#1
Ive recently learned the circle of fifths, and now I want to know which keys I should modulate between, and can I modulate from a mode in one key to a differrent mode in another key? Like G Ionian to B dorian?
#3
You should base which key to modulate to by being familiar with what different modulations sound like and making an artistic decision.
#4
Quote by 123mac123
Ive recently learned the circle of fifths, and now I want to know which keys I should modulate between, and can I modulate from a mode in one key to a differrent mode in another key? Like G Ionian to B dorian?


If you're asking a basic question about modulation and just recently learned the circle of fifths, ignore everything you think you know about modes and just play in keys.
#5
about the only thing I know about modes (and Im playing piano not gutiar btw) Then Eg If im playing in C Major.
C Ionian Would be
C D E F G A B C
And D Dorian would be
D E F G A B C D
and so on

I percieve modes as ranged within a scale, I know that each scale has a differrent tone to semitone ratio, Ionian Lyian Mixolydian are Major and Aeolian Phyrgian and Dorian are Minor. Locrian being dimished, How shoud I be looking at modes?

If I play C Ionian over a C Maor Triad it sounds happy, and if I play A aeolian over an aminor triad it sounds sad, is this a good enough understanding? I think there is probably more I oculd be doing with modes and I want to know what that is, I know how to play any Major Scale including Flat keys on the Piano, all scales I learned start on the Root Major but I know how to foigure out the modes based on that, I just dont really know fully what to do with modes.

I do play guitar I just find it easier to recognise modes on piano then guitar, since the same modes can occur in way more locations over the neck of a guitar
Last edited by 123mac123 at Feb 13, 2012,
#6
Quote by 123mac123
How shoud I be looking at modes?


You shouldn't be.

You should be ignoring them.

If I play C Ionian over a C Maor Triad it sounds happy, and if I play A aeolian over an aminor triad it sounds sad, is this a good enough understanding?


No. Because in one case you are playing in C major and another you are playing in A minor.


I think there is probably more I oculd be doing with modes and I want to know what that is, I know how to play any Major Scale including Flat keys on the Piano, all scales I learned start on the Root Major but I know how to foigure out the modes based on that, I just dont really know fully what to do with modes.


I know. That's why you shouldn't use them. Here's my rule of thumb for modes:

You should never even *think* about what a mode might be until you have an experience along the lines of listening to a song, and saying - JUST BASED ON WHAT YOU HEAR - "Oh, that's interesting. It sounds minor except he keeps going to the sharp sixth."

Instead focus on major and minor. When you are playing in A minor and the underlying chord shifts to Dm, you are not suddenly playing in D Dorian. You're still playing in A minor. Heck, you're probably still playing in Am if the chord shifts to C major.

So going back to your original question, DO NOT think about modulating from G Ionian to B Dorian. Instead, think about modulating from G major to F# minor or maybe to B minor.

(G major to B minor is a VERY easy modulation. I'll let you figure out why.)

Ignore modes for now. Pretend you've never even heard of them. There are much more important things for you to be working on.
#7
Well G Major is G A B C D E F# G and B minor is B C# D E F# G A B, Your just adding one sharp, but is this how you should modulate? The two keys are very similar with only one note differrence, Is the modulation really going to have much of a differrent feel from the previous key with only one note being changed?

also G Major triad is G B D and B Minor triad is B D F#, I see a relationsip amongst the notes but dont fully know what I should take from that, except that Minor lives in Major I guess
Last edited by 123mac123 at Feb 13, 2012,
#8
Do you know about harmony? Do you know what a dominant chord is?
If the answer is no, you've got a long way before modulation
Quote by Xiaoxi
The Byzantine scale was useful until the Ottoman scale came around and totally annihilated it.
#9
I know about Harmony and consonant and disonant intervals, the dominant is The Major chord at the fifth degree.
#10
I'm going to recommend you get a good book on theory which builds your knowledge up from the absolute basics.

I recommend "Harmony and Theory" by Schroeder and Wyatt. I'm sure there are other equally good books - but the point is that you want a WORKBOOK which is a complete structured course in theory.

You know very little music theory. That's okay - nobody is born knowing this stuff - but it sounds like you want to know it. So stop just randomly grabbing ideas as they happen to land in front of you, and instead get serious about it and inject some discipline into what you're learning.