#1
Hey!

I've been doing some chord theory lately,
I know that major chords are based on the 1-3-5 formula with the 1st 3rd and 5th note from the major scale. I understand that if you have C7 you add the 7th note to that

Then i bumped in to 9, 11 and 13. I was confused by that because the major scale only has 7 notes...

Can anyone explain how you build those chords please?
#2
these are tension notes which go on 7 chords so basically if you have a C9 chord its really a C7 + 9th or C + G + E + Bb + D
the 9 11 and 13 are Dom 7 extensions
9 #11 and 13 are Maj7 extensions

as you can see the 9 is really the second note an octave higher

if the chord omits the 7th then it will be marked Xadd9
#3
The musical alphabet is A-G

so just keep going until

C D E F G A B C D
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

so C9 (since there is no maj or min ie Cmaj9)

its C E G Bb and D



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#4
9th chord would be a chord with 1st 3rd 5th 7th and 9th degrees of the scale. The 9th degree is really a 2nd becuz once you get to the 8th degree(octave) it starts again. and same basic principle for the 11th and 13th chords
#6
A chord is where you take a scale and play every other note. I see this as a better way to look at it than just 1st, 3rd, 5th rule alone.

so a major scale:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

The letters in bold are the chord notes. After the 7 you'll notice it goes back to the root note (or one) again, so the next other note in this chord building rule would be 2. But this looks confusing on paper, so they call it 9. Keep this every other note rule going and you'll find 11th and 13th's.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Instead of

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Which looks a little confusing.

I hope that makes sense.

In summary, chords are made by playing ever other note in the scale. They call it 9 instead of 2 because other wise it looks like that rule is being broken.

I suggest you read up more on intervals and extended intervals.
Last edited by jkielq91 at Feb 18, 2012,
#7
Quote by Stereohead
Ok thanks!

So if I'm right, the 9th degree of the A major scale would be a B


Well, sort of. The 9 of a chord with an A root would be B, but when talking about scales its common to say "the 2nd" or "the 2."


So you would say 9, 11, or 13 when talking about notes in a chord, but would probably say 2, 4, or 6 when talking about notes in a scale, or how one chord relates to another in a progression.
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#8
Quote by kaptkegan
Well, sort of. The 9 of a chord with an A root would be B, but when talking about scales its common to say "the 2nd" or "the 2."


So you would say 9, 11, or 13 when talking about notes in a chord, but would probably say 2, 4, or 6 when talking about notes in a scale, or how one chord relates to another in a progression.


Ok got it

Thanks!
#9
Also remember the 11th (or 4th) is often raised as the natural 4th usually is too dissonant.
#10
A 9th is a 2nd an octave up. An 11th is a 4th an octave up. And a 13th is a 6th, and octave up. You can basically just add or subtract 7 from each
by the time you read this you will be wasting your time because it doesnt say anything