#1
For an assignment in university I need to pick two pieces from the Late Baroque period and write about how they can communicate with audiences despite the strict disciplines followed by their composers.

I really don't know which pieces to choose. I'm thinking I need to at least include something of Bach's fugal works, because...well, why wouldn't you?

But I'd appreciate suggestions of any other piece to talk about?


EDIT: I was thinking abour Pachelbel's Chaconne in Fm as a possibility
Last edited by a_7_x at Feb 9, 2012,
#2
"communicate with audiences"?
So university music courses require you to do that thing where you pretend that every single piece of music has a meaning, even if it has no lyrics, and even though 99% of the time nobody is actually imagining a certain message or feeling as they write? Yeah, remind me to stay out of those classes.
#3
Why do you feel you need to use a fugal work? I mean, obviously Bach's fugal work is communicating something, but surely it would be much easier to go for choral works, given that in the baroque period pretty much all (if not all) choral music was explicitly religious? Or is religious subject matter one of the 'strict disciplines' you speak of, that you have to look past?

I haven't got any suggestions for pieces, just rambling in the hope that I can help in some way...
Last edited by korinaflyingv at Feb 9, 2012,
#4
Quote by korinaflyingv
Why do you feel you need to use a fugal work? I mean, obviously Bach's fugal work is communicating something, but surely it would be much easier to go for choral works, given that in the baroque period pretty much all (if not all) choral music was explicitly religious? Or is religious subject matter one of the 'strict disciplines' you speak of, that you have to look past?

I haven't got any suggestions for pieces, just rambling in the hope that I can help in some way...


Nice job trying to edit that out before I saw it.
#6
Quote by korinaflyingv
yeah, i disagree with you but i can't word it properly


I think you're just misunderstanding what I mean. I'm saying that without lyrics which would of course narrow down the meanings, a song with no lyrics, even if the composer did have a message in mind while writing it, will not get us the message the composer was imagining. 99 times out of a 100, a composer really can't have something in mind, be it lost love, celebration, spring time, birth of a child, and make us think the same thing when we hear it.
#7
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
I think you're just misunderstanding what I mean. I'm saying that without lyrics which would of course narrow down the meanings, a song with no lyrics, even if the composer did have a message in mind while writing it, will not get us the message the composer was imagining. 99 times out of a 100, a composer really can't have something in mind, be it lost love, celebration, spring time, birth of a child, and make us think the same thing when we hear it.

"even though 99% of the time nobody is actually imagining a certain message or feeling as they write"
I only misunderstood because you mistyped, and in a rather derogatory manner But I think perhaps you misunderstand the work that goes on at (good) music institutions. It's not just guesswork based on listening to the piece over and over until you get the meaning. It's mostly based on research, trying to figure out what was going on in a composer's life at the time a certain piece was written - reading letters to friends and family which might contain explicit meanings of pieces, or just general contextualising information. And sources like these keep being uncovered all the time. It's not about pretentious stereotypical art students coming up with pseudo-intellectual wank, it's just about striving to understand something better. Nobody's pretending they have the answers. I find it fascinating really, although it's not something I'd choose to pursue. I'm a composer at heart.

anyway, thread has been derailed enough...
Last edited by korinaflyingv at Feb 9, 2012,