#1
My jazz band is doing a solo selection that includes a variation of basic 12 bar blues in Bb. I am playing a solo over it and I'm still in the process of experimenting with different cool things to do but I don't have too much knowledge when it comes to different types of scales.
I was wondering if anyone could suggest some scales to try over this progression

Bb7 / / / Eb7 / / / Bb7 / / / Bb7 / / / Eb7 / / / Eb7 / / / Bb7 / / / G7 / / / Cm7 / / / / F7 / / /
Bb7 / / G7 / / Cm7 / / F7 / /
#2
Bb Blues scales always works

Bb Db Eb E(natural) F Ab

On the Eb's play Bb Dorian
EZPZ
Quote by Banjocal
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#4
Its the blues man! ya gotta FEEL it!

Naw but seriously, Bb blues scale would do well, but it'll get a little boring.
#5
http://mikedodge.freeforums.org/blues-concepts-explained-t23.html?sid=a6c635758d1bc6dd57730e0b0b579f04

Thats a 13 part series called Blues Concepts Explained. It covers (in serious detail) that jazz blues progression you're trying to conquer.
#7
Quote by MikeDodge
http://mikedodge.freeforums.org/blues-concepts-explained-t23.html?sid=a6c635758d1bc6dd57730e0b0b579f04

Thats a 13 part series called Blues Concepts Explained. It covers (in serious detail) that jazz blues progression you're trying to conquer.


That's a good article.
I got bashed in another thread for saying much of that stuff!

Be careful here guys - we're not allowed to use scales here at UG
#8
All of the above. For the I - VI - ii - V at the end, although you can just use one scale over the lot, it may find it more interesting to negotiate those changes with arpeggios.

-----------7-10-9-8
---6-9-7-8-----------11-10
--7-----------------8
-8
------
-------


Combination of triplets and shuffle. You can work out the rhythm!

Edit: In fact, basically, the first 3 notes are triplets, the rest is a shuffle.
Last edited by mdc at Feb 15, 2012,
#9
If you want to do something a little bit different, try using the 5th mode of harmonic minor over each chord.
For example, over the Bb7, use Eb harmonic minor. Over Eb7, use Ab harmonic minor.
#10
Bb Blues scale (that's the minor pentatonic with an added tritone, which is mostly used as a passing note.) If you want to get a little more complicated, you could experiment with adding in the major third, as well.

But if you're relatively new at improvisation, use just use that and stop worrying about it.

Yes, you can learn some complex fancy scale and it'll work. The problem is that if you do that you're just moving around a scale, not thinking in music. Start with a SIMPLE scale and explore it's possibilities, thinking in MUSIC, not SHAPES.

The pentatonic is not limited or boring. It's incredibly flexible and powerful. It has the advantage of being simple enough to not overwhelm you when you're getting started - it gives you room to think in music, to compose creatively without being too fixated on what the details of the scale.

Since you're asking this question, I'm assuming that you're relatively new to improvisastion, in which case all I can say is, yes, do the pentatonic. Don't overthink it and don't try to do something more complicated. You will almost certainly produce something that is more musically interesting and enjoyable if you stay in the pentatonic and focus on it for a while.

(A know a high school jazz teacher who has had incredible success at producing successful musicians. One of the things he does is teach improvisation almost exclusively through the pentatonics. He knows that eventually his students will add more, but by keeping the focus squarely on the pentatonics he keeps the focus on music, rather than scales).