#1
Hi guys.I started playing classical guitar about 2 months ago.I dont have a teacher.I am practising alone.Now i have learned some basic chords and i can play some songs.All i learned using the internet.What i want from the begining is to learn to play electric guitar.I will start in summer but should i get a teacher???Is electric guitar easier than classical???I am 18 years old.Is it too late to learn guitar???
#2
Classical guitar is an entirely different animal. It's a different approach to playing guitar. Even the guitars are different.

If you have the motivation, I think you could start off with either, but having an instructor is a good idea. An instructor will prevent you from making mistakes that turn into bad habits.

You're never too old to learn to play guitar.
#3
1) I would personally recommend getting a teacher but it's up to you really
2) Neither is easier than the other, but the mechanics of playing each are quite different, especially in terms of picking
3) Nope, it's not too late at all
Good luck man
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#4
Guitar and Music are a life long journey. It is never too late to start.

That being said, Paddy McK is spot on by saying that neither is easier, but just different.

As a teacher for 7 years, I've had some very accomplished players come in as students who had never had a formal lesson and fixed some fundamental problems with their playing. I highly suggest everyone goes in for lessons every now and again.

I hope this helps!
#5
For me it depends how 'good' you want to be. For example, I have never had a lesson, and I'm sure the technically skilled among you here could rip my technique to shreds, but I know what I'm doing, can play everything I want really quite easily and can bring ideas to my band, so I'm fine with my 'problems', they're just how I play. But if you want to shred well, or play jazz and classical to a high standard, I think you would benefit from a teacher.
Dude, where's my band?
#6
Hey pankar94 you condition reminds me when i wanted to learn electric guitar at the age of 19 .My dad brought me the acoustic one but within 6 months i bought an electric one and the fact that you learn buy your self is good but better get one instructor if you still wanna practice by your self try "Licklibrary" the some good instructional video's for beginners.
Good Luck man )
#7
But if i play something with the wrong way and it sounds the same with the right way,what's the matter???
#9
Playing something the right will always be better. Depending on what you are planning on doing if you don't do it right you could end up with serious hand injuries that can cripple your playing.

And also, playing guitar never works for just doing professional. If it's not fun to you then it just won't work.
#10
Quote by pankar94
But if i play something with the wrong way and it sounds the same with the right way,what's the matter???



Playing something wrong might mean that you're not being as efficient as you could be. Playing guitar is all about efficiency. The more efficient you are, the better your speed and accuracy are - this means you have the potential to sound better. You might also play something in a manner that makes it harder than it has to be. Lessons can certainly help. Does everyone need them? Not necessarily.

So, does that mean that every professional player took lessons and plays perfect technique? Nope. There are a lot of self-taught pro musicians who never took a lesson and play quite well. Do they use accepted technique when they play? Not always.

I know guys who are self-taught and play very well. The one thing they won't do is teach guitar. My brother is one of them. He has played for probably 25 years and plays very well, but he was self-taught. He thought about teaching a few years ago and auditioned at a place for an instructor position. They didn't hire him, because his technique was poor.

All depends on what you want to do. If you think you can learn on your own, then have at it. You may do quite well.

Good luck!
#11
While I agree a teacher is important, we live in an age where access to information makes it much easier to learn guitar than ever before. I took a few lessons, but I found a lot of my technique comes from watching my favourite guitarists and what they do. I like to think I have a good technique, but even so, not everyone will play the same. John Petrucci anchors his pinky which is a major technical no-no but he can shred 99% of peoples' faces off. I like to think of a guitar teacher like a personal trainer. Do you absolutely need one? No. But its nice to have someone to provide you with resources and ride your ass to make sure you aren't slacking off.
#12
Quote by thelordofdarkch
Playing something the right will always be better. Depending on what you are planning on doing if you don't do it right you could end up with serious hand injuries that can cripple your playing.

And also, playing guitar never works for just doing professional. If it's not fun to you then it just won't work.

I dont mean that when i say not for fun.I am crazy about playing guitar.I like it so much.I mean tha i want to learn guitar and try be better and better and if i can find a band later.
#13
Quote by shredder3386
While I agree a teacher is important, we live in an age where access to information makes it much easier to learn guitar than ever before. I took a few lessons, but I found a lot of my technique comes from watching my favourite guitarists and what they do. I like to think I have a good technique, but even so, not everyone will play the same. John Petrucci anchors his pinky which is a major technical no-no but he can shred 99% of peoples' faces off. I like to think of a guitar teacher like a personal trainer. Do you absolutely need one? No. But its nice to have someone to provide you with resources and ride your ass to make sure you aren't slacking off.


I don´t like to think of a teacher as a personal trainer but as a musical educator. Learning an instrument does not make sense if you don´t get any music education(history, overwiew about the literature for the instrument, theory, musical expression... )
Yes it´s easy to get valuable information these days using the internet, but if you are going completely on your own as an immature player its very likely that you can´t differ the 1% of valuable content from the 99% junk. I believe this is the reason for the high fraction of guitar players that play mainly show pieces in low quality without any musical expression.
#14
Quote by Facecut
I don´t like to think of a teacher as a personal trainer but as a musical educator. Learning an instrument does not make sense if you don´t get any music education(history, overwiew about the literature for the instrument, theory, musical expression... )
Yes it´s easy to get valuable information these days using the internet, but if you are going completely on your own as an immature player its very likely that you can´t differ the 1% of valuable content from the 99% junk. I believe this is the reason for the high fraction of guitar players that play mainly show pieces in low quality without any musical expression.


Hmm interesting arguement, I get where you are coming from. But I also believe that if people have the drive they can discover those things on their own. Music history and theory can all be learned from books or other sources. Also sometimes being naive to those things can be a useful. I personally like to learn all I can, but some players including the great Stevie Ray Vaughan had no formal music training and only studied great blues musicians. I think not knowing can sometimes be useful so you more open to experimenting and not just copying what people have done before you. Either way I agree with you as well and I guess it just depends on the person and what kind of player they want to be.
#15
Quote by pankar94
I want to play guitar professionally and not for fun.

You HAVE to play for fun, because if it's not fun you're not going to get anywhere with it in the first place. And even then, no matter how good you get there's zero guarantees that guitar will ever be anything more than a hobby - whether you get to do it professionally involves knowing the right people, being in the right place at the right time, having a face and style that fits and generally a lot of luck.

Play, practice, get as good as you can and treat any opportunities that come your way as a bonus.
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#16
The first thing you need to do is get a grammar tutor to show you how to use the english language. Texting has just completely ****ed our society.

Yes, get a teacher. Yes, classical guitar is much harder than electric guitar. Either one takes years to become truly proficient, but electric is much easier in the beginner to intermediate stages. For classical guitar, it's almost a necessity to get a teacher or very, very large amounts of books and DVDs.