#1
My teacher never went over this so I never really understood it. I'm kind of just putting two and two together and I think I'm right. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Key of C
C= I
Dm= ii
Em= iii
F= IV
G= V
Am= vi
B°= vii°(I'm pretty sure it's diminished)
C= I or VIII?

I'm pretty sure this is correct, no?
Thanks.
"For me it's important to be in balance. To not let fear get in the way of things, to not worry so much about protecting yourself all the time."

"Muskrats live in my wah wah pedal."

-John Frusciante-
Last edited by JFisJC at Feb 15, 2012,
#2
Looks good to me, but that final C, it's just the I again, not VIII.

But do you know what it means? Can you do this for other keys?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#3
Yes but there is no such thing as a VIII. You can say "8th" (octave) of a chord but VIII chord is simply I.

EDIT: Only one problem that B° should be Bø or more commonly Bmin7b5. B fully diminished isn't diatonic.
Last edited by Sóknardalr at Feb 15, 2012,
#4
Quote by AlanHB
Looks good to me, but that final C, it's just the I again, not VIII.

But do you know what it means? Can you do this for other keys?

Yes, I can do it for all of the major keys, as for the minor keys, not off the top of my head. I'd have to work it out first.

Quote by Sóknardalr
Yes but there is no such thing as a VIII. You can say "8th" (octave) of a chord but VIII chord is simply I.

EDIT: Only one problem that B° should be Bø or more commonly Bmin7b5. B fully diminished isn't diatonic.

What exactly is a Bø?
"For me it's important to be in balance. To not let fear get in the way of things, to not worry so much about protecting yourself all the time."

"Muskrats live in my wah wah pedal."

-John Frusciante-
#5
Quote by JFisJC
Yes, I can do it for all of the major keys, as for the minor keys, not off the top of my head. I'd have to work it out first.


What exactly is a Bø?


Half diminished. It is a confusing term which is why I prefer the self-explanatory min7b5. Minor seventh chord with a flat five. A fully diminished chord contains a diminished seventh instead of a minor seventh. This of course assumes you harmonize the chords to their seventh degree, but it is misleading to call the vii triad simply diminished, because "diminished" means it has bb7.
#6
Quote by Sóknardalr
Half diminished. It is a confusing term which is why I prefer the self-explanatory min7b5. Minor seventh chord with a flat five. A fully diminished chord contains a diminished seventh instead of a minor seventh. This of course assumes you harmonize the chords to their seventh degree, but it is misleading to call the vii triad simply diminished, because "diminished" means it has bb7.


No offense to either of you but I'm pretty sure the TS doesn't know what you are talking about and you are just making them more confused. It certainly took me a while to understand when I was just starting to learn music theory.

Also you would be right if they were talking about diatonic seventh chords but I'm assuming the TS is talking about triads. viio would be correct.

TS, this wasn't directed to you any way so don't feel bad if you don't understand it yet. And yes you are right, except a C Major chord will always be a I chord in the key of C no matter what octave so you would never call it a VIII chord.
#7
Quote by Sóknardalr
This of course assumes you harmonize the chords to their seventh degree, but it is misleading to call the vii triad simply diminished, because "diminished" means it has bb7.

Trough the words you used, calling a diminished triad a "diminished triad" give you all the information you need.
You only need to worry about fully diminished vs half diminished when the 7th is in there.
Otherwise, a diminished TRIAD is always root, m3, dim5.
Quote by Banjocal
sht up u flthy librl foogit stfu u soo mad n butthurdt ur ass is an analpocolypse cuz ur so gay "my ass hrts so mcuh" - u. your rectally vexed n anlly angushed lolo go bck 2 asslnd lolol
#8
Quote by King Of Suede
Trough the words you used, calling a diminished triad a "diminished triad" give you all the information you need.
You only need to worry about fully diminished vs half diminished when the 7th is in there.
Otherwise, a diminished TRIAD is always root, m3, dim5.


In most cases, usually classical sheet music as far as I know, B° denotes a diminished seventh chord with its root on B. A B chord with a minor third and a diminished fifth isn't "truly" diminished at all. I guess you could just write Bm(b5) which is what Guitar Pro does I believe, but a better solution would be to harmonize to the seventh in all cases. Why use a simple triad? Diminished chords carry a lot of tension on their own. Adding the diminished seventh doesn't really make it more tense (slightly perhaps), whereas you would avoid using a major seventh on the tonic chord because it creates tension.
#10
Quote by griffRG7321
vii° implies a diminished triad.

vii°7 implies a diminished 7th


From Wikipedia:

In most sheet music books, Cdim or C° denotes a diminished seventh chord with root C; but it may also happen, mostly in modern jazz books and some music theory literature, that Cdim or C° denotes a diminished triad chord, while Cdim7 or C°7 denotes a diminished seventh chord.
#11
A diminished triad stacks three minor thirds from the starting note.

Starting from "C", that would be, C (""root"*), Eb ("3rd"), Gb ("5th").

A diminished 7th chord, stacks four minor 3rds.

Starting from "C", that would be, C (""root"*), Eb ("3rd"), Gb ("5th"), A ("7th").

Any diminished chord can be named after any note in it! This is why I put quotation marks around the scale degrees, just to help you count up the scale.

(A "minor 3rd is 3 semi tones). (you do have to learn that right from the start).


An "augmented" chord, stacks >>either three or four << MAJOR THIRDS. (A major 3rd is FOUR semi tones, and all the same rules apply to it, as to its diminished cousin.