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#1
So the title pretty much says it all, who do you think is the most underrated guitarist in classic rock?

I for one think that the most underrated guitarist in classic rock is John Cann or "Du Cann" if you like...

His work with both Andromeda and Atomic Rooster is just as good as Page's work with Zeppelin, Blackmore's work with Purple and Iommi's work with Sabbath etc etc.
First of all the Andromeda record contains great pieces of proto-prog/psych songs which today remain uncompareable to any other songs in this genre. And has work with Atomic Rooster is just as good (if not better). He could play with the same virtuosity as Hendrix or Robert Fripp and still emerge into heavy pieces with a rocking attitude like Iommi and Page.

What do you think?
1971 - was the f***ing year
Bobby Liebling is the man!
#4
Tom Scholz from Boston. He had great melodic sensibility, but more importantly, he had fantastic tone, and made a lot of advances in recording techniques. He pioneered modern POD and amp-sim technology.
#6
Quote by FrauVfromPoB
Tom Scholz from Boston. He had great melodic sensibility, but more importantly, he had fantastic tone, and made a lot of advances in recording techniques. He pioneered modern POD and amp-sim technology.



+1
#10
a few that come to mind.

Frank Marino - from Mahogany Rush. hendrix influenced but had his own sound for sure. this guy could really burn and was doing some of the fast stuff that EVH seems to get credit for. check out MR Live for some awesome playing.

Pat Travers- did way more than the cover of Boom Boom (out go the lights) that can sometimes be heard on classic rock radio. his live album is also recomended.

Uli Roth- awesome guitar player that was in the Scorpions in the 70s. this was when they were truly original and kicked much ass. In Trance, Virgin Killer and Taken By Force as well as the live Tokyo Tapes are all essential listening.
#11
I think Mark Farner (Grand Funk Railroad) is pretty underrated. He isn't the flashiest guy out there but has very cool chops and I love his tone, especially in the first 2 GFR albums.
#12
Quote by FrauVfromPoB
Tom Scholz from Boston. He had great melodic sensibility, but more importantly, he had fantastic tone, and made a lot of advances in recording techniques. He pioneered modern POD and amp-sim technology.


Boston's first album with more or less recorded entirely in his basement and the thing sounds downright amazing even today
#13
Billy Duffy.

It is not possible to rate him high enough.

/Thread.

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#14
I always felt like Malcolm Young was very underrated because of being in a band with Angus.
#15
Quote by rocket monkey
I always felt like Malcolm Young was very underrated because of being in a band with Angus.


you don't think it could possibly be because he's not a very good guitar player?
Free your mind and your ass will follow
The kingdom of heaven is within
Open up your funky mind and you can fly

Sumdeus
#16
Quote by romencer17
you don't think it could possibly be because he's not a very good guitar player?

No - I agree with the other guy, Malcolm is probably a bigger part of AC/DC's overall sound than Angus is. Without Malcolm, Angus is nothing.

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#17
sure I agree with that too, but does that really make him "underrated"? maybe as far as the Young brothers go, but for guitarists in general i think there's good reason no one cares about Malcolm
Free your mind and your ass will follow
The kingdom of heaven is within
Open up your funky mind and you can fly

Sumdeus
#18
Quote by romencer17
sure I agree with that too, but does that really make him "underrated"? maybe as far as the Young brothers go, but for guitarists in general i think there's good reason no one cares about Malcolm

1,000,000s of people would seriously disagree with you about nobody caring about Malcolm. It takes an excellent player to keep a solid rhythm going for over 40 years. You're entitled to an opinion and can choose not to enjoy his work, but to try and claim he's not a good guitarist only makes me question your credibility.

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#19
AC/DC were the first band I became obsessed with back when I was 10 years old, don't assume I don't like them. Regardless of how I feel about their music, Malcolm is a very basic guitar player. It doesn't take an 'excellent player' to play what he plays, it's just different variations of the same chord progressions, a-c-d-e, repeat, repeat, etc. etc. I think there's a reason most people start with AC/DC with they're learning to play guitar and there's also a reason I got tired of playing AC/DC songs by the time i was 12.

tl;dr I'm not saying Malcolm is a bad guitarist by any means but he is certainly nothing special or out of the ordinary, hence I don't see why he is underrated. I think he gets all the praise which he deserves, he just doesn't have much to offer to begin with
Free your mind and your ass will follow
The kingdom of heaven is within
Open up your funky mind and you can fly

Sumdeus
#20
Quote by romencer17
AC/DC were the first band I became obsessed with back when I was 10 years old, don't assume I don't like them. Regardless of how I feel about their music, Malcolm is a very basic guitar player. It doesn't take an 'excellent player' to play what he plays, it's just different variations of the same chord progressions, a-c-d-e, repeat, repeat, etc. etc. I think there's a reason most people start with AC/DC with they're learning to play guitar and there's also a reason I got tired of playing AC/DC songs by the time i was 12.

tl;dr I'm not saying Malcolm is a bad guitarist by any means but he is certainly nothing special or out of the ordinary, hence I don't see why he is underrated. I think he gets all the praise which he deserves, he just doesn't have much to offer to begin with

Not a bad reply, I've corrected it for you.

You're right, he does get a certain amount of praise which is well deserved. He may not be rated as one of the worlds greatest guitarists, but that isn't his role in the band. His role, as is the case for ALL rhythm guitarists, is to provide a solid backing to the lead guitarist. He does that excellently - and on that basis you could probably make a justifiable case for him to be rated as one of the best rhythm guitarists in the world.

You don't have to be out of the ordinary to be underrated, you've just proved that by underrating him in this thread

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#21
i guess we have to agree to disagree. I don't believe I underrate him because I do like him, but I also firmly believe that he's never done anything special and even if we look at strictly rhythm guitarists there's a lot more interesting players out there
Free your mind and your ass will follow
The kingdom of heaven is within
Open up your funky mind and you can fly

Sumdeus
#22
Quote by bulby
I think Mark Farner (Grand Funk Railroad) is pretty underrated. He isn't the flashiest guy out there but has very cool chops and I love his tone, especially in the first 2 GFR albums.


totally agree with this. Mark was a really good player as were the other guys in GFR.

as for Malcom Young he is underated for sure. he has plenty to offer in that he shows you don't need flashy playing or fancy chords to make great music. this is very important to beginning players. how many guys wanted to play but figured that they'd never be as good as (fill in guitar hero here) so why bother. i'd say that Malcom is an unsung hero for many aspiring guitar players.
#23
Kako Vashalomidze. None of you guys will know him but, he was a guitarists from Georgia, which in his time was in Soviet Union. Reason I think that he is talented is because during 1960's 70's and 80's, rock and metal music were considered bad, even though it was one of the most popular genres of music. If you wanted to play guitar or rock music in public, you had to dress up in a suit and kinda look like what The Beatles looked like.
This is his song from 1969, and it sound very neo-classical. Keep in mind that there was not much neo-classical guitarists during that time.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V19uNdrpAtA&feature=related
And this is the song from his newer album, just ignore the talking part and listen to the guitar
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OP7YnWX2x3s&feature=related
#24
Quote by FrauVfromPoB
Tom Scholz from Boston. He had great melodic sensibility, but more importantly, he had fantastic tone, and made a lot of advances in recording techniques. He pioneered modern POD and amp-sim technology.


That's a really good one. Tom Scholz surprisingly gets no love.

I believe Alex Lifeson is underrated, especially being over shadowed by Geddy Lee and Neil Peart. Though lately he's been getting a lot more recognition which he deserves. Even Rolling Stone named him one of the 100 Greatest Guitarists! Wow!
#25
Brian May gets little recognition, I feel. He's come up with some of the most recognizable riffs and licks and the like.

Also, as an enormous David Gilmour fan, I wish more people knew about him. He has a rather large fan base as-is, but I'd like it to be bigger
Quote by Trowzaa
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Last edited by eGraham at Apr 3, 2012,
#26
Quote by eGraham
Brian May gets little recognition, I feel. He's come up with some of the most recognizable riffs and licks and the like.

Also, as an enormous David Gilmour fan, I wish more people knew about him. He has a rather large fan base as-is, but I'd like it to be bigger


I think David Gilmour fairly gets his due from his playing with Pink Floyd. However, I don't think what people know is he's actually pretty versatile! He played on Christian McBride's album Sci-Fi. He really surprised me with his technical abilities on that one.

Also, I forgot to mention Steve Howe of Yes. That guy is very easily one of the most underrated classic rock guitarist.
#27
Quote by roushsn95
I think David Gilmour fairly gets his due from his playing with Pink Floyd. However, I don't think what people know is he's actually pretty versatile! He played on Christian McBride's album Sci-Fi. He really surprised me with his technical abilities on that one.

Also, I forgot to mention Steve Howe of Yes. That guy is very easily one of the most underrated classic rock guitarist.

Really? I'll have to give that a listen. And yea, for Pink Floyd he does, but most people don't know his solo work. That's how I feel, anyway
Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

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#28
Quote by roushsn95
Also, I forgot to mention Steve Howe of Yes. That guy is very easily one of the most underrated classic rock guitarist.


This! Those who know him generally rank him as one of the best, but the problem is many people don't know about him...
#29
Allen Collins, Gary Rossington, and especially Ed King seem to get little to no credit (disregarding Allen Collins' solo on Freebird.) But I would have to say Steve Gaines in his all-too-short stint with Lynyrd Skynyrd. If you don't already know it, check out their cover of Merle Haggard's "Honky Tonk Night Time Man." Guy could pick.

Edit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7lxAlb_E9g

Skip to 27:00 and crack a beer
Last edited by getthefloydout at Apr 11, 2012,
#30
Quote by romencer17
It doesn't take an 'excellent player' to play what he plays, it's just different variations of the same chord progressions, a-c-d-e, repeat, repeat, etc. etc.


Oh I dunno, the rhythm patterns for Thunderstruck and It's a Long Way to the Top are not exactly straightforward.

And Malcom's timing is absolutely on the money whether the riff is very simple or more involved, you couldn't slide a sheet of paper between the gaps.

Also, I have never heard anyone play any AC/DC song nearly as well as AC/DC do them. It might not be rocket science in guitar terms, but they get absolutely spot on, every time.
#31
"Brian May gets little recognition, I feel. He's come up with some of the most recognizable riffs and licks and the like".

This. Is so very true. He's incredibly underrated. Alot of it I think has to do with Freddie Mercury. With a front man like that, yeah who's going to bother to take notice of the guitarist? Also alot of people seem to think that 'Bohemian Rhapsody' and 'We Will Rock You' yada yada yada... seem to be it for him. In early Queen, he created some INCREDIBLE songs with outstanding riffage and solos. An example, Brighton Rock. That is an incredible solo and some great technique. He just doesn't get as much credit as what he could because people really don't know him that well beyond BoRhap and We Will Rock You...
#32
Quote by getthefloydout
Allen Collins, Gary Rossington, and especially Ed King seem to get little to no credit (disregarding Allen Collins' solo on Freebird.) But I would have to say Steve Gaines in his all-too-short stint with Lynyrd Skynyrd. If you don't already know it, check out their cover of Merle Haggard's "Honky Tonk Night Time Man." Guy could pick.

Edit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7lxAlb_E9g

Skip to 27:00 and crack a beer



Yes! All the guitarists in LS were great! I think the fact that there was so many of them made people overlook them.
R.I.P Jon Lord, Rory Gallagher and Jimi!
#33
eric clapton, george harrison, john lennon, pearl jam guy, steve vai, stevie ray vaughn, jerry cantrell. what about most overrated?
#36
Rory Gallagher gets absolutely no love anywhere and to me could wipe teh floor with just about anyone.
It amazes me that the trinity of Beck Clapton and Page is held up as teh pinnacle of classic rock guitar and yet I believe Blackmore to be better than any of them
#37
Quote by MarkWilliam

It amazes me that the trinity of Beck Clapton and Page is held up as teh pinnacle of classic rock guitar and yet I believe Blackmore to be better than any of them


I believe they are rightfully held as the pinnacle of classic rock guitar. Look at their body of work and contributions to the guitar. Say what you want, but the quality of Richie Blackmore's body of work (while completely awesome) is not as prolific as Beck's, Clapton's and Page's.

And I saw Beck last year. He was outstanding. Blackmore couldn't make music like that.
#38
Quote by roushsn95
I believe they are rightfully held as the pinnacle of classic rock guitar. Look at their body of work and contributions to the guitar. Say what you want, but the quality of Richie Blackmore's body of work (while completely awesome) is not as prolific as Beck's, Clapton's and Page's.

And I saw Beck last year. He was outstanding. Blackmore couldn't make music like that.


I agree that Beck is unbelievable and. I'm not too sure about Page's body of work which thoroughly underwhelms me but that's a matter of opinion I guess
#39
Quote by MarkWilliam
Rory Gallagher gets absolutely no love anywhere and to me could wipe teh floor with just about anyone.


X 1000!

He was one of my guitar heroes when I was in my teens, and wish he were still among the living ...
Not only did he have chops out the ass, but he was one of the most expressive players I ever heard. The 'harmonics' solo on "Walk On Hot Coals" is still one of my favorites!
#40
Phil Collen of Def Leppard.

He's not underrated, but nobody really talks about him.
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