#1
So I have buzzing on my E and A strings, action is about right at 4/64th, and I have checked frets with the credit card method >.>; (worked fine before :P) Anyway I noticed there wasn't much releif so I loosened the truss rod a bit and let it sit ect, well it is a dual action rod so now it is at where it has gone loose then tight again... yet there is more relief but not as much as I would think it would be (never had one fully loose before) cannot fit a .71 pick under 6-7th fret holding down at 1 and 17th? So what should I do? Other then this idk what else the buzz could be its kinda of like a rattleing delayed buzz sounds kinda like change jingleing, this is my 3rd schecter replacement and this one is a C-1 hellraiser fr which I do not think should have any bad issues.... And yes I just changed the strings....
#2
You can turn truss rods the other way to get more relief.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#3
oh? um which direction, strangely left seemed to tighten it after I turn it so far, so your saying if I keep going right it should give more relief?
#4
Right = Less Action = Tighter
Left = More Action = Looser
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#5
Well on my Epiphone, turning the truss rod right gave more relief, so i guess

Just don't do anything hasty.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#7
Thank you for that if I am faceing the guitar is the clockwise/counter-clockwise switched or is that the right way O.o?
#8
rotating clockwise tightens.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#9
How much relief is there? 0.71 mm? That is WAY too much relief. Most manufacturers recommend 0.2-0.25 mm at most on most necks. The flatter the radius, the less relief you should need. If you are still getting buzz it's due to uneven frets, low bridge or low nut.
Last edited by al112987 at Feb 14, 2012,
#10
It is a locking nut and the action is already at 4/64th.... and the buzz at the top of the neck....
#11
Is your trem set up properly? Are you giving yourself a few hours in between quarter turns to let the neck stabilize or are you just wrenching it until something happens?

"Fully loosened" tells me that you're messing with things you shouldn't be. Something is seriously wrong if your truss rod is completely slack.
#12
Careful you may cause expensive damage,. never more than a qtr turn at a time,. and you should leave the guitar 30 minutes for the wood to adjust to the change.
Some even say 24 hours,.

Fully losend does not sound good at all. I would sugest you bring the guitar to your nearest shop to see a tech guy.
#13
It is slack after I turned it the first time then if you turn it a bit more it tightens up again and turns the neck in the other direction, I think that is what happens with dual action rods, also after adjusting the rod I noticed my action is a bit off, is it ok to set it back up?
#14
How much relief is in your neck? (and I mean, a measurement, not a general... "I think it's a lot but I don't know").

And yes, your action will be higher if you add more relief. You typically compensate by lowering the bridge saddles.
Last edited by al112987 at Feb 14, 2012,
#16
Use feeler gauges. You should be able to pick them up at any auto store for a few bucks. You really should not be adding anymore relief than 0.25 mm at the 7th or 8th fret (or wherever the relief is at maximimum).

You really need to measure this before you go diddling about the truss rod. Don't be afraid to adjust the truss rod, but don't adjust it without knowing what you are doing either. Too much relief can cause permanent warping of the neck. If it is fully loosened, then you basically have about 150 lbs of force pulling down on the neck without any opposition.
#17
I'm not sure if this will help with a double-action truss rod but I read this piece of advice somewhere long ago and it seems to help. I do it just for loosening (more relief). With strings at full tension, go counter-clockwise a bit. Then support the guitar at the nut and the butt, then press firmly in on the middle of the neck with your other hand. Even with the strings at full tension, its surprising how much the neck will bend, helping it along in the desired direction. Then I re-measure the relief and if satisfied, give the nut a clockwise nudge jus to be sure the rod isn't "loose".
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