#1
So I just started taking guitar lessons again after about four years of barely playing. I've decided to really dedicate myself to the instrument again.

Anyhow, my instructor started me off with a lesson on triads. I understand the basics of triads, three notes make up chords, and you can strip chords down to those three notes to make a triad chord. All good.

He showed me one progression (C-F-C-G-F) in four positions, and then gave me two other progressions (C-Am-F-G and D-Bm-G-A) to figure out myself. While trying to Google triads for a little extra help, I discovered a discrepancy between what my instructor showed me and what I found online: my teacher is having me play them on the 2, 3, and 4 strings, but most sources I can find show how to play triads on the 1, 2, and 3 strings.

Given my basic understanding of triads, I guess I intellectually understand that it could work either way, but I'm confused as to why my teacher is having me do them on the 2, 3, and 4 strings when the 1, 2, and 3 way seems to be more common.

Also, if it exists, could someone link me to some sort of triad explanation that is specific to the 2, 3, and 4 strings?

Thanks in advance, errbody.
He's a freak of nature, but we love him so.

Quote by John Frusciante
Music isn't the Olympics. It's not about showing other people what you can do with a piece of wood in your hands that has strings on, it's about making sounds that are good.
#2
I saw the thread title and thought you were looking for protection from a Chinese organised crime syndicate...

Short answer - the strings are irrelvant, you can play a triad anywhere you can find the notes it contains. However playing them on the strings 2, 3 and 4 will nicely corellate with E-shape barre chords.

Moved to MT because they like this sort of thing
Actually called Mark!

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#4
Quote by Spartan070sarge
Also, if it exists, could someone link me to some sort of triad explanation that is specific to the 2, 3, and 4 strings?

Thanks in advance, errbody.

As long as you understand which notes make up the triads, and you know where those notes are on the strings, you're all set.

C Am F G
--------
-8--10-10-12
-9--9--10-12
-10-10-10-12
--------
--------
#5
Err didn't he give you this so you could figure it out yourself?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#6
I wasn't looking for people to tab out the progressions, just a brief explanation of the theory behind triads. I get it now though. Thanks guys.
He's a freak of nature, but we love him so.

Quote by John Frusciante
Music isn't the Olympics. It's not about showing other people what you can do with a piece of wood in your hands that has strings on, it's about making sounds that are good.
#7
Quote by Spartan070sarge
He showed me one progression (C-F-C-G-F) in four positions, and then gave me two other progressions (C-Am-F-G and D-Bm-G-A) to figure out myself. While trying to Google triads for a little extra help, I discovered a discrepancy between what my instructor showed me and what I found online: my teacher is having me play them on the 2, 3, and 4 strings, but most sources I can find show how to play triads on the 1, 2, and 3 strings.
As a rank beginner, many times triad are taught on the top three strings, (I'm guessing) as a strength issue. (Or rather, a lack thereof). With the top strings of the guitar being as bright as they are, I'm also wondering if the issue is to develop the ear for proper tuning. Slightly out of tune is a bit more difficult to recognize in the bass.

Quote by Spartan070sarge
Given my basic understanding of triads, I guess I intellectually understand that it could work either way, but I'm confused as to why my teacher is having me do them on the 2, 3, and 4 strings when the 1, 2, and 3 way seems to be more common.
I suppose you could pick any 3 adjacent strings. Accordingly, you wouldn't be able to double any tones of a triad.

It's easier to play on the top strings of a guitar, than the bottoms. So, the end result of this exercise is, we'll get a mellower sound, and stronger hands......

Quote by steven seagull
Short answer - the strings are irrelvant, you can play a triad anywhere you can find the notes it contains. However playing them on the strings 2, 3 and 4 will nicely corellate with E-shape barre chords.
I would think to mesh with E major open we'd be playing on the 3, 4, & 5 strings... Unless we're simply not on the same page....
#8
Quote by Captaincranky

I would think to mesh with E major open we'd be playing on the 3, 4, & 5 strings... Unless we're simply not on the same page....

1st string is thinnest, no?

So root, 3rd and 5th sit sequentially on strings 4, 3, and 2
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#9
Quote by steven seagull
1st string is thinnest, no?
Firm grasp of the obvious, have you

Quote by steven seagull
So root, 3rd and 5th sit sequentially on strings 4, 3, and 2
A fact of which I'm also aware.

My question simply is how does any of this tie in to an E major shape barre chord. The shape exists on strings 3, 4, & 5. And it's voiced 5th, root, 3rd.

I do see your point than you can get 1, 3, 5 all the way up the neck by just adding the 1 finger where the bar would be. On the other hand, you would have to change the 3 string sets to voice anything else 1 ,3, 5.

It's just as easy to correlate G major on the 2, 3, & 4 strings with an "A Major" barre chord. Not sounded 1, 3, 5 however.

One expects it is all an endeavor to light that light bulb....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 10, 2012,
#10
E major chord.


e-0-  root (another octave)
B-0-  fifth (octave)
G-1-  third
D-2-  root (octave)
A-2-  fifth
E-0-  root


maybe I should have just said "E shape barre chord" as I wasn't intending it to be anything specific, just pointing out the TS that a sequential major triad on strings 4, 3 and 2 is just the middle three notes of a barre chord, obviously that holds true for minor triads too.

It's just an easy way to remember where the triads on the fretboard, I obviously don't know what he's being taught but I assumed if it's an introduction to triads then he'd have started off with the notes in sequence.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#11
Quote by Spartan070sarge
So I just started taking guitar lessons again after about four years of barely playing. I've decided to really dedicate myself to the instrument again.

Anyhow, my instructor started me off with a lesson on triads. I understand the basics of triads, three notes make up chords, and you can strip chords down to those three notes to make a triad chord. All good.

He showed me one progression (C-F-C-G-F) in four positions, and then gave me two other progressions (C-Am-F-G and D-Bm-G-A) to figure out myself. While trying to Google triads for a little extra help, I discovered a discrepancy between what my instructor showed me and what I found online: my teacher is having me play them on the 2, 3, and 4 strings, but most sources I can find show how to play triads on the 1, 2, and 3 strings.

Given my basic understanding of triads, I guess I intellectually understand that it could work either way, but I'm confused as to why my teacher is having me do them on the 2, 3, and 4 strings when the 1, 2, and 3 way seems to be more common.

Also, if it exists, could someone link me to some sort of triad explanation that is specific to the 2, 3, and 4 strings?

Thanks in advance, errbody.



Here is a chart of the various triads and there inversions on all sets of adjacent strings...

Triads
shred is gaudy music
#12
Quote by steven seagull
It's just an easy way to remember where the triads on the fretboard, I obviously don't know what he's being taught but I assumed if it's an introduction to triads then he'd have started off with the notes in sequence.
I probably shouldn't have even chimed in. The thread seems to be about second guessing his instructor, and getting us to do the assignment, one supposes not necessarily in that order.

With that out of the way, I guess guitar teachers come to know and fear those top three strings, being forced to listen to beginner's chord drills on them, day in, day out.

You could probably bump the whole mess down another string or two, it might just save a couple of hearing cells...
#13
Quote by Captaincranky
I probably shouldn't have even chimed in. The thread seems to be about second guessing his instructor, and getting us to do the assignment, one supposes not necessarily in that order.


Jesus, man. I'd already figured out the triads in the positions anyway. I was just looking to read up more about them and got confused with the difference in string use. I don't know that much theory, so I thought I'd ask people who did. I'm not trying to question my teacher's knowledge, nor am I trying to get anyone else to do my assignments. I was just looking for a little theoretical help from people who know what they're talking about. Pardon me.
He's a freak of nature, but we love him so.

Quote by John Frusciante
Music isn't the Olympics. It's not about showing other people what you can do with a piece of wood in your hands that has strings on, it's about making sounds that are good.
#14
Quote by Spartan070sarge
Jesus, man. I'd already figured out the triads in the positions anyway. I was just looking to read up more about them and got confused with the difference in string use. I don't know that much theory, so I thought I'd ask people who did. I'm not trying to question my teacher's knowledge
I never said you were trying to question his knowledge, nor am I. What I said was, we were second guessing his methods. Forcing you down the fretboard, (IMO), is a good idea
Quote by Spartan070sarge
Jesus, man. I'd already figured out the triads in the nor am I trying to get anyone else to do my assignments.
That was an ill conceived and ill thought out remark on my part, and I apologize for it. In my defense, if you follow this forum, we get countless threads asking why I have to learn "XXX", or how can I get around learning "XXX", but best of all, I don't feel like learning "XXX". I say if "XXX" can get around needing to learn, "XXX" more power to them. But, I generally choose not to bother with participating. I can avoid "XXX" as well as the next person. Some questions are simply too broad in scope. For example, "how can I solo on my guitar". Really, how the f*** I know...
Quote by Spartan070sarge
I was just looking for a little theoretical help from people who know what they're talking about.
When you ask for theoretical help on basic theory, it always opens up a can of worms, and you wind up getting 20 different correct answers. At which point the TS gets over saturated.

I think basic theory, what is the chromatic scale, how to form a major scale from it, how to extract the chords from that scale, and why a note is called sharp or flat, all have to be learned simultaneously.

Once those concepts click for you, it'll stay with you forever. You learn which chords are major or minor for every key, all at once.

The trouble with attempting to get the grasp of it in a forum context, is as simple as the old "too many cooks" adage. Well, that, and the scope is too broad. What actually happens is you get 20 different bits and pieces of a larger correct answer, with each individual's spin on them.

Forming basic triads can be explained thusly, " a major triad is formed with a major 3rd, and a minor 3rd. A minor triad is a minor 3rd first, then a major 3rd. True enough. But it's a phenomenon of forming those chords from a major scale.

If you take the time to sit down with a major scale in tonal spacing form, those patterns emerge as you overlay your chord voicings.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 10, 2012,
#15
Quote by Spartan070sarge
I was just looking to read up more about them and got confused with the difference in string use. I don't know that much theory, so I thought I'd ask people who did. I'm not trying to question my teacher's knowledge, nor am I trying to get anyone else to do my assignments. I was just looking for a little theoretical help from people who know what they're talking about. Pardon me.

Do you know why triads are called "triads?". Yes, they have 3 notes which you already know, but it's how those notes are built in terms of their intervals. Do you understand intervals?
#16
Quote by Captaincranky
A buncha stuff


No worries. I understand that you guys probably get people asking to do their stuff for them pretty often. I was really just looking for a more in-depth explanation of what I was learning and why I was learning it, so thank you for your part in that.

Quote by mdc
Do you know why triads are called "triads?". Yes, they have 3 notes which you already know, but it's how those notes are built in terms of their intervals. Do you understand intervals?


Once again, I've heard the term, have a rough idea of what it is, I'd recognize it if I saw it on paper, but I don't really understand intervals that well. For example, when I hear that a chord is composed of a root note, a 3rd, and a 5th, well I know what the root note of any given chord is, but I have no clue how you get the 3rd and 5th.
He's a freak of nature, but we love him so.

Quote by John Frusciante
Music isn't the Olympics. It's not about showing other people what you can do with a piece of wood in your hands that has strings on, it's about making sounds that are good.
#17
Well I don't know how your teacher expects you to find the triads on the B D and G strings if he hasn't taught you intervals yet. Let alone the other strings.
#19
^ That is the order I recommend to any beginner. +1