#1
I have some questions.If a tab says to put a capo on fret 2 and and then it says to play fret 1 how am i suppose to do that???and will learning chords help with your finger placements/accuracy to help play a song faster?? thank you for answering
#2
Quote by music99
I have some questions.If a tab says to put a capo on fret 2 and and then it says to play fret 1 how am i suppose to do that???and will learning chords help with your finger placements/accuracy to help play a song faster?? thank you for answering


When a tab says play THIS fret, or fret 1 in your case, you normally count the frets from the top of the neck (fret 0 or open string) going closer to the guitar body, fret 1,fret2,fret10 and so on. If you have a capo on the guitar, than fret 0 is the fret which is capo'ed.
So, to play fret 1 on your guitar when you have your capo on fret 2 you actually play fret 3 WITHOUT capo.
I don't know if you got this but I don't know how to explain it different..

I'm in a hurry to answer about chords, but I'm sure someone will explain it to you

Cheers
#3
I'm going to say, it's better to try to and play whatever tab you're interested in, to verify that the key is correct.

My experience has been different people tab differently, when dealing with a capoed guitar.

Some people give the chords in the actual key, but give a chord diagram for the chord in the open position.

Playing a G major open, gives you an A major, with a capo at the second fret. This is as it should be. Since C, F, G open would become D, G A, capo at two.

I really don't know if people allow the lead riff tab to be affected by the rhythm guitar being capoed.

Common open chords can be pulled up the neck, either with a bar or a single finger being moved. G and C major open are effective used this way, as well as the E and A major barre voices.

However C & G major are particularly effective in determining whether a capo is in place or not. Since G, C, D, (the I, IV, V of G major), is so common. They key is sometimes pulled up to accommodate the singers vocal comfort zone.

C major open would be voiced thus, as a movable chord.


E-6 x
A-5 4
D-4 3
G-3 1
B-2 2
E-1 x

The resultant chord I've shown is Db Major, or C major pulled up one fret, with NO capo.

Open voices pulled up the neck, are my best way of determining whether or not a capo is being used.

My best guess as to your specific situation is to assume the capo is the "zero fret", then count from there. If it doesn't work out as being correct, then assume the rhythm guitar is capoed, and the lead guitar is not.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 12, 2012,
#4
Wow quick reply.Ty brain nice explanation.captain dont rlly get it dont get it when u say a G major becomes an A major with a capo at the 2nd fret.
#5
Quote by music99
Wow quick reply.Ty brain nice explanation.captain dont rlly get it dont get it when u say a G major becomes an A major with a capo at the 2nd fret.
If you play a G major open chord, then you place a capo on the second fret and play the same G major chord form (G major "shape", if you prefer), you're actually playing an A major chord.

Each fret is a half tone up the chromatic scale. A is 2 half tones up from G. (Actually 2 half tones equal a whole tone, the preferred way of stating that.)

I'm not exactly sure what's not to get.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 12, 2012,
#6
what he's trying to say is that 1 on a tab is a 1 in relation to the capo, not the nut
#7
Your capo becomes the nut. So, if you capo at the 2nd fret and play a normal "G" chord position, it will sound as "A".
Note that when you get a tab that indicates a capo position, that means the artist who played the song was trying to accommodate his own voice.
It may not suit yours....

For instance, I'm working on the bluegrass tune "Randall Collins". Norman Blake plays this in "G" (E-minor, actually) position with the capo at the 3rd fret to give an actual key of B-flat.
That doesn't work for me; Norman's voice is higher than mine. So, I use the same chords but play with the capo at the first fret to give me A-flat....

Or, you could just transpose the song into another key... Say "C" which might suit your voice better.

That's what the capo is for; allowing you to keep a chord progression you know without transposing the song into awkward or difficult-to-play keys.

You don't see a lot of bluegrass guys playing in A-flat or E-flat.
Last edited by Bikewer at Feb 13, 2012,