#1
Hi everyone, first time posting heres was hoping someone could help. Im having a little bit of trouble in my MT class. Were going over cadences, phrases, period forms, things of that nature. I understand the material pretty well, Im just having trouble actually finding and labeling everything. Like they give you 16 or so measures on a grand staff, you have to label the cadence types, phrases, forms ect and i cant seem to figure it out.
The phrases are all 4 measures long, but i dont know if your supposed to figure out the cadences using the last chord of say the 3rd measure and the first chord of the 4th, what you do if theres multiple chords, ect. Im also having a bit of trouble actually finding the chords in the more complicated passages. I know that when the nots are stacked on top of each other there played at the same time, but looking in my textbook I see notes on the staff that arnt stacked or seem seprate from the initial chord, and they seem to group them together anyway, so the measures with a whole mess of notes is really throwing me off.
Sorry if that dosnt make alot of sense its kinda hard to explain and im dead tired from trying to figure it all out on my own the past few hrs. Thanks atlot in advance
#2
Forget about chords, these things were written before modern harmony was developed. Niether will you find cadences in particular measures necessarily, it's more like looking for the ways that harmonic structures (notes stacked on top of each other either in chords or arpeggios) resolve at the end of melodic phrases.
You need to know what you're looking for: perfect cadences V- I, plagal IV-I, half-cadence ii-V (anything ending on a V). There are more, google them if you need to but hopefully they won't be expecting more than this.
So find the I chords at the end of phrases and look for the chord immediately preceding them/ If it's a V then you've got a perfect cadence, if it's a IV it's plagel. If the phrase ends on a V it's a half cadence. They don't always occur at the end of the phrase but they usually do.
This wikipedia page is a good one http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadence_(music)
It takes a bit to get your head around because you're relying on dots and the harmonic movements are different to modern songs but you'll get the hang of it.
Last edited by mr-curley at Feb 9, 2012,
#4
Yea I wish I could post an example but its on a work sheet. My main problem is after I find where the cadences are, what to do next. They want me to label the phrases and forms as well, and I cant figure out how to go about doing that.
#5
the chords that you say have notes directly to the side are called inversions.
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#6
Quote by castlecat
Hi everyone, first time posting heres was hoping someone could help. Im having a little bit of trouble in my MT class. Were going over cadences, phrases, period forms, things of that nature. I understand the material pretty well, Im just having trouble actually finding and labeling everything. Like they give you 16 or so measures on a grand staff, you have to label the cadence types, phrases, forms ect and i cant seem to figure it out.
The phrases are all 4 measures long, but i dont know if your supposed to figure out the cadences using the last chord of say the 3rd measure and the first chord of the 4th, what you do if theres multiple chords, ect. Im also having a bit of trouble actually finding the chords in the more complicated passages. I know that when the nots are stacked on top of each other there played at the same time, but looking in my textbook I see notes on the staff that arnt stacked or seem seprate from the initial chord, and they seem to group them together anyway, so the measures with a whole mess of notes is really throwing me off.
Sorry if that dosnt make alot of sense its kinda hard to explain and im dead tired from trying to figure it all out on my own the past few hrs. Thanks atlot in advance



When you see notes that seem off to the side but part of the same "stack", do let that confuse you; they are played along with the others...they are notated that way for clarity.

For cadences, first list out all the chords, as you identify them, then apply the rules of cadences to identify the types, For example a F followed by a C if the progression is in the Key of C would be seen as Plagal.

Good luck.

Best,

Sean
#7
Thanks for the help it cleared things up a bit. Also, the phrases are the parts that end in the cadence and a period is 2 phrases together, am I getting that right?