#1
What's up everyone, next year I'm going to be auditioning for music programs at schools. The school I'm really looking to get into is University of North Texas in Denton, Texas. I'll be doing other places as well, but I was wondering what experiences you guys have had auditioning for music programs at schools, if you happen to have auditioned at UNT, feel free to tell me about that as well. Thanks!!
#2
A member on this forum, The Madcap, goes there I think. Message him.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#5
I'm not going to lie, I'm a bit nervous too, I have about 9 or 10 months until I probably audition but I'm a bit scared how I'm going to pick up jazz or classical in that time span. i can play jazz somewhat but I'm no Metheny
#6
Quote by randyaintdead82
I'm not going to lie, I'm a bit nervous too, I have about 9 or 10 months until I probably audition but I'm a bit scared how I'm going to pick up jazz or classical in that time span. i can play jazz somewhat but I'm no Metheny


Lessons?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#8
^^^ if you're dedicated enough, yes.

Although whether you want to study something (jazz) that you're not drawn to naturally is completely debatable.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#9
It isn't my primary genre but I'd love to really explore another side of music. I just...don't know where to start. Kind of overwhelming
#10
Hmm, can you guess? Or give up in the "overwhelming" possibility of somehow learning new music?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#12
Start lessons with a dude who does jazz gigs. If you ask anyone else, they'll just give you root position 7 chords and you dont want that.

Also listen to Wes Montgomery, Joe Pass, and Juan Gilberto. Know them. Love them.

As for the actual audition, as a guitarist, they're looking for tasteful comping, not just chugging 1,2,3,4 (unless you're doing a Count Basie thing). Decent interpretation of the melody, maybe being able to comp the changes between melody notes. And tasteful improv.
I use the word tasteful because when people first start improving, they want to show off their chops. This leads to unimaginative lines, and normally playing out of time.

Play to your level. They want to see where you are. In an audition, they're not looking for skill. If you were a master already, you wouldn't need to go to college cause you'd be touring or gigging every night. They're looking for POTENTIAL.

Many places probably want you to play 2 songs of contrasting styles. A good stand-by is a Blues and some sort of latin tune.

Some good blues heads:
Blue Monk, Straight No Chaser, Sandu
Some good Latin heads:
Blue Bossa, Girl From Ipanema, How Insensitive

These are standards too so most jazz players will be familiar with them.

EDIT: JACKIIIEE... One more thing...
Find out how the auditions are run. I (as a bass player) auditioned 3 places, one place had me play the tunes by myself, the next had me play a duo with one of the judges who played piano, the 3rd had a rhythm section comprised of students from the college that I played with.

These are all VERY different ways to play and it could affect your song choices when it comes down to it.

EDITEDIT:
One last last thing. Playing from memory is also a big big plus.
OK, I'm done for now, if you have any questions, I'll be back tomorrow.
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Last edited by King Of Suede at Feb 11, 2012,
#13
Quote by randyaintdead82
Just learn some jazz?


Ding!

And lessons if your heart is set on the music school thing.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#14
Quote by King Of Suede
Start lessons with a dude who does jazz gigs. If you ask anyone else, they'll just give you root position 7 chords and you dont want that.

Also listen to Wes Montgomery, Joe Pass, and Juan Gilberto. Know them. Love them.

As for the actual audition, as a guitarist, they're looking for tasteful comping, not just chugging 1,2,3,4 (unless you're doing a Count Basie thing). Decent interpretation of the melody, maybe being able to comp the changes between melody notes. And tasteful improv.
I use the word tasteful because when people first start improving, they want to show off their chops. This leads to unimaginative lines, and normally playing out of time.

Play to your level. They want to see where you are. In an audition, they're not looking for skill. If you were a master already, you wouldn't need to go to college cause you'd be touring or gigging every night. They're looking for POTENTIAL.

Many places probably want you to play 2 songs of contrasting styles. A good stand-by is a Blues and some sort of latin tune.

Some good blues heads:
Blue Monk, Straight No Chaser, Sandu
Some good Latin heads:
Blue Bossa, Girl From Ipanema, How Insensitive

These are standards too so most jazz players will be familiar with them.

EDIT: JACKIIIEE... One more thing...
Find out how the auditions are run. I (as a bass player) auditioned 3 places, one place had me play the tunes by myself, the next had me play a duo with one of the judges who played piano, the 3rd had a rhythm section comprised of students from the college that I played with.

These are all VERY different ways to play and it could affect your song choices when it comes down to it.

EDITEDIT:
One last last thing. Playing from memory is also a big big plus.
OK, I'm done for now, if you have any questions, I'll be back tomorrow.



Ah I know Wes and Joe!! I learned 4 on 6 a while ago and have been messing with the idea of using that as part of the audition if it lets me. And knowing some inverted chords helps? One of my teachers did stress to me the importance of being a a comp with good pocket. As for improvising a lot of people claim to outline the chords a lot of the time, but it's hard for me to think about that right on the dot, so is it important to maybe develop some of my own patterns? Also I will keep the standards in mind too.
#17
My audition might have been a bit different than most, but I essentially had to do 3 solo jazz guitar pieces. They asked me to play a random major scale and melodic minor scale as fast as I could, and I think they also asked me do play 2 octaves of a major 7th, dominant 7th, and minor 7th arpeggio. They then asked me to do some improv. I had absolutely no backing and had to come up with a chord progression by myself and then try to comp/improvise at the same time, and I didn't feel too good about my performance once it was over. I was nervous, I had never tried to play lead and rhythm at the same time, and it ended up feeling awkward, choppy, and uninspired.

Still, I got in. The reasons, in my opinion, were that I displayed a decent chord vocabulary with my solo pieces, I felt comfortable with the swing rhythm, and I was able to recover from mistakes without losing my place in a song (and believe me, there were mistakes. I basically forgot a piece halfway through and had to improvise two bars until i met up with the next part of the tune).

I think your audition panel will want to know that you can jump into an ensemble and be ready to comp the chords to a song within a few seconds of seeing the chart - even if you have to revert to some root position chords, it's better to play something than nothing at all. In that respect, you should at least know E and A string chords of every type, and get them down well enough that you can see a chord and instantly go to it without thinking. These will be your "safety" chords. Then you can continue to work on more voicings and inversions.

The audition panel will also want to see that you can improvise - not over an ornette coleman tune or anything insane, but over something common. Even if it's charlie parker, they'd rather you treated it like a simple blues tune than try and touch on every altered chord and substitution. Slower playing is better than faster playing, so long as it sounds inspired. They want to see that you can feel the music and play what you want to hear - not some licks that you think will be "jazzy" enough to impress them. By all means, study some jazz solos, but do it to get new ideas for your own phrasing - don't memorize licks and just try to fit them in somewhere.

Lastly, the panel might ask you about your influences and what kinds of jazz you're interested in. It's at this point that you'll want to have actually listened to some jazz so that you can honestly say what you're into. If you can't name any artists that you like, they're going to wonder why you're auditioning for a degree in jazz performance. Heck, if you don't have any jazz artists that you like, I'm going to wonder why you're auditioning for a jazz performance degree. You'd better make sure you like the music you're going to be surrounded by for 4 years.
#18
Haha believe me I am into jazz, just not crazy good at it. but today was a good start as I taught myself a few basic major+major 7th arpeggios