#1
Hi, I need to get an acoustic bass for my band but I have absolutely no idea where to start or what to look at. I'd like an electro-acoustic and the kind of sound I'd want is something with a lot of variety, but I mainly play indie music (think Arctic Monkeys, Strokes, Libertines and Radiohead) and that's the general sound of our band.

Budget isn't too much of a problem, the less money I spend is ideal obviously but I have around £300-400 to play with and want to get something with a bit of quality. I don't mind going second hand, my nearest city would be Manchester in England but I'll probably just order something off the internet. I've been looking at some Ibanez's but again I'm not really sure where to go! Any advice would be great, thanks!
#2
This gets asked quite a bit on the forum so you may want to engage the search bar and look at previous threads.

However, if you are going to end up amplified in the gig in some sort of fashion, honestly, I've found that a Precision bass with flats ends up a much better and flexible option that can move between playing with acoustic guitars and still hold its own in a traditional rock situation. Just my two pence.
#3
It's mainly just for full acoustic shows, I wouldn't need to switch between electric and acoustic. We also practice a lot just acoustically so it'd be good to have one for that. I'll have a look for previous threads, cheers.
#4
From another thread

http://www.talkbass.com/forum/f8/re...coustic-845119/
http://www.talkbass.com/forum/f8/lo...-guitar-829368/
http://www.talkbass.com/forum/f8/acoustic-electric-bass-live-854961/

ABG's have limitations; specifically, acoustic volume. Make sure you understand these issues so you wont be disappointed after your purchase. There's a reason they come with onboard electronics.

That being said, I play and gig an acoustic 100% of the time. No slab comes close.
#5
hard to hear a bass next to a acoustic guitar especially an ensemble, that's why people switched from uprights to electric.
#6
Quote by askrere
hard to hear a bass next to a acoustic guitar especially an ensemble, that's why people switched from uprights to electric.


This is the reason I sold all but one of my AGBs and now gig with the acoustic guitarists with a Pbass copy and a battery powered amp. I can always turn down the amp but turning up an unplugged acoustic bass is a little hard.
#7
Quote by askrere
hard to hear a bass next to a acoustic guitar especially an ensemble, that's why people switched from uprights to electric.


Kinda depends on the players.
Put a knuckle bleeding headbanger next to a weak bassist... yeah, you got a problem.
Put a strong bassist with the right setup next to a guitarist who has a concept of volume and dynamics, it's a different story.
Yes.. venue matters.

Portability and intonation were also a part of the upright to electric switch.

This is the reason I sold all but one of my AGBs and now gig with the acoustic guitarists with a Pbass copy and a battery powered amp. I can always turn down the amp but turning up an unplugged acoustic bass is a little hard.


Tone and comfort aside... wouldn't you be able to turn down the amp with a plugged in acoustic?
#8
This exact thread was made last week...

If you think you're going to be playing this anywhere without amplification and be heard, you are wrong. If you play with people it will be hard to be heard even in practice, think about it, the frequencies take large wattage to be heard electrically, your trying to do it with a chunky acoustic.

You get what you pay for, cheap acoustics have horrible intonation and sound, and when your trying to produce clean clear bass sound, you don't want buzzing strings and dead notes.

Yea it looks the part of an acoustic ensemble, but the sound is not common, a lot of artists play acoustic guitars and have flat wound electric basses with foam mutes (sometimes) for a more upright feel.

I'd get a Beatle bass copy, string it with some nice flats and get a little combo. Super portable, classy, and sounds warm and pleasant and looks the part.