#1
I've been playing for roughly 7 years now but I haven't really varied my tuning much - started standard, switched to drop-D, and now I'm experimenting with drop-C. I've started to listen to more post-metal, stoner metal, etc. and love the low and heavy tones they get. So I decided to look up some tabs to see their tunings. For one band (Kylesa), a song called for a drop-G tuning (G D G C E A) ... and I did a double-take to make sure I was reading it properly. When I'm tuning to drop-C it seems like the strings are loose, so I'm curious as to if there's a special technique for stringing and/or tuning a guitar to tune it so low? (so that you can actually play instead of having the strings sort of dangle on your guitar)
I am twelve and Что это?

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#3
Dropped G without a 7 string? I was always under the impression that it was really impractical to go much lower than Bb or A on a standard guitar. It's possible that they use baritone guitars which have longer scales and thicker string grooves in the nut to accommodate thicker strings - they'd need to be pretty damn thick to hold a low G in tune. As for tunings like C and B, all you should really need is a thicker set of strings (I've played in dropped b with 10-52 gauge and been alright) and maybe a set-up and intonation check.
#4
Thicker strings always fixed the problem for me. I'll play in Drop C when I'm feeling heavy (Standard D otherwise which is basically the same thing but with the low string tuned to D instead of C) and I use 11-49 strings. I recently discovered the 10-52's by Ernie Ball so I might switch to those eventually.
#6
Quote by _Benighted_
Dropped G without a 7 string? I was always under the impression that it was really impractical to go much lower than Bb or A on a standard guitar. It's possible that they use baritone guitars which have longer scales and thicker string grooves in the nut to accommodate thicker strings - they'd need to be pretty damn thick to hold a low G in tune. As for tunings like C and B, all you should really need is a thicker set of strings (I've played in dropped b with 10-52 gauge and been alright) and maybe a set-up and intonation check.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22xFxEwcZ2Q

Drop G on 70s Les Pauls.
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#7
Either get a baritone guitar or a 7 string.
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#8
Quote by Junior#1
Either get a baritone guitar or a 7 string.


Band OP is talking about: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrIAidNea14

Looks like a normal Les Paul to me
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#9
I guess I'll try out thicker strings. Like Zaphod said, the band I referenced uses a regular Les Paul so that's why I wasn't sure how they did it.
I am twelve and Что это?

Quote by Dopey_Trout
I think the problem you're having is you're trying to apply logic to Christianity, a religion based on a cosmic zombie