#1
This may seem like a silly question, but here goes. tax return season is upon us, and I've been set to get quite a nice chunk of cash. Now, I absolutely love semi-hollow guitars (a la Gretsch), but I've also been recently recruited as the guitarist for a metal band. Do semi-hollows allow for a good metal sound? I've never seen one used for such purposes before. Would I need to invest in a certain model, certain pickups? We wouldn't be playing in anything lower than D Standard, so I wouldn't imagine I'd have to mess with the guitar itself too much.
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#2
well, the problem with semi-hollows and metal has to do primarily with well, the semi-hollowness, semi-hollows have a nasty tendency to feed back under mid-level gain much less the high gain used for heavy metal..... so its not that you can't do it, you will just have feedback issues
#6
You're going to be dealing with A LOT of feedback issues. A semi-hollow *might* be ok, but there will always be feedback issues.

I'm playing in a blues/rock band, using a Gretsch 5120, and I get feedback all the time whenever I turn on my fuzz or blues driver. It's getting pretty annoying. It might be my amp (Vox AD50VT), or the mediocre pickups, but I don't think I could play a loud show with what I have now.

Josh Homme uses semi-hollow guitars so I'm thinking it might work for you.

Best bet would be trying one out in a store with your pedals/amp. See how loud you can get without terrible feedback.
#9
I'm kind of a pickup n00b, but are there any brands that would help provide a thicker tone? Or would the stock on the guitar do that best? I've heard semi hollows tend to have a thicker sound on their own.
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#10
I got a cheap little semi hollow with no upgrades or anything and i can get a pretty good Tool sound from it, though i don't know what kind of metal you're talking about. but hey if they're comfortable to you, and you get one with suitable pickups and don't mind a little feedback i don't see why not.
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#11
i run warpigs in my prs hb.

you can do whatever you want.

once you're used to it the feedback isn't a problem at all.
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#12
i think it would be best to buy a PRS hollow like Emil from Daath. other than that you will probably have alot of feedback issues. You could always put high output humbuckers in a hollowbody but that kind of defeats the purpose of having a hollowbody.

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#13
Quote by theponz
I got a cheap little semi hollow with no upgrades or anything and i can get a pretty good Tool sound from it, though i don't know what kind of metal you're talking about. but hey if they're comfortable to you, and you get one with suitable pickups and don't mind a little feedback i don't see why not.


Tool is actually pretty close to the tone I like.

Quote by iceh88
i think it would be best to buy a PRS hollow like Emil from Daath. other than that you will probably have alot of feedback issues. You could always put high output humbuckers in a hollowbody but that kind of defeats the purpose of having a hollowbody.


Well, as shallow as it sounds, it's really the look and feel of the guitar that I love. So...it's kind of more of an aesthetic thing to me haha
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#14
If you can manage to play without standing next to a blasting speaker you’ll be fine. If you’re one of those guys who must always be within 48" of a full-stack with a 100 watt head it’s probably a bad idea.
#15
If i remember right Pepper Keenan has a dot or an ES33 whatever it is, and you can stuff tshirts or rags in them to help with feedback