#1
Well, i hit the point where just knowing the scale patterns isn't enough. I guess i should have been learning the notes all along, but it's too late now. So, what is the best way to learn all the notes on the fretboard? I'm thinking maybe to 3 frets for all the string eveyday for a month? Any tips?
#2
...

Dude. You do realise that the notes aren't scattered all over the place right?

As long as you know your alphabet and what note each string is tuned to you're fine. It's not like 12th fret E string is an E and then the next note along is like an A# or some shit.
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#3
I had the same problem, the best way I learned was the first five frets first, considering that they repeat themselves over the next strings
#4
break the fret board up into positions. learn the root of each string, then learn root-5th fret, 6th-10th fret, then 11 to the octave. also try to find every note in every octave. if you have a lick, find all the positions you can do it in. i also found that its best just to forget about accidentals and think of them as either the sharp or flat.

and work in incrementalism. say the notes out, write them down, what ever you need to do to remember them.
#5
Tattoo them in your arm.

No, seriously, it'll work, I promise.


Or you could just say them out loud, one at a time (every day, first with sharps and then back down with flats), and follow what the guy above me said, doing it the first five frets at a time.
#6
play guitar a lot. There's really no rush. Trust me, if you play enough, you'll learn them without really trying.
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#7
Hey,
I've tried so many different methods. I'll list them because while they didn't work for me, they may work for you. Then I'll put the one that worked for me last:

Joe Satriani's Method
Set a metronome to 60. Choose a note, for example E. Play every E on the guitar in time to the metronome while gradually increasing the speed.

An online method
- Focus on the dotted frets, once you get those fill in the gaps
Or
- Learn the notes vertically, fret by fret

Digital Flash Cards
I made some images in paint that had different note names on them and then "answer" images such as '2nd fret E string' etc. I then put these in windows movie maker with the note names first then the answer images following and played it like a movie. When the first card came up, say G on the 6th string, I'd try and immediately go to that G and then the next 'answer' image would tell me if I got it right it or not.

^There is nothing wrong with these methods. The reason it didn't work for me is because my self discipline isn't the best, I am quite lazy. It's very easy to lose interest in something that takes a long time to get, especially when it's something as tedious as learning all the frets on the guitar.

The way that worked for me
I took up a music course last year and one of our classes was improvising over jazz standards which meant learning LOTS of chords. A lot of 7ths and minor 7ths. These chords have the same shape, you just move them around. So to be able to keep up with the music, I really had to learn where all the notes were along the A and E string to hit the right chords. And because you're playing along to music, it makes it interesting and enjoyable.

Autumn Leaves is a good one to start with.

Anyway I hope that helps a little, good luck!
#8
The lowest 2 strings (E & A) should be easy to remember as that's where the root notes for bar chords are, along with the high E which is the same as the low E. If you don't know these, I have no idea how you manage. When I started out, these were easy to learn and remember.

The G and B strings were a little tougher but I eventually learned them by playing and practicing triads. The best way, I find, is to practice and play basic chords and learn how they're formed rather than just memorizing which fret is which string is A#. It'll come with time. Also, learn your intervals.
#9
Quote by Alysoun

The way that worked for me
I took up a music course last year and one of our classes was improvising over jazz standards which meant learning LOTS of chords. A lot of 7ths and minor 7ths. These chords have the same shape, you just move them around. So to be able to keep up with the music, I really had to learn where all the notes were along the A and E string to hit the right chords. And because you're playing along to music, it makes it interesting and enjoyable.


I agree that improvisation really helped me progress with my fretboard. Learning the notes of a particular key and then trying to stay in that key over a chord progression while being concious of any accidentals you use is a great way that's also fun at the same time.

Sometimes I use the Joe Satriani method and games like fretboard warrior as well but those are more just re-affirming what I already learned through improvisation.
#10
Quote by Lightning.Rider
I agree that improvisation really helped me progress with my fretboard. Learning the notes of a particular key and then trying to stay in that key over a chord progression while being concious of any accidentals you use is a great way that's also fun at the same time.


Exactly! I didn't acknowledge the improv part, you're right it helps as well. The thought process is like, "Ok, at the improv section> D Dorian> Where do I start? 5th fret A String". But finding the note is just one part of it, I was absolutely terrible in this class. Having a teacher that completely ripped you apart when you made a mistake didn't help at all.
#11
Quote by Twistedrock
...

Dude. You do realise that the notes aren't scattered all over the place right?

As long as you know your alphabet and what note each string is tuned to you're fine. It's not like 12th fret E string is an E and then the next note along is like an A# or some shit.


Lol judging by your answer you probably still dont know them cold in less than 3 seconds so dont act like he asked sth stupid, you answered sth stupid.
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Last edited by Slashiepie at Feb 13, 2012,
#12
better suited to MT
Actually called Mark!

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#14
A Useful tool to learn the notes is using Octaves patterns.

For Example, if you have a G in the third fret of your E String (low and High), you have another on the Five fret of the D string and the 8th of the B.

In fact, you can do a Power chord pattern but just skipping a string starting in the 6th and 5th String for localize a note.

And in the D string and G you can do a Minor Sixth diagram (but skipping the middle string).

I hope it might help you
#16
The way we teach it at the Academy. In all honesty, in my opinion, having played for 26 years and taught for well over a decade, it's one of the best ways I've ever head of, and definitely one of the fastest, in terms of a student being able to use it in real time, and by that I mean, in 2 seconds or less. That's not me simply marketing what we do; it's straight up my honest and total conviction.

Anyways, barring that idea, in case you're not looking to invest of yourself in terms of money towards the skill, there's a program out there on the internet called "Fretboard Warrior" that is free, and you can try your hand at using that to drill the notes. I can't tell you anything more about it because I've never used it or needed it, but I know a lot of people here have.

There's also another program out there called "Absolute Fretboard Trainer" that I have seen and that one was pretty good from what I could tell.

Best,

Sean
#17
One of the best ways for me is the Satriani method. Set the metronome and pick a note you want to learn. Then find all notes on the beat. Increasing the tempo makes it harder because you have to really know where the notes are.

Learn arpeggios. Learn all the different arpeggio shapes. This is another method I used that helped learn the fretboard.