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#1
So I am wandering what the real difference is between a 22 fret and a 24 fret. I've been picky about buying just 24 fret guitars but I think it's just the childish way of having MORE. Thanks for any and all help.
#2
Personally I don't think it makes any difference, it's only 2 extra notes and I never play that high up the fretboard anyway.

The biggest difference is that 24 fret guitars provide better access to the higher frets.
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#3
I'm still not sure why 22 fret guitars even exist. There's just no tradeoff about 24.
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#4
Quote by z28dylan
I think it's just the childish way of having MORE.


No. It's just a way of having more. How can having more notes be childish?

I buy 24 fret guitars because I use the 24th fret. And maybe I'm wrong about this, but since 24 fret guitars have to give you more room to reach the 24th fret, this also means you have more room to reach all of the other high frets.

EDIT: The extra two notes is particularly useful because a lot of us guitar players have a tendency to play in the key of our lowest note (in standard, would be E, or E minor, obviously), and having 22 frets puts us two notes away from having another E to resolve to, except with a good bend.
Last edited by Macabre_Turtle at Feb 7, 2012,
#5
It totally depends on what you play, i love playing progressive metal music covers, and they pretty much cover the entire fretboard and 24frets are necessary.


The more notes you can hit, the better in my opinion, 24 fret 7 string all the way ^^
Last edited by ZoaL at Feb 7, 2012,
#6
on a 22 fret guitar the neck pickup (on my HH guitars anyway) is positioned where the 24th fret would be, and there is a relatively stronger harmonic node there (4th harmonic is it?) making that pickup sound a bit different than if it was closer to the bridge like on a 24 fret guitar.

Just to wager a guess, I'd say that a 22 fret guitar would have a lower pitch for its neck pickup than the same pickup on a 24 fret guitar because nodes don't sound if they are placed right over pickups. It really is just a guess though.

22 frets should be fine unless you have quite a few things to play that need those extra frets frets.
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#7
Quote by GaryBillington
Personally I don't think it makes any difference, it's only 2 extra notes and I never play that high up the fretboard anyway.

The biggest difference is that 24 fret guitars provide better access to the higher frets.

Not to sound mean, but it's 12 extra notes.
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#8
Quote by Dr Sixstring
Not to sound mean, but it's 12 extra notes.



Wrong, two extra notes but 12 more possibilities to play
#9
well im the lead guitar...and i need the extra access and those two extra notes help with not running out of fretboard

i cant be the only one whos been playing and suddenly forgot how many frets i got...
#10
22 frets is fine, as long as it's not 21 frets - that sucks.
Seriously.
I find it annoying and slightly impossible to play without the 22nd fret.
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#11
Hangar 18 ... or just about any other Megadeth song where Mustaine has a solo
#12
I am getting sick of this threads but I prefer 24 frets
They're good to have when soloing and doing some variations
#13
i've got a 24 fret guitar, and to be completely honest, i've yet to go that high... i venture as high as 22 frequently, but for my style of music and playing, i dont need the extra two frets. the reason i went with the guitar i did was not the frets, but the other features.

given the choice, would i chose a 24 over a 22? my honest answer is: only if the rest of the features are in line with what i want.

basically, if you frequently go as high as 24, why not get one. if you rarely go above the 15th fret, then you should ask yourself if its really worth it
#14
Quote by Dr Sixstring
Not to sound mean, but it's 12 extra notes.


You can play those notes elsewhere on the fretboard. so its really only two.
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#15
Ive never found myself running out of fretboard on my 22 fret guitar.

I think 24+ frets is more geared towards shred stuff
#16
Quote by Dr Sixstring
Not to sound mean, but it's 12 extra notes.

Glad to see several others corrected you before I had the chance to.

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#17
thats pretty funny. i was telling my buddy that i got a 22 fret on ebay thinking it was a 24 and his response was "It's better than 21"
#18
Quote by LivinJoke84
Ive never found myself running out of fretboard on my 22 fret guitar.

I think 24+ frets is more geared towards shred stuff
"Shred stuff" True
#19
24 = two more frets for a full 2-octave range
22 or 21 = warmer, smoother neck tone with better harmonic response

So you're talking tone vs being able to play a couple of extra notes.
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#20
^ yeah

though i'd say for more modern tones, the tone out of a 24 fretter's neck humbucker is arguably better- it's a little tighter with distortion. You actually sometimes see on more modern guitars with 22 frets that the neck humbucker has been moved back a little, i assume for this reason.

but yeah for more vintage tones i prefer the tone of a 22 fretter's neck humbucker (or single coil).
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#22
You can complete another octave with a 24 fret guitar, it gives you better access to higher frets notes in a lot of cases. I play lead so I've written a lot of solos that play easier on a 24 fret guitar, so I can't really go back when I play with my band. I'm always using my other guitars for other applications and I don't really notice the difference.
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#23
24=modern
22=vintage or quieter/cleaner guitar.

General rules. 24 will also have better acces to higher frets.
#24
Wait, how does the amount of frets equate to the type of tone?

Just a general question.
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#25
^ you have to move the neck pickup towards the bridge slightly to accomodate the extra frets. so the tone (when using the neck pickup, or when using any multiple pickup settings in which the neck pickup is one of the active pickups) changes slightly.

shouldn't affect the other pickups' tones
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#27
Quote by evmac
it gives you better access to higher frets notes in a lot of cases.
Quote by n1ckn1ce
24 will also have better acces to higher frets.
Having another two frets tacked on the end does not move the position for the other frets; access is the same. It just so happens that lots of 24-fret guitars have deeper cutaways and slimmer heels than their 21- and 22-fret counterparts.
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#28
Quote by MrFlibble
Having another two frets tacked on the end does not move the position for the other frets; access is the same. It just so happens that lots of 24-fret guitars have deeper cutaways and slimmer heels than their 21- and 22-fret counterparts.


What you really just said was
"Having two more frets does not give you more access to the other frets. Here's why having 24 frets gives you more access to the other frets."

Dude what?
#29
That's not what I said at all. Jesus Christ. Reading comprehension, try it some time.

I'll bullet point this for the more intellectually challenged.
  • Having more frets on a guitar does not inherently make upper-fret access easier. Every fret is the exact same distance from the bridge as it would be if the fretboard ended at 21 or 22 frets.
  • It just so happens that many guitars which have 24 frets happen to have a 'super-Strat' or other modern body style, many of which feature deeper cutaways than a more traditional body style would have.
  • 24 frets does not demand these deeper cutaways.
  • A deeper cutaway does not demand 24 frets.
  • Ergo, having 24 frets does not inherently make upper-fret access easier. Having deeper cutaways or a carved heel is what makes upper-acces easier. It just so happens that these two features are often found on the same guitar.


Saying 24 frets gives you better upper-fret access is like saying having PAF-style humbuckers will give your guitar a thicker neck, or that having a Floyd Rose will make your fretwire larger.
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#30
The main reasonins is higher fret access and the fullness of two octaves a string. I usually insist on 24 because of these mainly.
#31
I don't really care how many frets a guitar has. One of my guitars only has 20 frets, and another has 22 and I don't have a preference. I would like to find a 24 fret guitar, but I haven't found one yet that has what I want.
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#32
I find that the even if you don't use al 24, it makes the 22nd slightly easier to get to
#33
Quote by MrFlibble
That's not what I said at all. Jesus Christ. Reading comprehension, try it some time.

I'll bullet point this for the more intellectually challenged.
  • Having more frets on a guitar does not inherently make upper-fret access easier. Every fret is the exact same distance from the bridge as it would be if the fretboard ended at 21 or 22 frets.
  • It just so happens that many guitars which have 24 frets happen to have a 'super-Strat' or other modern body style, many of which feature deeper cutaways than a more traditional body style would have.
  • 24 frets does not demand these deeper cutaways.
  • A deeper cutaway does not demand 24 frets.
  • Ergo, having 24 frets does not inherently make upper-fret access easier. Having deeper cutaways or a carved heel is what makes upper-acces easier. It just so happens that these two features are often found on the same guitar.


Saying 24 frets gives you better upper-fret access is like saying having PAF-style humbuckers will give your guitar a thicker neck, or that having a Floyd Rose will make your fretwire larger.
I agree that your semantics and logic are flawless.

But it begs a more practical question, " what percentage of 24 fret guitars would you estimate have included the body and neck modifications necessary to take advantage of all frets".

The closer that percentage comes to 100%, the closer to moot the point becomes.
#34
Quote by MrFlibble
That's not what I said at all. Jesus Christ. Reading comprehension, try it some time.

I'll bullet point this for the more intellectually challenged.
  • Having more frets on a guitar does not inherently make upper-fret access easier. Every fret is the exact same distance from the bridge as it would be if the fretboard ended at 21 or 22 frets.
  • It just so happens that many guitars which have 24 frets happen to have a 'super-Strat' or other modern body style, many of which feature deeper cutaways than a more traditional body style would have.
  • 24 frets does not demand these deeper cutaways.
  • A deeper cutaway does not demand 24 frets.
  • Ergo, having 24 frets does not inherently make upper-fret access easier. Having deeper cutaways or a carved heel is what makes upper-acces easier. It just so happens that these two features are often found on the same guitar.


Saying 24 frets gives you better upper-fret access is like saying having PAF-style humbuckers will give your guitar a thicker neck, or that having a Floyd Rose will make your fretwire larger.







Yeah, sure thing dude.

Actually, it's less like saying "having PAF-style humbuckers will give your guitar a thicker neck" and more like saying "getting a smaller car will make you not buy as much gas," because 90% of the time it's true. You're just being picky about semantics because guitars with 24 frets don't give you a deeper cutaway all of the time, just the vast majority of the time. Jesus.
#35
well after reading through this i'm pretty happy that i got a 22 fret guitar because i plan on being more of a rhythm player and i like the sound of having better harmonics
#36
Ya Flibble's right. That's why I said in most cases because guitars with 24 fret are usually designed so that the higher frets are accessible (via cutaways), so it makes the 22nd fret easier to access. However there are 22 fret guitars with good up fret access too, like SG's or Explorers.
Gear:

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Jet City JCA50H
Randall 2x12 wV30s
#37
as far as playing goes, they all have their place.

if i am playing a song in drop D, you only need 22 frets to do most leads because the little 'e' string at the 22nd fret is D. full range.

if in standard and i am doing a lead, i prefer 24 so i have that full two octave range.

however if i am not playing metal or doing a lot of leads, i swear by 22 frets. the additional harmonics available by having the neck pickup moved under where the 24th fret would be, you get the harmonics.

i use 22 fret guitars for blues most of the time, OR a dropped 'X' tuning.

thats how i do it anyways.
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#38
I prefer a 24. My Carvin is a 24 fret and with the deep cutaway, it makes getting to 22 MUCH easier. I rarely hit the 24th. Getting to 22 on my LP involves contorting my hand in a very uncomfortable way. May not be the case for some, but for me it sucks.

And if your 24 is a longer scale then it'll most likely have more string tension than a short scale (LP), so bends will be harder on your fingers.
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#39
Quote by MrFlibble
That's not what I said at all. Jesus Christ. Reading comprehension, try it some time.

I'll bullet point this for the more intellectually challenged.
  • Having more frets on a guitar does not inherently make upper-fret access easier. Every fret is the exact same distance from the bridge as it would be if the fretboard ended at 21 or 22 frets.
  • It just so happens that many guitars which have 24 frets happen to have a 'super-Strat' or other modern body style, many of which feature deeper cutaways than a more traditional body style would have.
  • 24 frets does not demand these deeper cutaways.
  • A deeper cutaway does not demand 24 frets.
  • Ergo, having 24 frets does not inherently make upper-fret access easier. Having deeper cutaways or a carved heel is what makes upper-acces easier. It just so happens that these two features are often found on the same guitar.


Saying 24 frets gives you better upper-fret access is like saying having PAF-style humbuckers will give your guitar a thicker neck, or that having a Floyd Rose will make your fretwire larger.

calm down son, Its not that big a deal.
and generally if a guitar does have 24 frets the design is modified to make them at least reachable..

also lol at the 12 more notes guy
#40
22/21 fret guitars are for grown ups. They just sound much better(of course kids nowadays wouldn't know the diff) and it keeps the kiddie shredders around here from screwing with my guitars.
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