#1
Hi guys! While I suck at guitar technique, I've been digging deep in theory for a couple of months. I've read and studied everything I can regarding music theory, every thread in UG, every lesson at justinguitar and I downloaded a counterpoint book as well. I love classical music and jazz improvisation as well...

I'm kind of tired about reading major/minor/harmonic/melodic scales, modes and chord theory, I already know those back and forth, but it isn't really helping me during my improvisations/compositions in jazz! I would really like to study how to explore cadences and progressions chromatically, I love how bossanova mixes every kind of chord into beautiful progressions, as well as intricate melody lines.

I would like to learn simple modifications you can apply to cadences to make them sound different and interesting, such as adding a iv instead of IV, III instead of iii, ii-V-i turn arounds, half-diminished chords in-between minor chord transitions, etc.

Thanks!
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#2
How's your application of these concepts? Otherwise I don't know what you want, you've stated straight out what you want to learn....did you want an online forum to teach you?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
Not at all, I just want some online lesson suggestions from other players to learn more about comping.
Fender Jaguar -> Polytune -> Diamond Compressor -> Timmy -> OCD -> Big Muff -> Line 6 M9 -> Sonomatic Cheddar -> Spark boost -> Fender BDRI
#4
check out the Hal Crook How To Improvise book. I don't think it will help you with everything you stated but if you want to explore improvisation then there really isn't anything better, this book is unlike any other book.

And if you don't already have it, I hope you do, get yourself a real book. Jazz players are hard to come by on the UG forums and the few times I have seen them they don't have a RB. If you know how to play chords in different voicings and all that then you'll be fine. The best way to get better at comping is to just play with other people. To me, comping well is 10x harder than soloing
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#5
'The answers to all your questions are right there in your bedroom.'

Transcribing is the best thing to learn jazz. Listen to good guitarists/pianists for comping advice, and pretty much any solo you like for soloing advice.

Write it down, analyze it in a way that makes sense to you.
If something doesn't make sense, learn the theory behind it that you're missing, or ask someone who does know.

Whilst jazz has become very academic over the past 30 years, it wasn't always like that. Listen to the old guys, who learned by ear, and follow in their footsteps.

EDIT: this might be seen as spam, I don't know. Sorry if it is.

But almost everything Jake's written in this thread is brilliant, and there are a few other decent jazz players chipping in as well:

http://forums.allaboutjazz.com/showthread.php?t=30292
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Big deal, I bought a hamster once and they put that in a box...doesn't make it a scale.
Last edited by yM.Samurai at Feb 13, 2012,
#6
Quote by Svennz
Not at all, I just want some online lesson suggestions from other players to learn more about comping.


Well you said you knew about keys, tell me the key of and what scale/s you'd play over the following progressions.

Am - F - C - G

Am - F - B7 - E - A

Am - F - E7 - D
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#7
We have an online Academy that specializes on Music Theory and Fretboard knowledge and navigation applied to the guitar, that can be recalled in real time - all the skills, for example, you see a G minor 9 coming, and you want to do a chord tone approach to it, how do you decide in real time, how to approach that chord tone, with your target note correctly known, before the chord changes, or as the chord changes? This is the kind of skill set that we build into the Academy student:

1. He knows the key he's in and is playing diatonic or maybe using some outside notes for tension
2. He sees the Gmin 9 coming
3. He knows the notes of a Gmin 9 are G Bb D F and A - instantly, in that second
4. He knows the notes on the neck and knows/sees any Bb since he has decided to make Bb his target note in the change (or maybe he's decided to go to the A and articulate a nice 1/2 step approach bend)

All of this the student sees and learns to not only play in real time, but he can articulate himself correctly in real time. Musical theory aspects are transferrable to universal instruments, this is what I mean in real-time application of a theoretical concept. Knowledge and execution.

If you'd like to learn more about what we do, or would like a course catalog, shoot me a PM here or click on the link in my sig. I'll do my best to answer any questions you might have.

Best,

Sean