#1
Hey everyone. I recently got an Ibanez RG570, and I originally set it up with 10's and tuned to D standard. Everything was fine, but today I went to tune the guitar to standard or dropped-d and no matter what it'd go out of tune. I'd tune all six strings, and by the time I'm done they're already out of tune. I keep raising the pitch over and over until the bridge is at like a 45 degree angle or higher, and at that point I just de-tuned since it'd be impossible to play comfortably like that.

I even re-strung the guitar with a fresh set of tens, and same problem. Even if I tune two strings at a time and lock 'em down at the nut, they still end up out of tune, so much that I can't use the fine tuners.

I let the strings rest of a bit while I was out but it still happens when I try to tune to standard or dropped D. Do I need to use 9s or something?

Thanks for any advice. If my post isn't clear let me know, I'll try to give more details.

EDIT: I know you usually have to tune multiple times before everything's stable, but in this case its never-ending. The tuner keeps telling me I'm way flat and after like the dozenth run-through my bridge is basically vertical.
Last edited by TJM2482 at Feb 8, 2012,
#2
Every major tuning change you will need to adjust the springs in the back to have the trem level.

Read teh setup thread to see how
#3
Yeh look at the floyd rose setup page, they're cool once you get used to them though but not so handy for changing tunings.
#4
Ah, okay. Was used to my old ZR (S470) bridge, was really noob-friendly. Thanks!
#5
Just to remove some of the mystery from this issue...

What happened was when you increased the string tension by bringing the pitch up a step, you didn't increase the spring tension to compensate.

A floating trem is all about balance. The spring tension will equal the overall string tension no matter what. What's going to change if you leave the springs alone but manipulate the tuners is tuning and bridge position. When you change the tension on one string the others will balance it out. So it's best to tune with the bridge blocked, then adjust the springs until the bridge stays in that position (with that tuning) by itself.

The other factor is you have to have the strings stretched all the way, otherwise the string tension keeps changing and your tuning will go all over the place.

Pretty simple once you wrap your head around the concepts. Shame there's so much misinformation out there.

BTW, if you're going to adjust the action, be sure to disconnect the springs first. Otherwise you grind the hell out of your knife edges if you do it under tension. Especially if your RG570 is a newer one, not an old MIJ.
#6
I had that trem on an ibanez i use to have, I liked the way you could lock it to stop it going out of tune but I couldn't get the same dives like you do with a proper floyd.
#7
Don't forget too that since the double locking trem is about balance, you can't tune it like a non trem guitar. You want to cross tune it. Meaning tune the low E, then the high E, then the B, then the A, then the D, then the G. In this way, you're distributing the tension more evenly allowing you to get in tune faster.
#8
Quote by Fenderexpx50
Don't forget too that since the double locking trem is about balance, you can't tune it like a non trem guitar. You want to cross tune it. Meaning tune the low E, then the high E, then the B, then the A, then the D, then the G. In this way, you're distributing the tension more evenly allowing you to get in tune faster.


That will drive you crazy. Fastest way is block (both directions--inside the trem cavity), tune, and then adjust the claw springs to where the trem returns to the correct tuning.

Another option is to just block the trem on top of the guitar under the bridge, and overtighten the claw screws a little. Then tune, remove the block, and back off the claw screws until it returns to pitch. (Most pros seem to do it that way, but it's not as good for the guitar).