#1
I don't like the sound of my own voice in recordings; I know that's pretty common, and I know why. But is it possible for you to accurately decipher between that effect and actual faults in your voice? I'm finding it very hard. When I listen back and concentrate on things like pitch, timing, phrasing, etc, it's all okay, but then I'll go back to listen again and absolutely hate it. Then there's also the fact that 99% of the people you ask in person will say it sounds "great," so unless you find someone with actual experience and good ears that doesn't help.

Thoughts?

EDIT: Also, I should mention that I don't have any recent recordings uploaded. The ones on my profile have objectively bad vocals. Just FYI.
We're only strays.
#2
I hate my voice on everything out side of Punk Rock. I grew up singing punk and when I try to do stuff outside of it, it doesn't sound good.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#3
What are you hearing that you don't like about it if timing, pitch, and phrasing is all on?

If you ask close friends they may not be completely objective with you so a good option would be to upload some stuff and have some board members listen.
#4
I uploaded something I laid down this week, it's called Homeless. It's just the raw takes, no mixing aside from some very basic things like fades, cutting out noise, and a Pro-Tools plugin put on my voice. I got it done at a recording school and they gave me the session which I'm going to send to a friend to mix, but they also gave me a simple mix down so I could hear it.

So anyways, my voice on it just sounds small to me, and like it's lacking some feeling. I don't really HATE it, I just dissect it and pick out every part that could be different. I'm just not sure if that's providing me an accurate overall impression of my performance.

Edit: Also as an aside I think on the mix down they muted the right main guitar track and forgot about it; the guitar in the left speaker should be a lot more prevalent. Plus it sounds like there's a phaser (or flanger?) effect on it which I really dislike. Stuff my friend is going to fix, just wanted to mention it...
We're only strays.
Last edited by Martyr's Prayer at Feb 10, 2012,
#5
It doesn't really sound like you're trying to sing, if that makes any sense?

I don't get any emotion from your singing in the song, there's no energy to it. It sounds like you're focusing too hard on saying the correct lyrics at the correct pitch and you've completely forgot about actually getting into the music.

Your voice does have potential, but although you're not necessarily hitting bad notes (though, there are a few parts where you do), you're not hitting the right notes that I think you should be. You're also ending your notes too early at the end of your phrasing in a lot of parts, which makes the vocals seem choppy, like you didn't think out the performance of the lyrics very well.

From listening to your previous recordings, Homeless is definitely an improvement over the pitchiness on your other songs, but they still lack the energy of your performance.
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#6
Its sort of natural to think 'is that what i sound like!?!' but try to take a step back and think of it as someone elses voice.

Its sort of a "the grass is greener on the other side" effect, you'll like what someone else has got and they will think the same about you.

I think the key is to make your voice as dynamic as possible, try out different inflections and vibrato etc in your recordings. I usually sing a base track, then go back and make things softer where they need to be, grittier when i can (blues growl on those low notes?), and definitely definitely use compression on your voice.

Compression makes a world of difference, it means you can belt out notes at full projection for the verses and quieter bits WITHOUT them being a) too loud, b) too intrusive on the recording and c) without taking the fullness or "energy" out of your voice.
Then for the louder parts, open up the threshold and voila - dynamic vocals.

Actual pitch problems would be apparent, if you're unsure just check it against an auto-tune function and if it needs a huge adjustment go sing it again. I think you may even be able to add vibrato using a plugin these days...
Always waiting for that bit of inspiration.