#2
Lol. I'd usually close this as it's a blatant promotion of your youtube site, but really, the harmonic minor scale changed your life?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
In my life, that change is known as a "devastating setback".

...modes and scales are still useless.


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Last edited by Xiaoxi at Feb 9, 2012,
#4
Mate, if you wanna go outside over a minor chord, the trick in Fusion is to play a minor pentatonic a major 3rd below the root of the chord.

Alternatively, just side step.
#6
Quote by AdrianGalysh
This isn't the harmonic minor scale.

Yea, the harmonic minor scale would have a G#. This has an Ab in the key of A minor (lol). Totally different.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#7
I know. It doesn't sound outside at all. Hence the suggestions.
#8
Quote by AdrianGalysh
This isn't the harmonic minor scale.


Natual minor + major 7th = ?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#9
@ MDC - Doesn't sound outside at all? Sorry, didn't know this was a forum full of argumentative know-it-alls. You're entitled to your opinion though. To me and many others, it does sound a bit outside, as the video describes, over an A dominant or minor chord. I am aware of your other suggestions - thanks, as positive input is helpful to readers looking to expand their musical vocabulary. However, this scale didn't "change my life" yesterday....

@Xcdev.... Similar but not the same. Is the major pentatonic scale the same as the major diatonic? They are similar, but could be used in different contexts, and are not necessarily interchangeable.

@ Alan, why would someone close a thread of a video guitar lesson, posted in the Musician Talk section of a forum? I'm not sure what a non-youtubechannel promoting video post would be? An anonymous post of someone else's video lesson? Why it would be an issue, this video is clearly considered helpful to many viewers except the 3 who have commented above.
#10
Sometimes a different perspective is helpful for guitarists trying to learn and expand their vocabulary. Jazz musicians and classical musicians may see the idea one way because of the context with which they have to apply their understanding of the theory. Other musicians may find it helpful if the concept is explained another way, from a different angle.

The scale presented does exactly what the video describes. It gives rock guitarists, who are intimately familiar with the minor pentatonic scale, an easy way to achieve and "outside" sound - usable when ever they would already consider using the minor pentatonic scale.

Henry Johnson is no slouch, and the simple change is effective.
#11
Because it's blatant promotion of your youtube channel, which is the purpose of you signing up with this site. Dont worry, Ill get to a desktop soonish and sort it out.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#12
Quote by AlanHB
Natual minor + major 7th = ?


The scale that is altered (flatted root) is the minor pentatonic. Not the diatonic natural minor scale. While both have similarities, some notes and tonality, they ARE different.
#13
Quote by AdrianGalysh
Sometimes a different perspective is helpful for guitarists trying to learn and expand their vocabulary. Jazz musicians and classical musicians may see the idea one way because of the context with which they have to apply their understanding of the theory. Other musicians may find it helpful if the concept is explained another way, from a different angle.

The scale presented does exactly what the video describes. It gives rock guitarists, who are intimately familiar with the minor pentatonic scale, an easy way to achieve and "outside" sound - usable when ever they would already consider using the minor pentatonic scale.

Henry Johnson is no slouch, and the simple change is effective.


Why the hell would someone need a scale to achieve an outside sound ?

Im starting to understand why guys like Xiaoxi call them setbacks, first you create an imaginary set of rules to stay "in the scale" afterwards you create another imaginary set of rules to be "outside the scale" this in turn enables you to bend the imaginary rules that you created int he first place.. whats next a scale to be outside the scale you are in and an outside scale to be inside the scale you are out?

its like a scale, inside the scale of a scale, just because it sounds clever doesnt mean it is! Inception!
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#14
Ok, I'm sorry for the hostility earlier, but I don't like it when people promote false info or "shortcuts" to musical concepts.

Essentially, this pattern has the implication of a harmonic or melodic minor scale, with the minor 7th acting as a passing tone to the leading tone. Just because you omit a few scale degrees does not mean it's a different scale altogether.

While I can appreciate that you're trying to break this down the fastest way physically so that rock guitarists can get a quick fix, there are some things here that are fundamentally misleading. For one, there is no such thing as "flattening the root." That would mean you weren't really in the key of A minor to begin with. But the major disservice, as is all too common, is the lack of emphasis on the logic behind the licks.

Giving them this shortcut may help the guitarist obtain a new trick in that exact context. But come time to actually play music with moving harmony, this just becomes another jumble of mess that hinders the ability to truly improvise. It's not at all surprising that you would demonstrate this example without any regards to musical context and just briefly play a flashy lick. What should have been explained is how you can achieve "out of key" flavors by simply approaching chromatic notes with stepwise motion from the diatonic notes, which is exactly what happens in this video. Not only does that accurately explain this scalar pattern, but it also unlocks all chromatic possibilities with the flexibility of being able to think on the fly about how to handle outside notes at any given harmonic point.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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Last edited by Xiaoxi at Feb 9, 2012,