#2
That is mainly for feedback reduction when playing through an amp and such but it should have the same effect for sound coming out, not sure if it will affect your tone though. You could try making a homemade version of that if you have the ambition lol. You can also place your mic closer to your mouth if you haven't already tried that.
GEAR:
Epiphone Les Paul Studio Deluxe
ESP LTD EX-360
Peavey VYPYR 30W

"There's nothing constant in the universe.
All ebb and flow, and every shape that's born,
bears in it's womb, the seeds of change".
#3
I'm not using a mic, but i might try one just for the hell of it

and can my guitar having a cutaway affect the sound or something because i know my dads gibson acoustic isn't this loug
#4
Typically the larger the body, the bigger the sound it has. It depends on the wood of the guitar and what strings you are using as well. Are you just recording through a camera?
GEAR:
Epiphone Les Paul Studio Deluxe
ESP LTD EX-360
Peavey VYPYR 30W

"There's nothing constant in the universe.
All ebb and flow, and every shape that's born,
bears in it's womb, the seeds of change".
#6
I always suggest buying an acoustic electric for this very reason.

I know that doesn't make much sense, (WUT, it's already too loud (?)), but some of the lower priced acoustic amps have reverb and 2 channel inputs.

First, some reverb can never hurt, even the best singers, or the guitar's sound, for that matter.

And with separate inputs for vocal mic and guitar, you have a creditable mini mixing console at your disposal.

This is a decent small 2 channel amp; http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guitars/peavey-ecoustic-e208-30w-2x8-acoustic-combo-amp

I understand money can be an issue, I just offer it as something to think about going forward.

Sound hole plugs will have an adverse effect on the sound, particularly on the bottom end, since it's the bass that causes most of the feedback, so you get rid of it at the guitar, then put it back in with the PA. Nuf said.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 14, 2012,
#7
Yeah what cranky said would be the best way, but if you don't feel like upgrading or buying an interface you can get around it. Just record your guitar with the camera first and you singing quietly or mouthing the words if you have your face in the shot, and then do a second take with just the vocals. This way you can superimpose the vocals over top of the guitar track and at which ever level you please so you can hear your vocals over the guitar without having to yell or sacrifice how the song should be played. You can do this in any cheap free program even windows movie maker.
GEAR:
Epiphone Les Paul Studio Deluxe
ESP LTD EX-360
Peavey VYPYR 30W

"There's nothing constant in the universe.
All ebb and flow, and every shape that's born,
bears in it's womb, the seeds of change".
#8
Well one of the other reasons i asked is because in my speech class im going to be playing guitar and singing and i'm not gonna have a mic or anything
#9
Well, we both know what the answer to that, play softer and sing louder.

And granted, it's a lot easier said than done.

There's this too, soundhole plugs cut off mostly bass. The bass doesn't necessarily mask information in the vocal range.

Since you'll be playing rhythm while singing, practice favoring the bass, and staying off the top strings while strumming. That might help some.
#10
Quote by Maillouxlp18
Yeah what cranky said would be the best way, but if you don't feel like upgrading or buying an interface you can get around it. Just record your guitar with the camera first and you singing quietly or mouthing the words if you have your face in the shot, and then do a second take with just the vocals. This way you can superimpose the vocals over top of the guitar track and at which ever level you please so you can hear your vocals over the guitar without having to yell or sacrifice how the song should be played. You can do this in any cheap free program even windows movie maker.


Thanks I never thought about doing that
#11
Quote by BornToLooze
Well one of the other reasons i asked is because in my speech class im going to be playing guitar and singing and i'm not gonna have a mic or anything
And over dubbing is going to work in a live setting how...?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 14, 2012,
#12
Quote by Captaincranky
And over dubbing is going to work in a live setting how...?

It won't, I just meant for putting videos on youtube


EDIT: However it does work for pop singers
#13
Quote by BornToLooze
EDIT: However it does work for pop singers

It does indeed. And has for decades, I might add.
#15
Quote by BornToLooze
Well that solves it...I'll just chop my balls off and sing a Justin Bieber song
Well, that approach has been around, and has worked for centuries. Although I think it would be more of a Michael Jackson approach, than a Justin Beiber methodology.....

Here's Wiki's take on the topic: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castrato