#2
You might want to but I think you just have to take it in your stride so you don't get a bad name and lose gigs because of it.
Don't really know what you can say though
#3
You could get better at what you do. That'll show 'em.

Edit: actually, I dunno, because I just checked out your band and you're really good, so your live show either sucks or the crowd just thought they're too cool to dance.
Last edited by TextOnTheScreen at Feb 13, 2012,
#5
Just try and get them involved. Tell em to stand up, pull them in toward the stage, try to get them moving. They'd have to be a really terrible crowd if they totally resist all attempts, in which case its just gonna be a bad show, and theres nothing you can do about it. I wouldn't recommend pissing them off though.
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#6
I've noticed at alot of the shows around here if there's not a whole lot of people everyone just stands there. I don't know what kind of crowd you was playing to but that could've been the problem there. Either that or they just don't know your music and don't feel like moshing around.
#7
To get people actually up and standing, dancing, you need a couple of things.

1. The audience is at or under the age of 12. Kids don't give a crap and will dance to anything.

2. If they are over that age you'll generally need:

- Late night
- Alcohol
- Chicks already up and dancing

Or massive financial backing/established fanbase that already know your songs and are going crazy. Or playing covers that people know.

Just because you played a gig, and nobody danced doesn't necesserily mean you did poorly though. If you pay attention to the audience, things like audience members going quiet and watching you play, applause after you finish a song, bobbing in their seats etc. These things can be indicative of a good gig. Also watch the bar staff, see if they're enjoying it. They've heard every other band in your area, so they'll have a feel for what's good and what's crap.

Oh also if you get that adrenaline rush and everything becomes super fun and organic, the audience is going to like it. That's a general rule, if you're having fun on stage, the audience is going to enjoy it. Like watching little kids laugh and play at the playground, the audience is watching a bunch of guys having fun with eachother. It rubs off on the audience.

And finally it's all part of paying your dues. As a musician you'll always come across non-receptive audiences (or no audience). You're being compared directly to your idols, so there's a pretty high standard of music expected from the public.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#9
^^ Awesome!

TS: You face a little more challenge since you play metal, and metal typically plays to audiences full of angry young males who feel disenfranchised by society. You yourself may be one of the angry disenfranchised.

Outside of the typical advice of "don't make stupid jokes" or "don't act gay", you need to find a way to connect with an audience that in general already feels like angry dark outcasts.

Meet some of the crowd before the show. Know a few names. And when you get up on stage, tell the crowd "I'm gonna shout out to some serious metal MF'ers, Bob and Joe. Because you guys rock so F'n hard, it makes it great to do what we do. This song is xxxxx".

But you get the idea. Connect with your audience. Make them feel like your gig is their gig.

Playing typical cover band bar music is so much easier when you play songs about getting drunk and getting laid. It's a natural sell.

One of the better personable frontmen I've seen is Corey Taylor. He knows how to connect with a crowd. I saw him when he fronted Stone Sour. He was head and shoulders above the rest of the bands in terms of crowd engagement.
#10
My friends' band played a gig at the local youth center a few weeks ago. The frontman was really good at interacting with the crowd, but not everybody got into it since they're a metal band and the crowd featured a lot of kids who wanted Guns n' Roses covers. I'd go with what seems to be the consensus on this issue, just have fun and it will rub off on people. There are gonna be crappy crowds who think they're too good to dance, but next time the crowd will likely be better. Keep your head up
#11
Tell them free beer!
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#12
My band played a few weeks ago at our youth center. We did not have a big crowd for us, but a good amount of our friends came forward to headbang. We had a great time. Our second gig is at the same place this saturday, and there will be 2 other metal bands there, and one of them is a bigger band, so there will definitely be a better crowd. Our headbanging friends will be there, plus people will know how to dance and mosh.

Talking to an audience, you need to interact with them. Don't be afraid to point someone out if you're gonna say something to them, like 'I like you guys right here, you're dancing great' and introduce every one of your songs except maybe your starting song. If you give a short description of a song, that's good too.

Example: My gig, our vocalist: "Alright this next one is the first song we wrote as a band. I particularly enjoy it because it's about someone I really don't like. It's called Owlbear." (riff)

Look like you're having a good time too. If there's a part you know you can pull off perfectly, go crazy while doing it. The crowd may get more into it if they see that you're into it.

ALSO: If a particularly dance worthy section comes up in a song, perhaps right before it yell JUMP! or GET UP! but DO NOT say it excessively. Hearing the vocalist yell 'I want you to jump!' over and over can really kill a mood.
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Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
Last edited by thePTOD at Feb 14, 2012,
#13
Quote by thePTOD
My band played a few weeks ago at our youth center. We did not have a big crowd for us, but a good amount of our friends came forward to headbang. We had a great time. Our second gig is at the same place this saturday, and there will be 2 other metal bands there, and one of them is a bigger band, so there will definitely be a better crowd. Our headbanging friends will be there, plus people will know how to dance and mosh.

Talking to an audience, you need to interact with them. Don't be afraid to point someone out if you're gonna say something to them, like 'I like you guys right here, you're dancing great' and introduce every one of your songs except maybe your starting song. If you give a short description of a song, that's good too.

Example: My gig, our vocalist: "Alright this next one is the first song we wrote as a band. I particularly enjoy it because it's about someone I really don't like. It's called Owlbear." (riff)

Look like you're having a good time too. If there's a part you know you can pull off perfectly, go crazy while doing it. The crowd may get more into it if they see that you're into it.

ALSO: If a particularly dance worthy section comes up in a song, perhaps right before it yell JUMP! or GET UP! but DO NOT say it excessively. Hearing the vocalist yell 'I want you to jump!' over and over can really kill a mood.


i swear, that last line is my singer. every 5 seconds he yells "OPEN THIS PLACE UP", now, everyone has tried to tell him to stop. but he doesnt listen
#14
I think pissing your audience off is generally a bad choice. If they're not into it the way you'd like, assume it's your fault.

I have never, ever been part of a crowd that was berated by a singer and felt motivated to be a more supporting audience member by their behavior. It's literally NEVER happened. Generally, you only provoke antagonism, sarcastic remarks, and more disinterest.

Are you making good eye contact with members of the crowd? That can make a huge difference. Engage them in a positive way (that may be harder for metal bands to do, but I'm not a metaler). eg, seen bands encourage people to step up closer to the stage (in L.A., there's often a bubble around the stage, people don't ant to get too close). One singer I saw asked two of her (cute) friends to get right up close to the stage, and then when the bubble formed she said, with a smile, "I can't believe you guys are going to let those cute girls stand up here all by themselves."

But overall, be positive. Create a vibe that your audience wants to share. Sometimes that means you have to dial it back a little to pul lthem it - if you're at 11, and they're at 3, you're not going to get them up by going to 12 ... but by picking a more intimate song, by diving down to 7, you connect with them and then you can lift them back up to 11 once they're already hooked.
#15
Quote by moses132049
i swear, that last line is my singer. every 5 seconds he yells "OPEN THIS PLACE UP", now, everyone has tried to tell him to stop. but he doesnt listen

Our vocalist was in an old band as the bassist, and his screamer did that. It's annoying as crap. "LET'S GO UP AND DOWN UP AND DOWN UP AND DOWN" Legit quote, I make a joke that if he thought of it he would have yelled "COME ON JUMP LIFT WITH YOUR LEGS NOT YOUR BACK WE DON'T WANT ANY SPINAL INJURIES UP AND DOWN TIME IT WITH THE BEAT ALRIGHT YEAH COME ON JUMP"
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#16
Don't expect random people to dance or get into your music besides bobbing they're head in the back. You need to be bringing your personal friends to local gigs and tell them before hand to get into it and be right up front.

You play metal and not metallica metal , it's not exactly the easiest form of music to get a bunch of bar goes into.
#17
Quote by scguitarking927
You play metal and not metallica metal , it's not exactly the easiest form of music to get a bunch of bar goes into.



This comment actually piqued my interest. So this is TS's band http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXdh0rXFowM

Firstly, get a bass player. You want people to go crazy and you only have half a rhythm section? You're simply producing a very tinny sound. The bass is required, especially for heavier genres of music.

Secondly, be aware of where you are playing. Metal is basically as opposite to mainstream as you can be, so avoiding non-metal venues is probably your best bet. I have seen many a metal band clean out a venue quite literally. There's 50 people when they start, and 5 left when they finish.

Thirdly, from that video it's sorta hard to tell if you guys are "tight" or not. I do get the impression that the whole band isn't functioning as a unit per se, more that 3 guys happen to be playing the same song at "roughly" the same time.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#18
Quote by moses132049
what are some things a band can say to a bad crowd? we played to a bunch of zombies the other night and i had nothing clever to say, i wanted to piss them off.

Did you want to get them involved in your music, or did you want them to become hostile towards you?

There is no such thing as a bad audience. There is however a lot of situations where the entertainment provided is not appropriate for the audience present.
#19
Quote by AlanHB


Firstly, get a bass player. You want people to go crazy and you only have half a rhythm section?


this ^
#20
Quote by Quintex
Did you want to get them involved in your music, or did you want them to become hostile towards you?

There is no such thing as a bad audience. There is however a lot of situations where the entertainment provided is not appropriate for the audience present.

when i said i wanted to piss them off, i didnt mean i wanted to say something to piss them off, i mean i wanted to provoke them to get into the music. such as "bring it in" or something.
#21
Quote by AlanHB
This comment actually piqued my interest. So this is TS's band http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXdh0rXFowM

Firstly, get a bass player. You want people to go crazy and you only have half a rhythm section? You're simply producing a very tinny sound. The bass is required, especially for heavier genres of music.

Secondly, be aware of where you are playing. Metal is basically as opposite to mainstream as you can be, so avoiding non-metal venues is probably your best bet. I have seen many a metal band clean out a venue quite literally. There's 50 people when they start, and 5 left when they finish.

Thirdly, from that video it's sorta hard to tell if you guys are "tight" or not. I do get the impression that the whole band isn't functioning as a unit per se, more that 3 guys happen to be playing the same song at "roughly" the same time.

we've been looking for a bassist for quite some time. ive almost given up on finding one. and if you watched the video of our song "My Salvation" i honestly think that was one of our worst performances in quite a while.
#22
Quote by AlanHB
This comment actually piqued my interest. So this is TS's band http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXdh0rXFowM

Firstly, get a bass player. You want people to go crazy and you only have half a rhythm section? You're simply producing a very tinny sound. The bass is required, especially for heavier genres of music.

Secondly, be aware of where you are playing. Metal is basically as opposite to mainstream as you can be, so avoiding non-metal venues is probably your best bet. I have seen many a metal band clean out a venue quite literally. There's 50 people when they start, and 5 left when they finish.

Thirdly, from that video it's sorta hard to tell if you guys are "tight" or not. I do get the impression that the whole band isn't functioning as a unit per se, more that 3 guys happen to be playing the same song at "roughly" the same time.


Man, I had just listened to the facebook recording.

Man you need a rhythm guitar and bassist BAD!!!

If I was a metal head and heard that, no offense, but that's not heavy. It's high painfully gainy noise. It needs the rhythm players!!!
#23
Quote by scguitarking927
Man, I had just listened to the facebook recording.

Man you need a rhythm guitar and bassist BAD!!!

If I was a metal head and heard that, no offense, but that's not heavy. It's high painfully gainy noise. It needs the rhythm players!!!

im not just saying this because its my band, but seriously, we're probably the furthest thing from "high painfully gainy noise" if you think we're noise, you should listen this band from the area: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5b47xq4urVU
#24
Quote by moses132049
im not just saying this because its my band, but seriously, we're probably the furthest thing from "high painfully gainy noise" if you think we're noise, you should listen this band from the area: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5b47xq4urVU


If he thinks you're noise, you're noise. You might think you're heavy as holy hell, but it appears that a lot of people think differently. Personally I felt that it was thin, high gain noise, and while that other band was quite horrific, at least the music had body to it. With a Rhythm Guitarist and Bassist, you guys will sound ten times better, and get a good reaction. You can't move to something that's vaguely tinny sounding with a few cymbal crashes, sorry to say, it needs to be fuller.
#25
Quote by moses132049
im not just saying this because its my band, but seriously, we're probably the furthest thing from "high painfully gainy noise" if you think we're noise, you should listen this band from the area: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5b47xq4urVU


Live, yes you do.

And as said above, that band you just posted sounds 1000x more full than both your live and recorded material.
#26
Quote by moses132049
we've been looking for a bassist for quite some time. ive almost given up on finding one. and if you watched the video of our song "My Salvation" i honestly think that was one of our worst performances in quite a while.


If all the other bands can find one, I'm sure you can too.

If not, become an acoustic folk trio.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#28
No offense, but eqing and mastering can't make up for a lack of a bass player, especially in this style where the music is percussive, and the entire point of it is to be heavy. If you recorded a bass part yourself, I'd bet that you'd sound ten times better instantly without any mastering.
#29
Quote by Xter
Tell them free beer!


I was gonna name my band "free beer"

Put out flyers all over town saying "Tonight at Shenanigans from 10-12... FREE BEEER!!!!"

Then we laugh and rock out while the crowd riots.
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He's obviously pretty young, and I'd guess he's being raised by wolves, or at least humans with the intellectual capacity and compassion of wolves.


You finally made it home, draped in the flag that you fell for.
And so it goes
#30
Quote by CelestialGuitar
No offense, but eqing and mastering can't make up for a lack of a bass player, especially in this style where the music is percussive, and the entire point of it is to be heavy. If you recorded a bass part yourself, I'd bet that you'd sound ten times better instantly without any mastering.


QFT!!!
#31
Quote by CelestialGuitar
No offense, but eqing and mastering can't make up for a lack of a bass player, especially in this style where the music is percussive, and the entire point of it is to be heavy. If you recorded a bass part yourself, I'd bet that you'd sound ten times better instantly without any mastering.


That is the correct answer. Except for the "No offense" statement at the start, as this means nothing and is typically reserved for teenage girls who follow it up with an insult.

Eg. "No offense but you really suck"

The theory is that apologies can be saved up like credits, so using this theory you can apologise ahead of time.

However it is not required to use the "no offense" if you:

1. Want to take responsibility for your statement.

2. Are not a teenage girl.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#32
Quote by AlanHB
That is the correct answer. Except for the "No offense" statement at the start, as this means nothing and is typically reserved for teenage girls who follow it up with an insult.

Eg. "No offense but you really suck"

The theory is that apologies can be saved up like credits, so using this theory you can apologise ahead of time.

However it is not required to use the "no offense" if you:

1. Want to take responsibility for your statement.

2. Are not a teenage girl.


Was that necessary? I'll talk the way I bloody well want to, thanks, we're here to help out the topic maker, not bitch about our choice of words.
#33
Quote by CelestialGuitar
Was that necessary? I'll talk the way I bloody well want to, thanks, we're here to help out the topic maker, not bitch about our choice of words.


Hmm, perhaps I should have put no offense at the start of my post. It was a joke dude, contemplating the common usage of these words. Take it as you must. You made a very good point otherwise.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#34
Let me be honest...talk as little as possible.

Nobody likes a generally unknown band talking their ears off between songs. They came to see a show, give them a show. If the crowd isn't responding maybe it's the wrong venue, your music isn't good enough, your music isn't conducive to an energetic crowd response, your stage energy isn't very good, the crowd sucks...etc.

If you put on a kick ass show the crowd will respond...I wouldn't bank on saying anything to them aside from a 5 second introduction after the first song, or telling them where they can get merch in the middle or end of the set. My 2 cents...
#35
Quote by HotspurJr
I think pissing your audience off is generally a bad choice. If they're not into it the way you'd like, assume it's your fault.

I have never, ever been part of a crowd that was berated by a singer and felt motivated to be a more supporting audience member by their behavior. It's literally NEVER happened. Generally, you only provoke antagonism, sarcastic remarks, and more disinterest.


This. I went to see a band once a year or so ago, and they put on an excellent show. After the show, a lot of the crowd milled about the stage/floor area, chatting. I was sitting there debating whether or not I enjoyed the music enough to buy a CD before I left, and the lead singer wandered over to the merch table and called out, "Anyone going to buy anything? I feel like I'm at a house party or something."

Not entirely sure why, but that rubbed me the wrong way enough that I left without a CD and haven't listened to them since. Maybe it's because it was 2am and I was cranky, I dunno. But it's definitely an example of what not to do, IMHO.

first of all, i recorded our EP myself, and i barely had a clue how to properly record anything.


...and this is a product you expect people to pay money for? Your recordings are your resume, and you don't write your resume on used toilet paper and tell people "that's all I had to work with - just hold it by the corners and ignore the smell."
Last edited by CarsonStevens at Feb 24, 2012,