#1
I guess this can double as my intro post. My name is Will and I've been playing guitar for about 4 months now. I've owned a few cheesy guitars (Squiers, Silvertone, and a Peavy) but I was given a Gibson Les Paul Studio Deluxe for Christmas. I know that's way too much guitar for someone that has only been playing for 4 months, but I've been practicing an hour or two per day and I'm dedicated to growing into the Gibson and taking care of it properly, which brings me to the questions to be addressed in this post.

I want to maintain the performance as well as the value of the guitar for the long term. The studio deluxe did not come with a pick guard, but Gibson sells pick guards for that model. Do you think the guitar would be worth more 40 years from now with the OE pick guard? Note that if I buy it, I would have Guitar Center install it - I wouldn't install it myself.

My second question is about straps. I think the Gibson guitar should be matched with a Gibson strap. Since I know nothing about guitars, I don't know if that is the best way to maximize value later on or which strap matches and performs the best. I'd rather spend $150 on a strap that doesn't match perfectly but doesn't drop my guitar. What do you recommend?

Right now, I'm collecting the little pieces that might not be available in the future. I have about a hundred Gibson picks and 10 packs of "vintage re-issue" Gibson strings, the Gibson case, all the paperwork, etc. The end goal is in 40 years, I want to have a Guitar and accessories that I can be really proud of.
#2
I don't really think a pick guard will increase the value of a guitar and there only held in with 2 screws which is a simple job to do yourself instead of paying a fortune for a guitar shop to do for you.

A strap doesn't have to 'match' the guitar, if your cautious about the guitar comimg of the strap id recommend you to get strap locks or one of them dimarzio straps which lock on to your guitar and there only £20 or so.
#3
With all due respect, you're getting ahead of yourself here. Are you building a Gibson museum or do you want to learn to play guitar? If you're still playing 40 years from now you'll likely have moved on from this guitar a while before then. And regarding value, original equals value so I wouldn't add the pickguard. And don't worry about the strap. Any decent strap will do the job as long as it's firmly anchored to your guitar.
Last edited by Spud Spudly at Feb 17, 2012,
#4
Congrats on the guitar, I'm sure it will serve you well. Here is a small piece of advice for you: don't treat this guitar like a collectors piece. Stop worrying about the value in 40 years, it probably will not be a very sought after guitar. That doesn't mean you shouldn't take care of your guitar though, keep it clean and maintain it regularly and the guitar will be with you for years!
#5
A studio moodel isn't really going to appreciate in value unless it's a limited run. It's great to have a nice guitar 40 years from now and it probably won't depreciate much if you take good care of it but in the long run play it. Studios were made for people who didn't want to spend 2-4 grand for an axe they were going to play the hell out of. I take care of all of my guitars but I reserve my Gibby for playing at home, while every other guitar I own I will use to play out. I've thought about a Studio LP for playing out just because it's got a little better tone than the Epi I currently use.

I personally like pick guards on LP's and would install one if I bought a LP that didn't have one. That has nothing to do with de-valuing the guitar if done right unless it's a vintage guitar or a limite/special run or signature model.

As for the strap, what's comfortable is all that matters. Want to make sure your guitar is secure? Strap locks will do that just fine.

Most of all just enjoy your axe. Gibson makes a wonderful instrument that is a real player's axe. Play it, take care of it but most of all don't b afraid to manhandle it and make some music. That will be worth more to you than any resale value ever will be.
My Gear:

Jackson RR3 Pro
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Marshall MA100

"Grunge was invented for people who can't play solos"
#6
All of the energy you are wasting collecting Gibson-branded flotsam needs to be re-focused onto playing. You have taken things way too far. It will make no difference in 40 years whether you're playing with Gibson picks, and those strings are going to rust out in 10 years anyway if you don't use them.

Wouldn't you much, much rather be a really good player in 40 years than a mediocre one surrounded by Gibson-branded trinkets? Get some Schaller straplocks on your guitar, and learn how to restring it and adjust the truss rod properly. Those are the practical additions and skills that will actually be valuable to you over the years.

If you really want to have a guitar and accessories that you will be proud of in 40 years, stop buying accessories just because they have Gibson logos on them. Go try a bunch of strings and picks and figure out what works best for you. Gibson strings are made by D'Addario and their picks aren't anything special, so if you want "accessories" in the utilitarian and not the "Coach purse to go with my outfit" sense, you really need to branch out and understand what's actually good. You need to be proud of things you use because they work for you, not because they have name recognition.
#7
The Studio Deluxe is really a middle-range guitar and probably won't appreciate in value - there are just too many of them out there. As for strap - Ernie Ball has a nylon-strap for like $5 or something. No need to spend more, if you ask me. Just get Schaller Straplocks to go with it.

A pickguard means screwing into the wood of the guitar - which would likely lessen the value. Many LP players get rid of it the first thing they do - why the hell would anyone want to install it on a guitar that is blessed with no fu'cking ugly screw holes in it?

Focus on playing instead of collecting.
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Last edited by HomerSGR at Feb 17, 2012,
#8
If you're still playing 40 years from now you'll likely have moved on from this guitar a while before then. And regarding value, original equals value so I wouldn't add the pickguard. And don't worry about the strap.(Invalid img)
#9
In about 40 years, the guitar will sell for about 65-70% of it's original value regardless of what you do to it. It's not a collector's piece.
#10
So I'd be better off doing my research and playing around with other stuff other than OE. I'm a car guy at heart, and usually the OE stuff 40 years down the road maintains the resale value on cars that are collectible, I guess that's not the case with mid-range guitars.

I love my guitar and it means the world to me already. Right now, I've been going to a guitar center and asking them what needs to be done to maintain it and they've been pretty skimpy with maintenance (or at least versus what I think I should spend). The guitar is essentially brand-new. I can tune the guitar myself, but I've read about more complex issues like truss rod adjustments and adjusting the bridge and action of the guitar - is that something I should ask about or is that for older guitars?
#11
Quote by hiebertw07
The end goal is in 40 years, I want to have a Guitar and accessories that I can be really proud of.

then play the hell out of it for 40 years.

done.
#12
Quote by hiebertw07
I can tune the guitar myself, but I've read about more complex issues like truss rod adjustments and adjusting the bridge and action of the guitar - is that something I should ask about or is that for older guitars?

Truss rod and bridge/action are just routine maintenance things you should be able to do whenever the guitar needs them.

Quote by hiebertw07
So I'd be better off doing my research and playing around with other stuff other than OE. I'm a car guy at heart, and usually the OE stuff 40 years down the road maintains the resale value on cars that are collectible, I guess that's not the case with mid-range guitars.

Original (not OM...original to that guitar) holds value. The problem is, the things you're asking about don't matter at all. The picks and the strings aren't going to make the guitar any more valuable than what radio station the car has on the dial when it's sold. You're thinking way too hard about this. If you want to be a guitar collector, you have the wrong guitar. If you want to be a guitar player, you need to change your approach to the instrument.
#13
Original (not OM...original to that guitar) holds value. The problem is, the things you're asking about don't matter at all. The picks and the strings aren't going to make the guitar any more valuable than what radio station the car has on the dial when it's sold. You're thinking way too hard about this. If you want to be a guitar collector, you have the wrong guitar. If you want to be a guitar player, you need to change your approach to the instrument.


Gotcha. Make the guitar work for me, not the other way around.

Thank you guys for all your advice. I'm probably just going to lurk around for a bit and pick up on what you guys are saying. Thanks again!
#14
First thing to note is that any changes - even if they seem like upgrades at the time - devalue a guitar. The only way for a guitar to retain maximum value on the second hand market is to be in absolutely original condition.
This does, of course, also mean you shouldn't play it. You hear stories of guitars from the 50s and 60s selling for huge sums of money, but in reality those are rather exceptional cases and nearly every time it's a guitar that someone stuck in their basement or attic or closet and forgot about for decades. The guitars from that period that actually got used aren't worth even half as much. They're still worth a lot of money, of course, but nowhere near as much as the near-mint condition ones. So as an investment, you want to lock your guitar away and never touch it again.

But like al112987 said, your guitar won't be worth any notable amount in the future anyway. The fact is, the woods that make the early guitars so valuable isn't around any more, at least not freely for manufacture. The techniques used to make guitars now are different, parts are different. The prized 50s and 60s guitars are worth what they are because there will never be guitars like them ever again. They're an endangered species. On the other hand, the Gibson Les Paul Studios and Standards of today are made by the hundreds each week.

So that's point one.

Point two is that if you want to keep your guitar safe on its strap, don't worry about the strap itself; buy and fit some straplocks. There's various kinds, though Schaller are the most popular and generally considered to be the safest.

Which brings me on to point three: do not entrust your guitar to Guitar Center for any modifcations, set up or servicing. The guys there know no more than you do, they are not qualified and experienced guitar technicians. Either take your guitar to a proper guitar tech or learn how to fit, fix and set up your guitar yourself. It's not hard and will save you a lot of money.
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#15
Just treat it like you would any other guitar. It's a 1200$ toy - adjust everything so it's comfortable to you, customize it, modify it, do whatever you want to it so long as it's to your taste.

I'm not trying to insult your guitar but I really doubt 2011 gibson studios will go down in history as a collectors must-have. It's not going to be your retirement plan, or your future childrens retirement plan, or even their childrens retirement plan. It should be passed on as a guitar that was well played, not a guitar that was babied.
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#16
1st... Welcome!

2nd... Seriously thank who ever bought you that gift.

3rd... No guitar is too much guitar. If you stick with it, it is something that will give you a lifetime of enjoyment. And if setup properly, can make learning a pleasurable experience.

As for the pick guard, if it didn't come with one, then leave it alone (IMHO). UNLESS you are a heavy handed strummer and your pick is constantly contacting the body on you follow-thru. Then, for the sake of protection, put one on.

The strap should hold the guitar up and be comfortable. It need be nothing more than that. If you want something fancy, go for it... as long as it is comfortable.

I have many many picks I have collected over the years (many probably older than you). None of them are special. You will lose them, break them, and wear them out. Its what they do! Unless they are real tortoise shell, they hold no value.

Those Gibson strings will be useless in less than a few years. Even sealed in their original packaging, things age, and unused (yet old) strings may not hold tune or intonate well. I know, I found a set of strings (still sealed) in a case I hadn't opened in 12 years. I strung them up and immediately ran into tuning and intonation problems... lesson learned. Fresh strings for a fresh setup.

And as for future value... expect it to have more sentimental value than actual... unless you become a Rock Star.

Again... welcome and enjoy!
--- Joe ---
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