#1
hello

on stage, guitar tone kinda doesnt sound as it does in the audience, and you cant just easily walk into the audience and hear for yourself so,

how do you know when it sounds good? because if it sounds good on stage, tehres a chance it wont sound good out in the audience. And like if the gain is too much etcetc, D:
#2
Have a friend stand in the audience and report back, or pray to god there's a sound engineer.
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#3
Well my rule of thumb is if it sounds good when i record myself it should translate to sounding close to an audience, but that also cant factor in the natural acoustics of the place and how badly a soundguy is treating the sound. When i was playing in a church band, i'd have to get input from someone in the audience section before we started to get an idea.
#4
wireless. thats how i always set my band up with pa. we play a number i stand in the back or middleish with my guitar playing and listen what needs to be higher. but in the easy world get a friend that you trust, who isnt just a fan of your guitar playing or else that level will most likely be way to high and not have a good mix.
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#5
Volume.

If you're loud enough, people won't notice/care how bad your tone is.
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#6
have a buddy you trust take a listen to your whole band. what you hear on-stage will be different than what the audience hears not only because of proximity to the speaker cone, but also because of the mix with other instruments. you may find that you have to have a set-up that sounds odd to you on stage to get something that sounds right to the audience (I find that I have to have a much brighter sound- more presence and treble- than I would like to stand out in the mix)
#7
If your cab is beaming directly at you, the crowd will hear it differently because they're off axis, as well as farther away. Like others said, either get a wireless or long ass cable and stand off stage, or get someone whose ear you trust and have them tell you how it sounds.
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#8
Get a friend who is hopefully a musician to set the levels.

Don't trust sound engineers. Most of them are ****ing asshats who will max out the vocals and turn everything else down, or all you'll be able to hear is bass and drums. I've been to some high profile venues where I would immediately fire the sound techs, because it just sounds bad.

Just last night I saw In Flames at The Wiltern in Hollywood. It sounded terrible.
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#9
The sound guy is as important part of the band as any of the instruments or vocalists. I don't care how good you are, if the sound mix is off it's going to sound like crap. I don't normally use a wireless when playing, but I do use one for sound checks.
#10
Quote by Offworld92
Get a friend who is hopefully a musician to set the levels.

Don't trust sound engineers. Most of them are ****ing asshats who will max out the vocals and turn everything else down, or all you'll be able to hear is bass and drums. I've been to some high profile venues where I would immediately fire the sound techs, because it just sounds bad.

Just last night I saw In Flames at The Wiltern in Hollywood. It sounded terrible.

That's utter bollocks, and generally the kind of thing you hear from egotistical guitarists who think the world revolves round them.

A good sound engineer can make or break a band as far as sounding good goes, often if the sound isn't good at a venue it's not the engineers fault but an issue with the equipment, professional bands simply don't employ shitty sound guys, they work with people they trust.
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#11
I call it like I hear it

I've been to many, many shows (see my profile), and a lot of them sounded bad.

Every part of the band is equally important. I've been to many shows where you cannot hear the guitar, or the vocals, at all.

The best sounding show I've ever been to was Evanescence at the Hollywood Palladium. Everything in the mix was perfect, I could hear each instrument perfectly, I could tell the difference between the two guitarists. A lot of shows just sound like noise.
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My band:
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(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X