#1
Hi,

recently I've listened to a sick song by Malmsteen and thought about starting to learn sweep picking because it's an amazing technique and using arpeggios can be helpful for soloing.

Do you have any suggestions on how to start learning that best?
Because artists like Malmsteen, Laiho and Buckethead are just way too fast in sweep picking for me to grab a song by them and just learn to play over it.
Do you know any good lessons on the web or any good songs I can start practicing to?
#3
Quote by JNBloomy
Best way is to start small with three string sweeps, this guy helped me

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AaphknrOXrg&feature=plcp&context=C3dab03eUDOEgsToPDskLORab6Vtdd5wUZizVsHuHx



I disagree. I think it worked better for me when I jumped right into 5 string sweeps. This video should help you. Just practice the two sweeping patterns he shows you continuously to a metronome and SLOWLY build up speed to ensure that your sweeps are even and clean. If you notice that your timing is slower or faster when you sweep down, or vice versa, start slowly again and ensure that the timing is even as possible.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waszqgxsEBU
#4
3 string arpeggios only provide the sweepy feeling in the down motion, the up motion is disrupted by a pulloff and only 2 strings before you downstroke again. Thats why I would also learn an easy 5 string arpeggio for the start.

Maybe this pattern or the major() one. No rolls involved.

----------13(14)1713(14)------------
--------15------------------15----------
-----14-----------------------14--------
---15(16)-----------------------15(16)
-17--------------------------------17---
-------------------------------------------

When practising these, besides using a metronome and slowly increase speed, you can also practise it up to tempo beginning only with the first three notes until its clean and only one finger at a time is on the fretboard, the other strings are muted ect. Then you add the next note and so on. That worked for me as an addition to metronome.
You should also practise the arpeggios using alternate picking. It helps memorising them and beeing able to pick through arpeggios is an important and valuable skill. You don´t want to be restricted to sweep picking when it comes to arpeggios.

I would recommend Children of Bodom songs if you want to start using your arpeggios in songs. Alexi usually sweeps in time in 8th triplets which is easy to start with once you mastered the basic technique.
#5
Well, I would recommend practicing five, three, and two string sweeps. I don't understand why you would just stick to one or the other. Don't worry about "licks" at first: just get the boring triad (major and minor) shapes down before you start playing all of those awesome Frank Gambale pentatonic sweeps.
#7
Specific question about sweep-picking regarding the picking hand I haven't seen asked anywhere (nor answered.duh.).

When sweeping down(or up) should I move my entire hand with my elbow, or should I "anchor" the palm at some point and do the entire motion with my wrist only?
(Not strict anchoring by pushing the palm into the guitar body in order to anchor, but rather simply keeping the palm on the same spot and letting the wrist do the motion)

I'd appreciate it if you explain why I should do X and should avoid doing Y.

I hope I've managed to make myself clear...if I haven't please tell. I'll either try to re-phrase it, or post a video to visualize the question.
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#8
Quote by Avielp
Specific question about sweep-picking regarding the picking hand I haven't seen asked anywhere (nor answered.duh.).

When sweeping down(or up) should I move my entire hand with my elbow, or should I "anchor" the palm at some point and do the entire motion with my wrist only?
(Not strict anchoring by pushing the palm into the guitar body in order to anchor, but rather simply keeping the palm on the same spot and letting the wrist do the motion)

I'd appreciate it if you explain why I should do X and should avoid doing Y.

I hope I've managed to make myself clear...if I haven't please tell. I'll either try to re-phrase it, or post a video to visualize the question.


It depends on the size of the sweep, what you're doing around it and the size of your hands. Personally I can get away with just doing a straight up-down 5 string sweep with just my wrist but if I was doing any single-string picking at either end I'd likely move from the elbow more to keep the wrist in a neutral position for picking.

If you've got smaller hands though you can probably only do smaller sweeps with wrist motion only and even then I'd recommend going for the elbow if you want to do any more intricate picking before or after.

Same guidelines as for most other things apply: pick from the wrist but use the elbow motion to keep the wrist at a good angle to the strings.


Hope that's clear enough, if not I'll try again
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#9
Quote by Avielp
Specific question about sweep-picking regarding the picking hand I haven't seen asked anywhere (nor answered.duh.).

When sweeping down(or up) should I move my entire hand with my elbow, or should I "anchor" the palm at some point and do the entire motion with my wrist only?
(Not strict anchoring by pushing the palm into the guitar body in order to anchor, but rather simply keeping the palm on the same spot and letting the wrist do the motion)

I'd appreciate it if you explain why I should do X and should avoid doing Y.

I hope I've managed to make myself clear...if I haven't please tell. I'll either try to re-phrase it, or post a video to visualize the question.


For larger sweeps I move my entire forearm. There is a bit of motion in my wrist but its mostly forearm. I find it harder to mute the other strings and get a clean tone if the angel between string and pick changes during the sweep.
During alternate picking my forarm moves a bit too when changing strings while the picking motion is done by the wrist. So thats equivalent I guess. Sweeping is mostly string changes and only scattered picking.
#10
Yeah, basically the forearm has a much greater range of motion and can comfortably sweep through all the strings, the wrist can't really remain fixed and do sweeps unless you have ridiculously huge hands (see Jason Becker).
#11
I dunno about that. I have pretty average sized hands and I can do seven-string sweeps without any problem using only my wrists. When I use my wrist for sweeping, I have a much easier time switch to other techniques than when using my forearm. Especially when you aren't doing purely symmetrical arpeggios but are instead mixing sweeping with alternate picking or tapping or some other technique, I have a much easier time when using my wrist.
#13
Sweeping is something that starting "working" for me only recently, what was it that made it happen for me? I'll tell you but if you are the type of guitarist who wants to learn to wank arpeggios like malmsteen over-night, I dont think it will be an answer that you will like

It all goes back to when I decided that I sucked MAJORLY when it came to the technical area of chord changes, plus I didnt know were alot of the possible chords (which is essentialy all arpeggios) were on the fret board. So I sat down and isolated the issue on sets of 4 of the 6 strings @ a time.

First I sat down and Used C Maj as a template, then transposed to all keys. Then stuck em all in a neato little binder and now its like my little book

Since I,IV,&V are the most import of the Diatonic chords they are a logical place to start
You would be surprised at how many guitarists would struggle @ doing even something like this cleanly and effortlessly @ 40B.P.M.
E|------------------------------------|
B|-1--1--0--5--6--3---7---10---8--|
G|-0--2--0--5--5--4---9---10--7---|
D|-2--3--0--5--7--5--10--10---9---|
A|-3--3--2--7--8--5--10--12--10---|
E|-------------------------------------|

then when you get comfortable w/ the above idea in all keys,
then start tossing in all inversions of the ii, and VI ect ect

then when you can play them all effortlessly as a block chord, start alternate picking them as different arpeggio sequences.
E|------------------------------------------------------|
B|-------5-----------------6----------------3---------|
G|---5-------5------5----------5-----4----------4--o|
D|-----5---5-----------7----7-----------5-----5----o|
A|-7---------------8---------------5------------------|
E|-----------------------------------------------------|

This whole process will kill 2 birds w/ one stone 1.) beef up ur left hand so it will have the strength and co-ordination to play sweeps, and 2.) you will know where all your arpeggio shapes are.
#14
Seeing as we're on this topic.
What's the best way to mute strings when sweeping upwards? I know the mechanics of doing it when down-sweeping, but I tend to have my hand in a more classical position and therefore I find it odd to use my fret hand to mute the strings when coming up.
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#15
^ normal left hand muting should be more than adequate. On electric guitar perfect "classical" posture is incorrect - the first finger must be flat enough to mute the higher strings at all times. Can you give a specific problem?