#1
Alright so I can hit the high note in the chorus to this song (the 'make' bit) pretty easily

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Z6hOf7QlIA#t=1m2s

but when I tried singing the chorus to Iris by the GGDs I had a lot of trouble with it. My voice cracks, bad tone when I do reach it etc.

vid for reference: www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdYWuo9OFAw&ob=av3e#t=50s

The highest note in the Iris chorus is an A4 which is a lot lower than the note in the first song. I've been trying to figure out why it's so much harder for me.
Are some passages just harder to sing?

What's weirder is I can sing Iris half a step down and it's a breeze. That makes me think it's a mental thing. I can easily hit an A4 if I'm doing scales.
#2
the interval betwen the high note and the notes leading to it are probably lower and don't "walk" up like singing a scale weird intervals are harder to sing just practice it and make sure you've warmed up first
#3
Are you using the same part of your vocal range each time? The AB note is a no brainer falsetto but Iris could be tempting to push your chest voice.
Quote by metaldood91
Hi. Can someone tell me which guitars are real 24 fret guitars and which are just 22 fret guitars with 2 extra frets added on?


http://www.youtube.com/user/Joeseffel


Quote by smcstoronto1234

So very true...
#5
Could be either depending on individual ranges, but the point is you may be pushing chest voice for Iris and switching ranges for Brand New Start.
Quote by metaldood91
Hi. Can someone tell me which guitars are real 24 fret guitars and which are just 22 fret guitars with 2 extra frets added on?


http://www.youtube.com/user/Joeseffel


Quote by smcstoronto1234

So very true...
#6
Oh yeah I see what you're saying. That could be the case, when I sing it half a step down I'm pretty sure I'm using head voice though. I just don't understand why the half step jump is so difficult for me
#7
Quote by Citizen Swag
Falsetto? Are you sure? I thought it sounded like a lot of head voice.


Head is basically the female falsetto, so it doesn't really matter. Could it be that the first is just after a breath, while the second is after one or another word? More air has helped me alot, and opening you the volume knob inside your throat is helpful, too.
#9
Myles is definitely in head voice. And, I have the same problem. The thing is, it's easier to start in head voice and sing down into chest voice. It's more difficult to switch from chest to head in small intervals. So, if you're singing up chromatically, it's hard to tell when you should switch to head voice. But, singing down, it naturally happens. When there's a big leap like there is in Brand New Start, you know that that's in head voice, so you switch into it and sing down...

I suggest you get a piano, play a higher note (preferably the highest you can hit in HEAD voice) and sing down with the piano to find the break in your voice. Keep doing this until you know right where your break is. Then, think while you're singing, "Ok, this is my chest voice limit" and switch to head. Eventually, your muscle memory will kick in and you won't have to think about it.

I hope that makes sense. And, if so, I hope it helps.
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#10
Quote by CGB89
Myles is definitely in head voice. And, I have the same problem. The thing is, it's easier to start in head voice and sing down into chest voice. It's more difficult to switch from chest to head in small intervals. So, if you're singing up chromatically, it's hard to tell when you should switch to head voice. But, singing down, it naturally happens. When there's a big leap like there is in Brand New Start, you know that that's in head voice, so you switch into it and sing down...

I suggest you get a piano, play a higher note (preferably the highest you can hit in HEAD voice) and sing down with the piano to find the break in your voice. Keep doing this until you know right where your break is. Then, think while you're singing, "Ok, this is my chest voice limit" and switch to head. Eventually, your muscle memory will kick in and you won't have to think about it.

I hope that makes sense. And, if so, I hope it helps.


Awesome, yeah that makes a lot of sense. I never thought to figure out where my chest voice breaks into head voice. I'll give this a shot next time I sing. Thanks.
#11
The note in Brand New Start is not falsetto, but just the mix-register (what i believe people refer to when saying: headvoice"
Sometimes the words/pronounciation can be a huge factor as well.
Compare the word: Yeah with Whole for instance as two examples, it would be way easier to hit a high note on yeah.
#12
Quote by Citizen Swag
Awesome, yeah that makes a lot of sense. I never thought to figure out where my chest voice breaks into head voice. I'll give this a shot next time I sing. Thanks.


It doesn't really go that way, I believe, for two reasons.

1. Some keys, fills, feels, songs, etc. are easier to go high with.
2. Chest and Head have a certain range where you can use both (sometimes comfortably, sometimes not).