#1
before I couldnt care less about the Melodic minor but ill admit now
I am interested in learning this scale after I heard someone improvising using the Melodic minor scale

Then as I was listening closely to the solo it sounded alittle andy timmons like, and I thought that it did sound like Guthrie Govan alittle bit so was just wondering if they use that scale, if so then I will be learning this scale
"its not the destination.... so much as the journey" one once said
Last edited by Marqway at Feb 7, 2012,
#3
haven't we told you at least once by now?

learn all the notes on the fretboard

learn how the major and minor scales work, and how to build chords

learn how to use accidentals

then you can worry about obscure scales, but you'll probably find you don't care and won't even think in scales once you can make the notes speak for themselves.

don't play scales, play your instrument.
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#4
They do not endorse the melodic minor scale. It is not one of their approved sponsors.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#5
In the regard of using a natural minor scale with an accidental major sixth and raised seventh for colour - yes.

What sort of method do you plan on endorsing for learning this scale if you decide to go down that route? It's far more beneficial to understand the practicalities and influence of intervallic systems and those intervals themselves in a harmonic context, rather than to learn fingerboard positions under a certain name that happen to lock you into using those same intervals.
Last edited by juckfush at Feb 7, 2012,
#6
lol school was not my subject , so theory for me is like = blah taking classes , luckily for me its about music which is why i learn some theory here n there but seriously my mentallity is .... Shut up and Play
"its not the destination.... so much as the journey" one once said
Last edited by Marqway at Feb 7, 2012,
#8
Quote by Marqway
lol school was not my subject , so theory for me is like = blah taking classes , luckily for me its about music which is why i learn some theory here n there but seriously my mentallity is .... Shut up and Play


there's not a grey area between 'wanting to know theory' and 'not wanting to know theory'. the way i see it, learning shapes and scales is your way of saying 'i want to learn theory but i don't want to put in the effort'

if you were content with just playing, you would just be playing instead of posting questions you could have easily answered yourself.
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#9
Quote by Marqway
lol school was not my subject , so theory for me is like = blah taking classes , luckily for me its about music which is why i learn some theory here n there but seriously my mentallity is .... Shut up and Play


Well in that case.....shut up and play.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#10
Quote by AlanHB
Well in that case.....shut up and play.

mdc likes this.
#11
You could also sound like Bach, or Wes Montgomery, or just about whoever, using the construct of "the melodic minor scale". There's no simple formula of a scale that's going to make you sound like a certain musician - especially a really good one.

Also, in the vast majority of cases, "the melodic minor scale" (as well as "the harmonic minor scale") isn't used as a scale, but an in-context, in-passing usage of chromaticism in a minor key.

If your first intuition is to sit down and carve something out of "the melodic minor scale" as a framework or formula for the music, as if the scale was functionally the key signature, you likely don't sufficiently understand it yet.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Feb 7, 2012,
#12
The MM is beautiful and is a must know scale from jazz and fusion, it's main purpose is to target altered notes on Dom7 chords. You need to distinguish between the Dom7 chord which resolves to the I and a Dom7 chord which does not.
if the Dom7 chord resolves to the 1 then you will use the MM a half step from the Dom7 (V7), which in fact is the "Altered Scale" this includes the altered tension notes b5 #5 b9 #9.

If the DOM 7 does not resolve to the one (like in a blues) play the MM 5 steps above the Dom7.

I also like to use the MM in a minor cadence (HM is also great on a minor cadence)
#13
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#14
thanx jay
"its not the destination.... so much as the journey" one once said
#15
Learn your intervals and notes. Once done, learn to use your intervals and ear to make the sounds you hear or want.

Realitive Pitch > All those memorized shapes and boxes

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#16
Quote by Marqway
I thought that it did sound like Guthrie Govan alittle bit so was just wondering if they use that scale, if so then I will be learning this scale

Yes. He also recommends that you try playing the scale in various intervals, like fourths.

First off, it's a good finger work out, secondly, it's a good ear bender.

It contains four perfect fourths, two augmented, and one diminished fourth, which sounds the same as a major third.

Play it in fourths, ascending and descending... pretty angular sounding.
#17
Seriously, who cares whether Andy or Guthrie uses the Meldoic Minor scale. Why would it matter to you?
#18
thanx guys
"its not the destination.... so much as the journey" one once said