinsically matter it's the relationships between the notes thats important. Like looking at it functionally, root to fifth instead of c to g.


oh, no. i know exactly what you mean. but someone who came here to learn about it might not. i'm criticizing your word choice, mostly. saying "rhythmically interesting phrases have differing note spacings" is different from saying "it's not about the notes, but the space between the notes".

i'm saying i don't believe in that "what you don't play" nonsense. it's not about what you don't play; it's about what you play. if you focus on what you don't play, your endgame is ultimately shifted from where you wanted it to be. taking a rest should only serve to better the melodic line as a whole, as should any improvisational/compositional technique.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#14
do any of u guys have any vids of u improvising, id like to hear ,from another guitarist perspective
"its not the destination.... so much as the journey" one once said
#15
Quote by Marqway
do any of u guys have any vids of u improvising, id like to hear ,from another guitarist perspective

Every solo on every song in my profile is pretty much a 1 take (a couple of them are 2 or 3 one takes put together) unfortunately no vids
#16
Quote by AeolianWolf
oh, no. i know exactly what you mean. but someone who came here to learn about it might not. i'm criticizing your word choice, mostly. saying "rhythmically interesting phrases have differing note spacings" is different from saying "it's not about the notes, but the space between the notes".

i'm saying i don't believe in that "what you don't play" nonsense. it's not about what you don't play; it's about what you play. if you focus on what you don't play, your endgame is ultimately shifted from where you wanted it to be. taking a rest should only serve to better the melodic line as a whole, as should any improvisational/compositional technique.

So while the idea when explained is fine with you, you don't like the summation?

And i never said anything about the notes you don't play, i figure they're irrelevent since you don't play them.
#18
Quote by z4twenny
So while the idea when explained is fine with you, you don't like the summation?

And i never said anything about the notes you don't play, i figure they're irrelevent since you don't play them.


now i think YOU don't understand what I mean.

take some time and rethink it.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#19
Quote by geo1450
I was once told:

'what you don't play is more important than what you do play'

This really helped improve my improvising. Instead of filling every beat of every bar, just small short phrases made a much more exciting and original sounding improvised solo

I couldn't agree more.
#20
Quote by AeolianWolf
now i think YOU don't understand what I mean.

take some time and rethink it.

Rethink what? I'll need you to throw out something showing my fallacy
#21
Quote by Matt.Guitar
I'd would say first thing to do is LISTEN TO LOTS OF MUSIC!!!!!


I agree with this, especially live music, wherever you can find it, concerts, pub's etc.
Different musicians will approach improvising in a different way, so go see some 'pub' bands or artists, watch and listen and ask them how they approach improvising, you may get some good ideas off them.

Last night I saw Terry Lightfoot and his quartet in a a local pub, he's a highly regarded jazz clarinetist, and listening to him, when improvising, he doesn't play much, but what he does play is very interesting in its placing in the bar, i.e.what beat he starts the phrase on, how long the phrase is etc.
#22
When I advise people - my students on improvising I use a lot of idea generators:

1. Call and Response
2. Variations on a theme
3. Rhythmic duration, imitation and articulation
4. Understanding/ and recognizing which notes cause tension and resolution and why/where
5. Ending phrasing intentionally
6. Analyzing solos, melodies or lines which move them so they can learn from tendencies they respond towards, and using those in an abstract form, yet with understanding in their own playing. (For example, I found that melodically I love when a 4 to 3 to 1 "move" is in a melody. i.e a sus4 kind of line). I love the sound when I start a line at the 9th and move it to the 7 and then the 1 for a gradual tension to resolution, opening.

Best,

Sean