#1
I was playing around in a d minor chord progression, and as you guys know the fifth chord is A minor. But I found when trying to end with a V to I cadence, the A major to D minor on the guitar sounded better than A minor to D minor. I'm just wondering, is this some bull theory that I made up or is it seen in a lot of music.

Edit: hang on, the resolution from C# to D is seen in the harmonic minor scale, But my question about its presence in music is what I'm wondering still
Last edited by esp 4 life at Feb 12, 2012,
#2
A major is derived from the harmonic minor scale. Yes it definitely creates a stronger resolution, I assume it is because the G# employed in the A major scale wants to pull towards the A stronger than the G employed in the natural minor scale. I'll assume this is because G# is closer to A chromatically than the G.
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#3
The V-i cadence is quite common. The V chord has a much stronger resolution towards the tonic because of its raised 3rd. In your case, the C# of the A major chord is also the 7th of the D major scale, which as a better pull towards the tonic than the m7th in the natural minor scale.

This is also the reason why the harmonic minor scale gets it name. The V-i relationship makes for better harmony in a minor key.
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#4
The old Stones tune, "Paint it Black" uses that progression. (Although it's a V7).

That may be a double harmonic minor scale though. My father always told me to, "turn that shit off. it sounds like a Jewish chant".

So, double harmonic minor it is then.... (!) or perhaps (?)
#5
Quote by Captaincranky
The old Stones tune, "Paint it Black" uses that progression. (Although it's a V7).

That may be a double harmonic minor scale though. My father always told me to, "turn that shit off. it sounds like a Jewish chant".

So, double harmonic minor it is then.... (!) or perhaps (?)


LOLZ

But yeah, The V-I/i creates a much stronger resolution than v-I/i, because you incorporate the leading tone of the key.
#7
Thanks guys for the responses, follow up question, what other chords work well taken from the parallel major/minor keys, is it a matter of they all work well but to transition between them, that's the hard part?

Edit: would it work to interplay the parallel minor of a major, a minor and the relative minor of A major, F# minor. But in thinking that, doesn't jimmy page do that in the communication breakdown solo when switching from e minor to c# minor
Last edited by esp 4 life at Feb 15, 2012,
#8
When writing chord progressions in minor, you can use natural, harmonic and melodic all at the same time. You don't need to think in terms of "either natural OR harmonic". Do what sounds good.