#1
I am getting more and more serious about learning guitar everyday. I am armed with two books but I want to nail down a practice schedule to learn things instead of monkeying around undisciplined, if that makes sense.

Here is what I have so far:
5 min - Learning fretboard
- this consists of picking one note and learning every location between 0 and 12 on EADGBE. There is a program for this in one of the books I have.

15 min - Chord practice
- this consists of practicing fingering and transitions from chord to chord by choosing a progression and repeating it with chords I know already.

10 min - Alternate picking
- practice this (is this worth learning so new to guitars YET? Been playing a couple months)

I am dead serious about this. I don't merely want to be able to play my favorite bands stuff but to someday put it all together and come up with original music. Pretty ambitious I know, but it is a longterm goal.

If anyone has any suggestions I am certainly open and ready to listen. Thanks.

Edit: forgot to mention to learn a new chord a week and impliment it into chord practice.
Last edited by Killsocket at Feb 18, 2012,
#2
It's never too early to start learning alternate picking, but don't neglect economy picking. Both have their uses and are important. Also work on a bit of hybrid picking. And get a metronome and work on timing and subdivision and learn how to construct chords from scales.

If you want to become a lead player, you should also work on bends, slides, legato, hammer ons, pull offs, tapping, harmonics.

Learn some songs and improvise.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#3
This was my practice schedule when i started playing. I was playing a lot, so if you don't have enough time to do this, cut some stuff out. Also, make sure you use a metronome!
-10 minute warmup (chromatic run up and down the neck with alternate picking)
-20 minute chords
-20 minute scales (pentatonic)
-Figure out the chords to a song. I would usually do a blues, Stevie Ray Vaughn was my favorite at the time
-Figure out the lead to the song (i wouldn't play this up to speed, i would sow the song down using a software and figure it out, playing it slowly, paying attention to the notes in the scale)

I did this for a few months, then added the major scale, started getting more complicated, speeded up the metronome, etc.
#4
One crucial skill you need to develop is to train your ear. Work on listening to different intervals and train your ear to hear them and recognize them.

Also I would work on learning your scales; Major would be the best place to start. Memorize the major scale in several keys (or in all if you can). From there learn how to form chords (Major, Minor, Dominant 7th, Major 7th, etc.). It sounds complex, but it's really not that hard. Just takes a little work.
BEST GEAR IN THE WORLD

PRS Santana SE II with Dimarzio DP100 bridge P/up
BOSS ME-50
Fender Frontman 65r
Line 6 Pocket POD
Dunlop Jazz III picks
#5
Hey killsocket,
That schedule is really good. Can I suggest merging the learning the fret board and the chords together? I've found I can learn the fretboard much faster with learning chords at the same time. For example, maybe learn the 7th chord E shape, then make up a little chord progression, say G7, F#7, A7, B7 then practice going to those locations while saying the chord name out loud. That way you can learn two things at the same time.
7th chord E Shape:
Open:
http://jguitar.com/chord.gif?define=0%2C2%2C0%2C1%2C0%2C0&root=E&chord=7th

Then, as you probably already know, as you move up just bar the fret before.

Also, at the moment you have Learning the fretboard, Chord Practice, Alternate picking (absolutely worth learning now).
Say you do those three on Monday. Then, dedicate Tuesday to what the others have suggested, like interval training http://www.8notes.com/f/6_261922.asp, scales, staying in time. Maybe every three days have a rotation of something different before starting again with a small amount of time dedicated to revision of the day before. Don't forget to have songs to learn! They keep things fun and interesting.

Anyway this is really good, you will find yourself progressing really quickly if you keep up the dedication
#6
Seems good, but I think starting with scales wouldn't be too early. I'd suggest memorizing a pattern or two on CAGED scale system and practice them starting from whatever spot and saying the note name out loud. Then start to mix it up and skip notes etc. until you don't actually think of the pattern that much. Should be good practice for basic scales and notes on the fretboard.

Scale patterns are a good way to practice alternate picking too.

But one thing you've left out, accidentally hopefully, is songs. If you don't practice songs, or pieces, you're gonna hit a wall at some point. You learn so much just by practicing the songs you like, and you start to know what you really need to improve in your playing. So don't leave actual music hanging! Even at only 2 months there are hundreds of songs you can learn with a little practice.
#7
Thanks, that's a lot of info. If I break it down to this: what should I learn first? Scales or notes on fretboard? These are two different things.... Right.

I like the chromatic scale warmup with alternate picking. This will help my hand stretch out. It actually is a strain to do the first set on the 6th string.

Trying to incorporate a lot to maximize practice time.
#8
Quote by Killsocket
Thanks, that's a lot of info. If I break it down to this: what should I learn first? Scales or notes on fretboard? These are two different things.... Right.

I think you should learn the notes of the fretboard first. They do sort of go hand in hand though. Learning scales as a set of notes and intervals is kind of useless if you don't know where the notes are on the fretboard, but learning the fretboard is helpful no matter what you are doing.

Quote by Killsocket
I like the chromatic scale warmup with alternate picking. This will help my hand stretch out. It actually is a strain to do the first set on the 6th string.

By chromatic, are you talking about that 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 four fingers a row thing? If you're doing that, you should mix it up a bit. Instead of just 1 2 3 4 do something like 1 2 4 3 or 1 3 2 4 or something like that.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#9
You should read this as a starting point, you will find it usefull: http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/the-guitar-blueprint-to-success/


As for your practice schedule:

The fingerboard learning is very good, stick to it.

You might also want to learn the note values, which are very important to know (i talk about them in my ebook).

Learning chords is good, but without the proper understanding of them (how they are build, what notes they are made of and such) you will get to a point where you won't feel "inspired" and you will be frustrated.

By learning things properly you will automatically see music different, you will understand what happens and you will come with new ideas more easy.

For ear training: Take a C major scale and play it up and down and sing it while you play it. Do this for at least 15 minutes a day.

For theory you can read some of my articles in the music theory section.

Start with intervals, then scales and so on.

This is a very delicate subject and even i write 10 pages i don't think it would be enough...

So to resume thing:

Do learning the notes

Practice ear training

Learn the intervals and build from there.

You have to find a balance between music theory, ear training and guitar technique.
#10
Quote by Killsocket
I am getting more and more serious about learning guitar everyday. I am armed with two books but I want to nail down a practice schedule to learn things instead of monkeying around undisciplined, if that makes sense.

Here is what I have so far:
5 min - Learning fretboard
- this consists of picking one note and learning every location between 0 and 12 on EADGBE. There is a program for this in one of the books I have.

15 min - Chord practice
- this consists of practicing fingering and transitions from chord to chord by choosing a progression and repeating it with chords I know already.

10 min - Alternate picking
- practice this (is this worth learning so new to guitars YET? Been playing a couple months)

I am dead serious about this. I don't merely want to be able to play my favorite bands stuff but to someday put it all together and come up with original music. Pretty ambitious I know, but it is a longterm goal.

If anyone has any suggestions I am certainly open and ready to listen. Thanks.

Edit: forgot to mention to learn a new chord a week and impliment it into chord practice.


Hey buddy, I would suggest two more things: reading and playing music, playing is as much important as learning, if you wanna talk more send a message, cheers.
#12
I kind of settled on:

Chromatic warmup with alternate picking.
Chord transition practice.
Learning to read music and learn notes on fretboard (accomplishing both on notes).
Learning minor scale ( ipad app).
#13
I never set myself a schedule when i play guitar. If you keep doing the same thing every day you're gonna get frustrated and not look forward to practicing guitar, then ultimately playing the guitar will become a chore.
I never want playing guitar to be a chore for me, so when i play, i play whatever the hell i want.
#14
Quote by vayne92
I never set myself a schedule when i play guitar. If you keep doing the same thing every day you're gonna get frustrated and not look forward to practicing guitar, then ultimately playing the guitar will become a chore.
I never want playing guitar to be a chore for me, so when i play, i play whatever the hell i want.

I agree to some extent, but at the same time, if you don't set part of your time aside for structured practice, you will just end up playing things that you're comfortable with. You don't have to have a practice schedule per se, but you do have to work on your weaknesses and go through some exercises and training with a metronome to become a better player.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#15
Quote by Junior#1
I agree to some extent, but at the same time, if you don't set part of your time aside for structured practice, you will just end up playing things that you're comfortable with. You don't have to have a practice schedule per se, but you do have to work on your weaknesses and go through some exercises and training with a metronome to become a better player.


I agree that there are days where you have to sit down with a metronome and build up that speed and timing gradually,
Pretty much all your weaknesses can be overcome by just jamming to songs though. That's assuming you challenge yourself and don't stick to the same easy songs.
I for one like to challenge myself now and then with a difficult song to try and break that barrier and reach that next level up in my head.
#16
It's a good schedule as long as you can keep yourself on track. I would suggest to learn the chords and scales together. For example: when you learn a C major scale, you should also learn the C major chord in that position. What notes formed C major chord, and then Cmaj7,...etc. After a while you can work on all the chords of C major. Just to remember, it's important to know the notes on the fret as well as what notes form what chords.