#1
So basically I opened up the cavity of my Epi Les Paul Classic and noticed the cavity was painted black. I know that if the cavity is painted black on a Gibson it is usually a fake and I'm curious if it's just an Epiphone thing or whether I have a fake.

Thanks in advance
#2
My epi is the same. It might be conductive paint they're using, which if it is, its not a bad idea.
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#3
you're worried you might have a fake epiphone?
.
Capitalization is the difference between "I helped my Uncle Jack off the horse" and "i helped my uncle jack off the horse"
Quote by stepchildusmc
either way your gonna need a big bucket... how you set it under the horse is up to you.
#4
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
My epi is the same. It might be conductive paint they're using, which if it is, its not a bad idea.
Don't know if it would outperform good old fashioned copper sheeting though.
Quote by mike_oxbig
you're worried you might have a fake epiphone?
Shit, now you both have me worried. I gotta rush off and check if both of my Ibanez are on the up and up.....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 10, 2012,
#5
Epiphone use conductive paint, which happens to be black.

Vs copper, paint technically isn't as effective but when you're talking about reducing stray hum in a guitar you're talking about protecting against a very small problem, which the paint can handle. If you're picking up hum or interference that conductive pain doesn't shield you against then it's probably something copper tape wouldn't beat either. In a good hi-fi system you wouldn't use conductive paint but in a guitar paint is, for all intents and purposes, as good as tape.
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#6
After looking through old pictures, my epi custom had the cavities painted black as well.

It's probably to hide the fact that the "maple top" is 1/16th of an inch thick and the "solid" "mahogany" is 40% glue
.
Capitalization is the difference between "I helped my Uncle Jack off the horse" and "i helped my uncle jack off the horse"
Quote by stepchildusmc
either way your gonna need a big bucket... how you set it under the horse is up to you.
#7
or flibble might be onto something as well.

but i still think my version is very plausible
.
Capitalization is the difference between "I helped my Uncle Jack off the horse" and "i helped my uncle jack off the horse"
Quote by stepchildusmc
either way your gonna need a big bucket... how you set it under the horse is up to you.
#8
Gibson used that black conductive paint up until 2008 or so. It makes sense that epiphone would do the same.
#10
Quote by Roc8995
Gibson used that black conductive paint up until 2008 or so. It makes sense that epiphone would do the same.

I don't believe so in my '76 Les Paul's case.
#11
Quote by MrFlibble
Epiphone use conductive paint, which happens to be black.

Vs copper, paint technically isn't as effective but when you're talking about reducing stray hum in a guitar you're talking about protecting against a very small problem, which the paint can handle. If you're picking up hum or interference that conductive pain doesn't shield you against then it's probably something copper tape wouldn't beat either. In a good hi-fi system you wouldn't use conductive paint but in a guitar paint is, for all intents and purposes, as good as tape.


Ah, that makes sense. Thanks man.

Quote by mike_oxbig
you're worried you might have a fake epiphone?

Wasn't really worried, just curious. It seemed unlikely that someone would fake an Epiphone so I was kind of confused.
#12
I believe its actual purpose is to cover up the fact that they build Epiphones of many, many pieces of wood glued together with a whole bucket of glue, and then put a veneer on top and back if it is a clear finish (yes, the backs of the LP Standards, G400 and such is also veneered).
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#13
Quote by HomerSGR
I believe its actual purpose is to cover up the fact that they build Epiphones of many, many pieces of wood glued together with a whole bucket of glue, and then put a veneer on top and back if it is a clear finish (yes, the backs of the LP Standards, G400 and such is also veneered).

Pics, or it doesn't exist, Mr. Fact.
#14
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epiphone_G-400

The G-400 front and back are most certainly veneered.

I know the tops on their LPs are as well for the figured bursts, but I can't speak for the backs.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#15
i was very plesd to seemy epi is sheilded.

iwas also dissapointed i cant see the wood. oh well. tradeoff.
#16
Quote by bubb_tubbs
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epiphone_G-400

The G-400 front and back are most certainly veneered.

I know the tops on their LPs are as well for the figured bursts, but I can't speak for the backs.
Because everything on Wikipedia is 100% factually accurate.

The G-400s aren't veneered, anyone with working eyes can see that. That's part of the beauty of SGs, the side bevels make it basically impossible to conceal the core wood. A few Epiphone SGs have had veneers to give the appearance of figured wood of various kinds, but never mahogany veneers. Adding a veneer of african mahogany would cost more than the rest of the body was worth. you're talking about something which A) simply doesn't happen, and B) even if it did would slow production and raise costs considerably.

As someone who's gutted more Epiphones than he can remember, allow me to impart this (admittedly completely anecdotal) wisdom: every Epiphone LP and SG I've handled has had a 3- or 4-piece body (not counting tops and neck). The wood is a cheap mahogany; I've observed older models using nato and odd forms of alder. I can't name the specific species I've seen in new models beyond that it looks like a less attractive and lighter-coloured type of mahogany. The only veneers I've ever observed have been flame, quilt, birdseye, spalt and plain maple, put over less attractive pieces of rock maple. Epiphone use shielding pain in their control cavities, and to their credit the poly finishes on the backs of their LPs tends to be on the thin side, though the finish on the tops of their LPs and all over their SGs seem to be consistently thicker. Carved tops seem to usually be 3-piece. I've observed 1-piece, 2-piece and 3-piece neck stocks, made of the same ''mahogany'' that the bodies are made of. Fretboards are obviously 1-piece rosewood/ebony/maple, as applicable.

As I said, that's all entirely anecdotal evidence and Epiphone have been around for many decades so of course there are going to be exceptions and differences in many guitars. But that's how the Epiphones I've stripped, modded and gutted have all been built.
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#17
Quote by MrFlibble
Because everything on Wikipedia is 100% factually accurate.

For stuff that has proper sourcing and actually matters (i.e. not shitty guitar manufacturers) it is.

It's a particularly excellent way to gather scientific or historical references for papers so you can read them yourself and reference them.

Unfortunately you are correct in this particular instance because there are no bibliographical references or photographs.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#18
Quote by Buck's Student
I don't believe so in my '76 Les Paul's case.

Not sure when it started. They had it all through the 90s based on the ones I've opened. Seems like an addition that may have happened during or just after the Norlin years.
#19
Quote by MrFlibble
Because everything on Wikipedia is 100% factually accurate.

The G-400s aren't veneered, anyone with working eyes can see that. That's part of the beauty of SGs, the side bevels make it basically impossible to conceal the core wood. A few Epiphone SGs have had veneers to give the appearance of figured wood of various kinds, but never mahogany veneers. Adding a veneer of african mahogany would cost more than the rest of the body was worth. you're talking about something which A) simply doesn't happen, and B) even if it did would slow production and raise costs considerably.

..........


Sorry, that is not true !

Actually the only NOT veneered Epi SG is (was) the 'faded G400 vintage' model, which also has a bound neck....

http://www.epiphone.com/News-Features/News/2004/Vintage-G-400--Why-Is-This-Guitar-Shaking-Up-The-I.aspx

many other Epi SGs do have veneer on the front and backside

http://epiphonewiki.com/index.php?title=SG
Last edited by paruwi at Feb 12, 2012,
#20
1) Plain no
2) Again, lolwiki
3) Again, use your own eyes and just look at one of these guitars for yourself. It's ridiculously easy to see which guitars have a veneer and which don't. Unless of course you don't know what veneers look like, in which case you shouldn't be commenting in the first place.
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#21
Quote by MrFlibble
1) Plain no
2) Again, lolwiki
3) Again, use your own eyes and just look at one of these guitars for yourself. It's ridiculously easy to see which guitars have a veneer and which don't. Unless of course you don't know what veneers look like, in which case you shouldn't be commenting in the first place.



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