#1
e|---------------------------------|
B|---------------------------------|
G|---------------------------------|
D|---------------------------------|
A|-10------------------------------|
E|--8--8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-|
       * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
e|----------------------------------|
B|----------------------------------|
G|----------------------------------|
D|----------------------------------|
A|-8--------------------------------|
E|-6--6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-|
      * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
e|------------------------------|
B|------------------------------|
G|------------------------------|
D|------------------------------|
A|-6----------------------------|
E|-4--4-4-4-4-4-4-4-4-4-4-4-4-4-|
      * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
e|------------------------------|
B|------------------------------|
G|------------------------------|
D|------------------------------|
A|-5--------------8----------9--|
E|-3--3-3-3-3-3-3-6--6-6-6-6-7--|


Say you got this rhythm. How do you solo over it? Can I follow Marty Friedman in his way of doing it? He basically follows each chord and changes, but how do you stay in the same key and what can you solo over it? Can I do minor pentatonic in C - A# - G# - G - A# - B? So I'm asking if I hear C5 chugging can I play C minor pentatonic over it? I don't understand.
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#3
You need to work out what scale you're using... Since You have C, Bb, Ab and G, it's going to be in C... other than the B at the end, this makes it harmonic minor... so you can either play C natural minor or C pentatonic minor and for the end chord change to the harmonic minor for the B
#4
Quote by JNBloomy
You need to work out what scale you're using... Since You have C, Bb, Ab and G, it's going to be in C... other than the B at the end, this makes it harmonic minor... so you can either play C natural minor or C pentatonic minor and for the end chord change to the harmonic minor for the B


Thank you so much dude! Now I understand it.. Cool.
In the eye of the tornado , blow me away!
#5
Another soul lost to the darkside of scalar thinking.. meh
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#6
Quote by Slashiepie
Another soul lost to the darkside of scalar thinking.. meh



Care to explain?
In the eye of the tornado , blow me away!
#7
Essentially, it's better to take your time and learn the notes on the fretboard, chord tones etc... instead of just using the "correct" scales to solo over a progression with. It gives you much more freedom and makes it much easier to add new ideas in.
#9
Teach a man how to fish or just give him a fish ?
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Remixing is for talentless pussies who don't know how to tune a drum or point a microphone.
#10
To be honest.. the best thing imo that you can do if you don't really have much theory knowledge is this:
Record the riff and put it on a loop.
Then start playing notes and make a note of the ones that sound "right" to your ears. Once you have a bunch of notes you like...figure out where they are on every string and go from there.
Sure this process probably takes you longer than applying a given scale and just going with it...but it's probably more rewarding to you as a musician to do this approach.
After that you can of course play around with it a bit...here are some examples:
Restricting yourself to not using a certain note when soloing.
Altering one of the notes and see how that changes things. It might work or it may not...worth trying though.
Adding a note that's not in the group of notes you figured out earlier.
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#11
This is what i do. Know the key your in. Be aware of the chord progression. But kinda just feel it out and hear it out. I cant at least be constantly thinking on the notes of the chords as they change. I just hear the progression and the melody i want to hear over it and attempt to play the melody.
So if i know im in Cm, i stick to the notes in Cm, and just work my way around to harmonize the chords effectively.
#12
This looks more like the key of Ab to me, except for the B at the end which is just an accidental used to add a bit of dissonance. It looks like a metal rhythm after all.

So if you want to think of scales, you could use Ab major, F minor and their pentatonic versions as well.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.
#14
I don't see a major problem in giving him some scales to use in a jam. That's how we all got started right? That's the fun part. If we turn everything into a exercise or lesson in theory then people would just give up.

But the onus is then on the OP to recognise that after he's had his jam-alonga-metal fun then he needs to take some lessons from it. Why do those scales work, what other options for soloing are there such as chord tones and arpeggio's and why do they work. Which is better in a particular context and so on.

Then there is the really good stuff. Listen to Marty's records and slow them down and try to figure out what HE'S doing! Then figure out why it works and steal it for yourself, change it, adapt it and make it yours. Then when you are jammin' along to another artist, you can given them a quick blast of VoodooSnake, instead of Marty!

You should do these things because learning this stuff makes the next jam-alonga-metal jam even more fun than the first, because you know more and have more options.

It's all good. You just need to know that it's out there, just waiting for you to learn it and use it.
#16
Learn some theory.

And ALSO, get a looper pedal if you can afford one. I got one for Christmas and wish I would have gotten one 10 years ago.

A looper pedal will allow you to lay down a rhythm track and then play around soloing over the top of it. (Or vice versa; lay down a solo and then create a rhythm to go with it).

I have learned more about how solos/leads go with rhythm in the last two months than I have learned in 14+ years of playing. Couple that with some theory and you'll be creating good solos; no, good music in short order.
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Last edited by KailM at Feb 8, 2012,