#1
Hey guys and girls.

I'm doing a dissertation for my final year at university,
about technology and guitaring.

Basically I've popped into music shops and interviewed a few bands on this and they all say the guitar will never change! - They just want it kept real and guitar like.

I can see why.

But now I'm looking at why it won't change, what makes the guitar just so god damn brilliant!?

Hopefully you guys who are interested can share your opinions on this!

So that's the question I propose:

Why is the guitar just so good?

Go ahead

And if you want to check out some digital guitars, try the Misa Kitara, or the Chameleon guitar. Also I've been looking at the Synth Axe and the Variax.

Any more guitars like this please let me know!
And if there are any books you've read about how we as people can 'emotionallly connect' to guitars (or similar topics which may be of use!) please post them up here.

Thanks a bunch! (Help me get a first class degree :P)

#2
Because it fuels my lifelong erection. This is why it will never die.
#3
The guitar is amidst a technological revolution. The concept of strings on a fretboard with volume and tone knobs and pickups and input jacks and strap buttons and tuners will never change.
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#4
The guitar doesn't change, it evolves. Take how it's tuned for example. Standard tuning is EBGDAE (from highest to lowest), but I'm sure that you'll have a bunch of different people in this forum who use something different. I myself use DAFCGD. The shape of the guitar also evolves. There's always new "guitar heroes" being discovered who have their own signature designs for the guitar as well as electronics.

The guitar itself is just such an expressive and flexible instrument that it's possible for nearly anyone to pick it up and write a hit song, or a relaxing groove, or a headbanging masterpiece. It's easy to learn and sounds beautiful.

Those are just my two cents.
#5
Guitars don't change because they don't need change. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
Americans love American football. They tried to make an XFL or whatever and no one gave a shit, so it was axed. Same thing here. Why change something so many musicians have gotten used to and love?
#7
For me personally, it's the simple fact of versatility. You can use a guitar in literally any genre of music and make it sound perfect accordingly. Not only that, you can use the same guitar to play metal, jazz, blues, pop etc. You can make a guitar sound like any sound you want with effects, with whatever scale you decide to use and the guitar attached to everyone in one form or another. Whether you listen to music with guitars or not, whenever you see a guitar, there's a connection. Whenever you hear a soulful solo played, regardless of what you listen to, you pay attention. The guitar is literally the most versatile, personally connecting, dynamic instrument around and no matter how much time passes, the guitar will ALWAYS be significant (plus, who the hell doesn't like a guitarist).
#8
Because it works how it is. It's remained relatively unchanged since it was made. It's a simple and effective design.
#9
Quote by SLEESTAK_BRO
I think it will become more electronic, not that I want it to. Just look at today's music in general, it's much more electronic than than it was 30 years ago.


During the late 70s, early 80s? I don't think so. That's when everybody was experimenting with electronics.
Since electronics were incorporated into music, we've had artists that use them and ones that don't. That's how it will be for the most part, save for mainstream pop music which will stick to mostly electronic.
#11
It's mainly because:
A) The guitar is a hybrid of digital and acoustic technology
B) The guitar is one of, if not the most versatile sounding instruments ever invented.
Check out my band Disturbed
#12
Quote by Pagan_Poetry
During the late 70s, early 80s? I don't think so. That's when everybody was experimenting with electronics.
Since electronics were incorporated into music, we've had artists that use them and ones that don't. That's how it will be for the most part, save for mainstream pop music which will stick to mostly electronic.

Not necessarily the music itself will become more electronic, but how it's played. Everyone now records on computers, so there are a lot more options in the studio. And digital/synth guitars (like the variax) are becoming a lot more common. And it's not so much "don't fix it if it ain't broken" as it is because it can be done.
Last edited by SLEESTAK_BRO at Feb 15, 2012,
#13
Music is not about being technological or efficient or anything, its just supposed to sound good. And what sounds good is usually not the "perfect" things. Thats why instruments and such dont really evolve much, there is no need. But people always find new ways to make noise, so its very possible that the guitar wont play nearly as big of a role in the future as it does in the music today.
#14
Quote by flxjhnlrssn
Music is not about being technological or efficient or anything, its just supposed to sound good. And what sounds good is usually not the "perfect" things. Thats why instruments and such dont really evolve much, there is no need. But people always find new ways to make noise, so its very possible that the guitar wont play nearly as big of a role in the future as it does in the music today.



It already doesn't have a big role.
Check out my band Disturbed
#16
Quote by StewieSwan
It already doesn't have a big role.

Was that supposed to be funny?
#17
Quote by SLEESTAK_BRO
Not necessarily the music itself will become more electronic, but how it's played. Everyone now records on computers, so there are a lot more options in the studio. And digital/synth guitars (like the variax) are becoming a lot more common. And it's not so much "don't fix it if it ain't broken" as it is because it can be done.


Ah yes. In that case you're pretty accurate.
#19
The guitar is a great instrument, as well as a great concept. It's often referred to as "the easiest instrument to learn, and the hardest to master." It's something that you can kind of always be getting better at, there's always another thing to try, so it allows for endless innovation. Plus, people love to individualize everything. It's nice to have something set up just so that it fits perfectly with you, and guitars are all very different from each other before you even begin to tinker with them. I think that's why people get so attached to their axes.

But I don't think it will stay the same forever. I think people will play it as far as the foreseeable future, but I think the materials and stuff used to make it will change drastically as the common tonewoods begin to run out.

Check these out. They aren't any different from a regular guitar, but they're made from completely different materials.

http://www.aristidesinstruments.com/
#20
Actually the guitar has changed a lot, but the piano on the other hand...