#1
Hello,
I have a taylor 210e western guitar and the d-string buzzes. It only buzzes when I play it without holding a note or when I play the very first "E" note on that string. Each note after that does not buzz. Also when I lower the tuning of that string from a D to a C, the buzzing stops. Adding to that, when I play the string with the flesh of my thumb it does buzz more than it would with a nail or "thumb-pick". With those "investigations" I assume that the string buzzes due to touching the first and/or second fret. By "lowering" the tuning of the string, the string does also vibrate less and does not touch the first/second fret, which kinda justifies my assumption a bit.

When I first bought that guitar (16 months ago), I did not have those problems, it started like 4 months ago. Recently I also started experimenting between different 0.012 strings from d'addario to martin and finally dean markley and all those D-strings do buzz, some more, some less. But overall it is annoying.

What I already did to prevent this:
- trying different strings
- adjusting the truss rod
- I did put some stuff underneath the saddle, to get the strings a little bit higher
- - First I tried to put a .6 mm thick string underneath it > did not help
- - Second I put a 1.3 mm thick sting > did not help
- - Third I tried to put a nearly 2 mm thick toothpick underneath it, but that was too thick and saddle would flip over each time I tried to "tune" the strings.

What I could do:
- Play on 0.011 thick strings > do not want because I don't like the sound
- buy a much higher saddle

What I will do:
I will go to a guitar shop on Monday and ask for some "professional advice", but is there anything left for me to do by myself to prevent that buzzing?

Thanks for any help and best regards,
deavilaxn
#3
Yes, I do. I'm not that familiar with the English guitar terms and I wasn't always sure, whether the one I used were correct or not. But overall I hope, that one can understand what I wrote.
Last edited by deavilaxn at Feb 16, 2012,
#4
In most cases, when a string(s) start to buzz, it is usually caused by a change in humidity, air that is too dry is usual suspect. Get a hygrometer and monitor your RH. Also see the sticky in this forum - Humidity, a friendly reminder.
I'm the only player to be sponsered by 7 guitar companies not to use their products.
#5
I have the same problem and have yet to find a solution. Mine however, only buzzes when I strum it harder than usual.
Quote by smirnoff_black
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#6
Quote by BlackbirdPie
In most cases, when a string(s) start to buzz, it is usually caused by a change in humidity, air that is too dry is usual suspect. Get a hygrometer and monitor your RH. Also see the sticky in this forum - Humidity, a friendly reminder.

That might be the solution... Will check that over the next days!