#1
I have a problem with one thing when playing with a metronome:
I Don't know how to learn playing pauses. What I mea is in some songs you have to play a note BEETWEEN metronome thicks without playing a notes at the thicks.
For example: intro riff form "everytime I die" by Children Of Bodom or "****ing hostile" Pantera. Could somebody give me a first, simple rythm excercise, so I could learn it, and then, having a first step, just I'm gonne be able to create my own excercises (like I usually do).
#2
If you have to play notes between the beats, and not on them, then I'd suggest hitting the notes with upstrokes. Then when your picking hand goes downwards it will feel like "playing" a rest on the beat. I haven't looked up those songs to see if the technique would really fit there, but there's my suggestion.
#4
Well, in theory, every note/rest is part of beat. So, say the measure you're playing is in 4/4. Even if there's 8th notes, each one is still counted out. Typically speaking, using the previous example would mean counting 8th notes as 1-AND 2-AND, at an 8th note tempo.

Yes, it can be confusing and adding the metronome ticking away to that can make it really frustrating, but I find the easiest way to determine the beat is to look at the piece of music and figure out where each note lies on which beat, whether it be the main beat or an "AND" beat.
#5
Play with a drum machine instead of a metronome?

I find that its a lot easier to play/practice to a simple drum beat than it is to slave away in the woodshed with a metronome.
Axes:
2010 Carvin ST300C
1994 Jackson Soloist XL Professional
2008 "Jacksbanez"
2007 Gibson Flying V
2003 Epiphone Les Paul Plus

Amps:
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Peavey Classic 30
Peavey Vypyr 15
#7
If you are serious about learning to play off-beats and all that goodie stuff... check out this video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Sw_trDFJw8
It's a video from a Victor Wooten DVD...it's pretty much the ultimate basis for rhythm exercises imho.
Watch it...try it...and make your own exercises from it afterwards.
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#9
@Macabre_Turtle:
I think You understood it well, your answer gave me a lot, anyway, the point is, in these songs you have riffs like: eights and sixteens in one measure. It's thing I got to learn t play after playing stuff like all eights in a measure, etc.
#10
If you have guitar pro you could easily make some rhythm exercises. I have tons of em. like switching from quarter notes to eight notes, from eight notes to quarter notes, from from quarter notes triplets to eight notes. Tons of em, ranging from quarter notes to sixteen notes triplets. With pauses in some examples. It works wonders for your head.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#11
I use guitar pro usually, the thing is, what I wanna do is to learn using only my ears and metronome (what I do not because of using GP). If it's about learning melodies by ear, I'm gonna do it myself, the problems apears with rythm.
Why I don't use GP for this? I just think that, when I'm gonna learn some rythm on GP, I'm not gonna be able to play it by the motronome.
Anyway, take a look at this from this point: How did Slash learnt to play or Yngwie, Dimebag - there was no tabs or GP back in 70's or 80's, huh?
I of course realise these are not 80's, that's way I'm gonna probably use GP after failing at trying to learn at metronome only (or not)

Uff! that was a long one!
#12
Quote by zyx32
I use guitar pro usually, the thing is, what I wanna do is to learn using only my ears and metronome (what I do not because of using GP). If it's about learning melodies by ear, I'm gonna do it myself, the problems apears with rythm.
Why I don't use GP for this? I just think that, when I'm gonna learn some rythm on GP, I'm not gonna be able to play it by the motronome.
Anyway, take a look at this from this point: How did Slash learnt to play or Yngwie, Dimebag - there was no tabs or GP back in 70's or 80's, huh?
I of course realise these are not 80's, that's way I'm gonna probably use GP after failing at trying to learn at metronome only (or not)

Uff! that was a long one!


Actually tabulature goes back to at least the 15th century according to wiki. I remember seeing play books at the guitar shop in the late sixtys with tab but since I had been reading standard notation for years before I picked up a guitar thats what I'd always use. I like using the virtual fretboard in GP because seeing the standard notation when I fret a note has really helped reinforce the fretboard map.
#13
Quote by zyx32
I use guitar pro usually, the thing is, what I wanna do is to learn using only my ears and metronome (what I do not because of using GP). If it's about learning melodies by ear, I'm gonna do it myself, the problems apears with rythm.
Why I don't use GP for this? I just think that, when I'm gonna learn some rythm on GP, I'm not gonna be able to play it by the motronome.
Anyway, take a look at this from this point: How did Slash learnt to play or Yngwie, Dimebag - there was no tabs or GP back in 70's or 80's, huh?
I of course realise these are not 80's, that's way I'm gonna probably use GP after failing at trying to learn at metronome only (or not)

Uff! that was a long one!


To be fair, you can use the metronome in guitar pro aswell. Or tap your foot, that is what i do aswell as use it. So that i can practice it with GP then play it at a metronome.

Anyways, if you want to know how they learned they probably counted or went by ear.
If you write the stuff down and then mark where the 1,2,3 and 4 beats will be it's much easier.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#14
Quote by Washu-chan
Actually tabulature goes back to at least the 15th century according to wiki. I remember seeing play books at the guitar shop in the late sixtys with tab but since I had been reading standard notation for years before I picked up a guitar thats what I'd always use. I like using the virtual fretboard in GP because seeing the standard notation when I fret a note has really helped reinforce the fretboard map.


Well, I can't tell I knew it
But still what I wanna proof (I guess?) is how important is playing by ear:
It's really important for songs-writing: when you create a melody in your mind (hear it), you just play it using the ability to play by ear.
Anyway, I have to say: best forum I've ever been: quick and effective help and good discussion
Thanks for help, still more suggestions are welcomed
#15
Quote by Sickz
To be fair, you can use the metronome in guitar pro aswell. Or tap your foot, that is what i do aswell as use it. So that i can practice it with GP then play it at a metronome.

Anyways, if you want to know how they learned they probably counted or went by ear.
If you write the stuff down and then mark where the 1,2,3 and 4 beats will be it's much easier.


Maybe they counted or went by ear, but if it's bout Yngwie... come on, I don't believe he didn't spend hours daily at the metronome
Anyway it is really inspiring and motivating to me to read such things bout the legendary guitarists - I can imagine young Slash spending hours practicing etc.
#16
Quote by zyx32
I have a problem with one thing when playing with a metronome:
I Don't know how to learn playing pauses. What I mea is in some songs you have to play a note BEETWEEN metronome thicks without playing a notes at the thicks.
For example: intro riff form "everytime I die" by Children Of Bodom or "****ing hostile" Pantera. Could somebody give me a first, simple rythm excercise, so I could learn it, and then, having a first step, just I'm gonne be able to create my own excercises (like I usually do).

start playing 8th notes, you dont even have to do it on a guitar - just tap your foot in a reasonable tempo, and for each tap with your foot, you tap the table twice with your hand or finger so you go like
foot : 1 i2 i3 i4 i1
hand:123456781
then, you do the same rhytm and just alternate between foot and hand, so you go like "1foot,2hand,3foot,4hand,5foot,6hand,7foot,8hand"
and there you have your off beat rhytm in your hand, hope it made sense
#17
Quote by zyx32
@Macabre_Turtle:
I think You understood it well, your answer gave me a lot, anyway, the point is, in these songs you have riffs like: eights and sixteens in one measure. It's thing I got to learn t play after playing stuff like all eights in a measure, etc.


Well then, glad I could help.
#18
Quote by zyx32
Maybe they counted or went by ear, but if it's bout Yngwie... come on, I don't believe he didn't spend hours daily at the metronome
Anyway it is really inspiring and motivating to me to read such things bout the legendary guitarists - I can imagine young Slash spending hours practicing etc.


I dident say he dident use a metronome. I simply implied that he got such good rhythm by probably counting to the metronome. Though with the case of yngwie, he learned to read rhytms in sheet music before he started to play guitar, i guess that helped him alot. Since he played the violin for a couple of years (not sure if violin, some classical instrument at least) before the started playing guitar.

Reading sheet music he must have learned how long a quarter notes lasts, eightnotes, sixteenth notes. Dotted quarter notes, dotted eight notes etc. He had a mental picture of how stuff should be, so therefor his timing/rhythm was great.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."