#1
Bsus4 chord is made of B E F#

This is ok way to play it:

--2-- F#
--5-- E
--4-- B
--4-- F#
--2-- B
--x--

But I heard that this is also Bsus4?:

--2-- F#
--5-- E
--2-- A ???????
--4-- F#
--2-- B
--x--

My chord generator software (chord dictionary 3.0) calls both of this chords B(11). How they can be same chords (B11 or Bsus4, doesn't matter how you call it) when second chords has A which is NOT part of Bsus4 chord?
#2
I'd rely on your theory, and not your software. You seem to understand the significance of the b7.
#3
Not just my software. I found second fingering in one book so I checked by my software and he also says that they are same chords B(11) not Bsus4.
#5
The second chord can be labelled B11 or B7sus4.

Edit: Where did you get that book?
#7
book is from Learn and master guitar DVD collection
Last edited by Huan.BL at Feb 7, 2012,
#8
Sus4 means the 4 appears instead of the 3. 11 means aswell a 3 und a 4(11) may appear in the same chord. Labeling the second chord Bsus is possible but not precise. It is B7sus 4 as already mentioned
#9
If the chord contains a 3rd and 11th, but no 7th, it'll be labelled as "add 4" or "add 11".

Very uncommon to get a "maj11" chord, where the third, fourth, and seventh are all played. Too dissonant.

If the 7th is gonna be there, then it's likely the 3rd will be removed, as in the diagram.
#10
Maj11?

By B(7)11 i think of this and is commonly used in some genres.

-x-
-6-
-8-
-7-
-x-
-7-
#11
^B7#11

B A D# F

It's common in Jazz and Blues. Often resulting from a tritone sub.