#1
Hey. One of my school friends asked me if i could teach her bass. Im willing to try, but ive been playing guitar for about 5 years..
Im reasonably accomplished, and i know music theory, so i think i could explain how bass works musically, and what its there to do.

Do you think I should try, or just get her a teacher?
#3
Have you ever actually played bass? If youre not adept at playing a particular instrument then you shouldnt attempt to teach it.

Just because you can play guitar doesnt mean you can play bass. I made that assumption (hey, its just like a guitar but with less strings so its easier, right?) but its not the case at all.

There wouldnt be anything wrong with giving your friend some helpful pointers, afterall guitar and bass do overlap somewhat, but if she is serious about playing she should look at getting a bona fide teacher
#4
So it seems like you don't play the bass yourself? I could hire a pianist to teach me how guitar works musically but that wouldn't get me as far as a guitarist teaching me how to play guitar. So unless you've played the bass I wouldn't really recommend it.
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#5
Maybe, You can teach the theory side, scales and arpeggios and stuff like that but the actual fundamental stuff you would need to be a bassist yourself, and you wouldnt be able to teach slap bass if you only play guitar.
#6
Quote by ChucklesMginty
Or correct right hand technique.


This. If you teach him, he's either going to end up with bad right hand technique, and possibly just be one of these bassists that can't play with anything other than a pick. There's nothing wrong with picks, but I think it's healthy for a bassist to start off playing with fingers.
#7
Ah Thanks for all the info guys

I think im gonna teach theory, but find someone to teach the physical side, cause we live in a small town in the middle of nowhere, and its hard to find anyone who knows proper theory.

Thanks for all the replies!
#8
Well if you start teaching her fundamentals I can't see how it can hurt to atleast get her started to see if shes interested and even running over simple things such as hand exercises and building hand strength. ie. the whole 1 finger per fret groups of 4 runs accross and up and down in different patterns and teaching the notes of the fretboard, moving onto scales and modes if you feel confident in explaining them properly and use of application.

In regards to right hand technique start off with fingers, watch some stuff on youtube from GOOD players and I mean good as in professional. eg. Im not a drummer but ive had friend link me shit bad technique covers saying their learning the song and ill smack them.

I'm self taught expecially with my technique and have never really talked to anyone about it yet at gigs i have bassists come up to me and tell me im a monster player with my technique especially on my right hand. So its definately possible.

Once she knows if she actually wants to continue. Find her a bass teacher. But there's no reason for her to pay for lessons as their generally expensive ($30 for 30 mins, or I started paying $70 for an hour from the first bass teacher I ever found worth having a few lessons with) Just for them to give up on it and be out of pocket.


But if you cant find a bass teacher, try help her out. No matter what the other members have said im sure they will agree when I say. Learning bass from a guitarist although its not what you want. It's better then being left in the dark with no guidance and then having them give up on the idea.
#9
Quote by tofuhead
Well if you start teaching her fundamentals I can't see how it can hurt to atleast get her started to see if shes interested and even running over simple things such as hand exercises and building hand strength. ie. the whole 1 finger per fret groups of 4 runs accross and up and down in different patterns and teaching the notes of the fretboard, moving onto scales and modes if you feel confident in explaining them properly and use of application.

In regards to right hand technique start off with fingers, watch some stuff on youtube from GOOD players and I mean good as in professional. eg. Im not a drummer but ive had friend link me shit bad technique covers saying their learning the song and ill smack them.

I'm self taught expecially with my technique and have never really talked to anyone about it yet at gigs i have bassists come up to me and tell me im a monster player with my technique especially on my right hand. So its definately possible.

Once she knows if she actually wants to continue. Find her a bass teacher. But there's no reason for her to pay for lessons as their generally expensive ($30 for 30 mins, or I started paying $70 for an hour from the first bass teacher I ever found worth having a few lessons with) Just for them to give up on it and be out of pocket.


But if you cant find a bass teacher, try help her out. No matter what the other members have said im sure they will agree when I say. Learning bass from a guitarist although its not what you want. It's better then being left in the dark with no guidance and then having them give up on the idea.

Well, I agree with that last past, but i almost disagree with all the rest. Yes, you can help your friend, with the basics, particulary teaching her the fretboard, how it works, first fingering exercises and some theory, but she'll have to look for a decent bass teacher, if possible. I see people that sat that classes are expensive, but hey, no noe said it was easy or cheap! i think taking classes (and paying them) is what it gets to learn. yes, there are examples of people being internet-taught (selftaught, yeah, sure), but i think a teacher can save a lot of time with the guidance through the classes, trying to build the appropiate tehnique, teaching theory, and helping in whatever doubt you have. also, a teacher is there for anytime you start to get stuck with something, and to stimulate you.

Still, she'll appreciate your guidance on the first moments, but you and her have to know that she should get a bass teacher, if possible. hope this helps...
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#10
you could definitely teach the theory side. As for technique and exercises, I would do some research and find some good books to use while teaching. (You should get a bass as well.)
#11
Theres a strong possibility this is an excuse to spend more time with you. Not implying anything just saying there may be alterior motives. Just something to think about before you invest alot of time and money. Best of luck either way
what kind of palm muting is best for metal?
cut off some guys hand and place it under the strings. brutal low end bro.