#1
Hello I am really confused on how to play the major pentatonic scale as from my understanding it is the same positions as the minor pentatonic scale. I know the 5 positions over the neck but how do I take this and play the major pentatonic? If someone can clear this up for me I would really appreciate it. Thanks

Tom
#4
The easiest thing to do is to take the patterns you already know and shift them all down three frets.

I.e Position one (asuming youre using two notes per string) of the A minor pentatonci scale starts on the E string of the fifth fret.

move it down to F# (still using the same shape) and hey preston, A major pentatonic.
#5
Quote by LivinJoke84
The easiest thing to do is to take the patterns you already know and shift them all down three frets.

I.e Position one (asuming youre using two notes per string) of the A minor pentatonci scale starts on the E string of the fifth fret.

move it down to F# (still using the same shape) and hey preston, A major pentatonic.


I think TS should learn the notes instead of the patterns.
Woffelz

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#6
When you are referring to the major and minor pentatonic scales being the "same position," I believe you are referring to what is called relative major and minor.

To find a relative minor, you simply take the 6th of the major scale. To find a relative major, you take the third of the minor scale. For example, the G major pentatonic will be the same notes, and hence the same position/shape on the fretboard, as the E minor pentatonic. You know this because the 6th of the G major scale is E.

So yes, a minor pentatonic will be the same shape as it's relative major. For example, if you're playing a song in G, you can use either the G major or E minor scales. This applies to pentatonics as well, since the pentatonic scale is simply 5 of the 7 notes in a traditional scale.
#7
Quote by aildeokl
When you are referring to the major and minor pentatonic scales being the "same position," I believe you are referring to what is called relative major and minor.

To find a relative minor, you simply take the 6th of the major scale. To find a relative major, you take the third of the minor scale. For example, the G major pentatonic will be the same notes, and hence the same position/shape on the fretboard, as the E minor pentatonic. You know this because the 6th of the G major scale is E.

So yes, a minor pentatonic will be the same shape as it's relative major. For example, if you're playing a song in G, you can use either the G major or E minor scales. This applies to pentatonics as well, since the pentatonic scale is simply 5 of the 7 notes in a traditional scale.


Yeah I understand this I just didnt know how to apply it. It now makes sense. Thanks for taking your time to explain this guys. Cheers
#8
The way I understand it, is that you use your first finger for the root for minor and you use your pinky for major. So playing in C minor, you would have your first finger on the 8th fret on the low E string on pattern 1. If you were playing major you would have your pinky on the 8th fret of the low E string on pattern 1.
#9
Quote by Woffelz
I think TS should learn the notes instead of the patterns.


This. Patterns are useful and helpful, but you should be concerned with knowing the notes you are playing
Quote by Xiaoxi
The Byzantine scale was useful until the Ottoman scale came around and totally annihilated it.
#10
The major-ness or minor-ness of the pentatonic will depend on what note is serving as your tonic.

So, for example, A minor pentatonic is A C D E G. Well, those notes are also C major pentatonic. Are you in Am or C maj? Well, that depends on the song. Are your licks resolving to C or to A?

(First position, second position etc aren't official terms. Everybody learns them differently, so it's not easy to know what you mean by that).
#11
Quote by HotspurJr
The major-ness or minor-ness of the pentatonic will depend on what note is serving as your tonic.

So, for example, A minor pentatonic is A C D E G. Well, those notes are also C major pentatonic. Are you in Am or C maj? Well, that depends on the song. Are your chords resolving to C or to A?

(First position, second position etc aren't official terms. Everybody learns them differently, so it's not easy to know what you mean by that).


Fixed.
Woffelz

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