#1
Why hasn't the link been fixed yet? Side notes: How long should you have been taking lessons before you try playing slayer, maiden, or metallica? Furthermore, what should I do to increase my overall speed?
#2
Just practice slow and build up speed.
When you play with suitable speed, then you can learn songs you want to learn. Alternatively combine the two and practice the songs slower than they are and build up to full speed.
Quote by metaldood91
Hi. Can someone tell me which guitars are real 24 fret guitars and which are just 22 fret guitars with 2 extra frets added on?


http://www.youtube.com/user/Joeseffel


Quote by smcstoronto1234

So very true...
#3
1.However long you want; I learned lots of Angel of Death after only a few months playing. Of course, I still can't play it all but it's a work in progress. I have found that learning things like Slayer songs has increased my playing ability by a fair amount because I jumped in to playing metal the moment I started playing guitar. Metallica should be some quite easy learnings too. Also, lots of alternate picking really builds up your right arm's strength too I find. When you get more confident, I would recommend trying some Megadeth; they have some rather challenging songs and they use a lot less open E strumming than Slayer.

It's pretty obvious if you think of it, but what matters is what you can do and what you have learned- not how long you have been playing. To keep motivated I find that you really need to focus on playing what you want to play as well. Even if you can't play a whole Slayer song, you can still practice parts of it that are a bit easier.

2. If you want to increase your speed just keep pushing yourself, trying new things and using a metronome. When you hit a wall analyze what you're doing, pick out every little detail of what you could be doing more efficiently and practice that slowly. Just keep progressing and be patient with yourself; the results will come with persistant effort.
Quote by Jesus
Gaza Strip- home. At least it was before I fucked ereythang up...
#4
Once you have achieved a moderate playing technique, i.e. basic scales, chords, etc., you can begin to learn any song...The caveat is that you will need a simplified arrangement based upon your moderate technical level. As thrash metal is a bit more advanced than just basic power chords and simple scales, don't expect to play an advanced piece of music until you are an advanced player.

Speed a byproduct of accuracy and control. Study the concept of economy of motion and that will start you in the right direction. A good instructor always helps, too.
#5
I started learning songs that I love when I first started playing guitar. Master of Puppets was like the second or third full song that I learned on the guitar. I learned it and practiced it until my fingers bled. Learning it really helped me a lot with getting faster on the guitar.

But I didn't have anyone around me to help me with my technique, so a lot of times I just hurt my arm trying to downstroke the whole entire song.

So my recommendation would be to learn songs you like, but play them slowly and not at full speed. Especially Slayer. Concentrate on your technique, and when you have a question about something in one of the songs, we're here to help.
BEST GEAR IN THE WORLD

PRS Santana SE II with Dimarzio DP100 bridge P/up
BOSS ME-50
Fender Frontman 65r
Line 6 Pocket POD
Dunlop Jazz III picks
#6
Okay and @MatthiasYoung what do you mean about economy of motion?
#7
hey man, I remember vividly how I struggled with electric guitar early on. I had an acoustic for the first 6 months, and played it for HOURS a day, like 4-6. When I got my first electric guitar about 6 months in, I had to learn soooo much to get the tone, technique, and skills make it sound like metallica or maiden (electric is much more involved than acoustic, and don't let guitar snobs tell you any different, there is a myriad of techniques that are usually electric only such as pinch harmonics, palm muting, down picking, tap harmonics, tapping, sweep picking, double stop bends, muting in general, gallops, whammy bar, wah pedal, etc. not to mention how well trained your ear has to be just to get treble, mid, bass, gain, presence, etc. to sound right from your amp)

The point is, don't ever let any of this get you down. So what master of puppets is really fast for down picking, ANYONE can learn to do it, including you. I learned fade to black, one, and master of puppets (all excluding main solos of course) within my first six months. They were doable, do you know why? Because I love those songs. Thats all it takes man. If you can't get maiden out of your head, play maiden. It is soooo much easier to play music that you love and know inside and out, than to try to learn some djent or acoustic chord crap because thats where people tell you to start. **** that, if you love metallic, maiden, and slayer, play that shit right now!!! Do you know how hard it is to remember the rhythm to songs you hate? It's damn right impossible.

You have all the time in the world to learn "Waking up Beside you (acoustic)", "Mr. Jones", "Needle in the Hay", and "You've got to hide your love away" (sorry, examples of acoustic crap that I like.) Learn what you like, learn what made you pick up the guitar, not the crap anyone else tells you to. One day, you will pull out your acoustic and be like "I want to learn some songs on this puppy", but until that day, learn your favorite songs. Inside and out.

My 2 cents.
#8
hate to be a double posting d-bag but to answer your question...

economy of motion is basically what people around here (the most helpful and accurate being Freepower) myself included, tell people first learning technique. It doesn't matter that you are slow and shitty. What matters is that your are practicing proper technique, because just playing with proper technique for a long time will make you better and better, you won't hit a wall. If you learn how to properly hold your pick, put your left hand on the frets/neck, relax your arm/elbow/shoulder, etc. You WILL be a good guitarist one day.

Things such as tension (anywhere), bad technique (anywhere), and pain (anywhere) need to be avoided at all times as well as using the smallest amount of motion you need to play any given passage. Watch any of your guitar heroes tremelo pick and notice how they are barely moving their wrists and usually not moving their fingers/shoulders/elbows/arms at all (or slightly). It is all about being relaxed and free of tension. I am trying to remember how freepower sums it up, but that's about it. Guitar should never hurt or cause unneeded tension.
#9
I noticed tension in my wrist when I took a meter stick to get a feel for various scales.I had the wrist parallel to the stick yet my wrist had to bend. I hope to take a pic of this when I get my guitar today (yes HNGD to me and I will have an NGD thread). What am I doing wrong?
#10
is your wrist straight? You want it as straight as possible. Make sure your thumb is on the back of the neck and your fingers are curled around the guitar.

Since you might not have your guitar yet, look at your left palm. Take your fingers and thumb and press them together, this is basically how you want to play the guitar, the neck should be between your thumb and fingers, this gives your fingers enough room to stretch and play chords and wont hurt you as relying on your thumb builds muscle.

Like this for holding the neck: proper neck holdage

and pick here: how to hold ya pick

I tried to get the pictures off those pages, but I fail at internets. Anyways, both those pages have proper pictures of how one should hold the guitar and pick without discomfort.
Last edited by hansome21 at Feb 17, 2012,
#11
Quote by N1K156
Okay and @MatthiasYoung what do you mean about economy of motion?


Economy of Motion is a general term for efficient use, but when applied to the guitar, it's meaning that you are achieving the most with the least amount of effort.

Specifically, if you a playing a rapid succession of notes on 1 string, how far away does your pick move from the string after striking it? Is there extra hand motion, arm motion? And with the LH, are fingers relaxing after playing a note or are they being "lifted" from the fretboard?

These are all subtleties in one's technique, but can make a huge difference when trying to increase speed.
#12
Actually, this is my first full-size guitar. I have a 3/4 scale acoustic from when I was 9...my instructor moved to Asia 2 years after I started, and I got bored for 3 years...picking it back up now.
#13
You should read at least the first 2 chapters here:

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/the-guitar-blueprint-to-success/

It is not about after how much time you will be able to play x or y song it is rather about what your goals are with guitar playing.

If you just want to make covers then you just take a guitar pro tab and take the tab you want to learn, you learn the riffs and you're done.

If you want to understand what is going on in those songs you should start with the basics and build from there.

Read the ebook and you will have a clear picture
#14
Quote by N1K156
Why hasn't the link been fixed yet? Side notes: How long should you have been taking lessons before you try playing slayer, maiden, or metallica? Furthermore, what should I do to increase my overall speed?

You can increase your speed using a metronome and practicing exercises and scales over it, I suggest you find a music teacher, it will help a lot, cheers.
#15
Quote by apajr
You should read at least the first 2 chapters here:

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/the-guitar-blueprint-to-success/

It is not about after how much time you will be able to play x or y song it is rather about what your goals are with guitar playing.

If you just want to make covers then you just take a guitar pro tab and take the tab you want to learn, you learn the riffs and you're done.

If you want to understand what is going on in those songs you should start with the basics and build from there.

Read the ebook and you will have a clear picture



I am trying to download the ebook but it's no possible.
#16
Quote by bapguitar
You can increase your speed using a metronome and practicing exercises and scales over it, I suggest you find a music teacher, it will help a lot, cheers.

Any good scales I should practice?
#17
Read or re-read "READ THIS STICKY (guide to all techniques)", you need it.
And forget about playing scales, and maybe even exercises, with a metronome. First just get used to playing them normally. Just pick a scale, play it in all positions until you remember it and then start to play it in different patterns.. Like if you have a C Major scale that goes of course C D E F G A B C, play it like C D E F - D E F G - E F G A. And make other ones up.

Just play it in a controlled manner with good technique.

Don't rush with guitar really, just play it controlled and you won't have to go through the basics later.. As much.
#18
Okay then...I got suggested Angel of Death...seems I'm gonna give it a go, may get lessons soon .
#19
Make sure your not skipping through things like proper picking and left hand techniques.
The more time you put into making your hands as accurate as possible when first starting the faster and easier you will be able to pick up and play harder songs.

(And you wont be like me some 14 years down the road pissed off that no one bothered to tell me the same thing as I'm telling you >.>
#20
Quote by Quesenek
Make sure your not skipping through things like proper picking and left hand techniques.
The more time you put into making your hands as accurate as possible when first starting the faster and easier you will be able to pick up and play harder songs.

(And you wont be like me some 14 years down the road pissed off that no one bothered to tell me the same thing as I'm telling you >.>

Okay...finished tuning the guitar half step down...may get a capo and keep the guitar at Eb.