#2
How long have you been playing? Don't jump into something you're not ready for.
#4
Honestly, if you already don't have an idea of what you should be teaching and have to ask an internet forum I don't think you are qualified to teach.
#5
Depending on the age of the student, see what they're already capable of, for a first lesson people always vary, I've taught people that have never picked up a guitar but have picked up the basics of playing pentatonic scales straight away and other haven't been able to play the smoke on the water riff on the low E string... start with just getting simple melodies, try nursery rhymes etc... then simple chords and songs, Knocking on Heavens Door - Bob Dylan is one I like to teach for a beginner
You could also try the Rockschool books or some form of grading system
#7
Quote by zincabopataurio
Honestly, if you already don't have an idea of what you should be teaching and have to ask an internet forum I don't think you are qualified to teach.


This. Each student is different and requires a sound judgement of their abilities to teach them correctly. Are you going to teach every student basic chords? Probably not because they will all be in differing technical ability and knowledge.
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#8
You will learn everyday, and a large percentage (20-50%) of your students will quit, maybe even more. Don't take it personally! Guitar is a very difficult instrument to learn, and the strings are hard to push down. If I recall it can take up to 17 lbs of pressure to play certain notes!

(don't quote me on that, lol)

Girls have more difficulty in general than boys because the instrument tears up their hands and they may (probably do) have fingernails that will have to go, etc. Not saying girls can't play...

Ani DiFranco =

...there is a bit more challenge for them, though, and boys have probably played sports and have stronger muscles in the hands. It just may take a bit more patience and positive encouragement on your part, especially with younger (<12 or 13) girls. After menarche (yes, their period!) they will either be on board with it and just as good (usually better!) than boys, but they may also be totally not receptive to it as well.

As you can see teaching is COMPLEX! It is highly satisfying and fun, and will make you a LOT better player!

As for what to teach: let the student decide. Ask questions, "What are you interested in playing?" and "What type of music do you like?" and so on.

If someone comes right out and says "Dream Theater" then you know they are receptive to scales and theory and soloing, etc. If you get, "Uh, I don't know," then your job is a lot harder!!

By default choose a good book you teach out of. A lot of people use Mel Bay's, but I find it TOO HARD (hell, I struggle with Method Book 1!! Lol)

Aura Lee = AAAAAHHHH!!!!

Choose something that is pretty easy. Use this for kids as well as adults, and choose certain songs every lesson: one that is easy, one that is moderately difficult, but that you expect they should be able to play, and one relatively hard one. You might tell them, "Now this one is hard and I don't expect you to play it next time, but if you are up to the challenge it's there for you!"

A lot of 'em will surprise you!

That's the best feeling in the world. Well, one of 'em anyway.

Most challenging students?

Small children whose PARENTS want them to play. (I have told many of these students to just please do themselves and their parents a favor and QUIT!!! It's a waste of time and money if the child is not invested in the process.)

Adolescents in that "Meh" stage. We've all been there...

"What do you want for dinner?"
"I don't care."
"What do you think of that new girl in class?"
"I don't care."
"What do you think about all the rape and social disparity happening in the Sudan?"
"I don't care."

...you get the picture!!! Those folks take utmost patience and encouragement, BUT they will get over it believe me. If you can just stick it out until that ever-so-annoying stage is over you may have one of the best students ever.

Many of mine turned out that way: annoying at first, but AWESOME guitarists now. Better than me!

...the other best feeling in the world!
#9
Quote by The.new.guy
I've been playing for 9 years. I feel as though I have the knowledge to teach someone. I was just curious.


Teaching someone isn't about how much you know so much as how well you can communicate it to another human being. You need to have a high level of understanding which is not the same as knowledge at all.

I also agree with zincabopataurio, if you don't know what you need to do to teach then you shouldn't be teaching.
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Quote by Master Foo
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Legion.
#10
Quote by The.new.guy
...Any tips? I mean, obviously, start from the basics. E, D, C, A, and G chords etc., but are there any things I should try to avoid or topics I should stress? Thanks in advanced.


What kind of time scale are you giving yourself to prepare for this?
#11
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Teaching someone isn't about how much you know so much as how well you can communicate it to another human being. You need to have a high level of understanding which is not the same as knowledge at all.

QT motherfukken T

The best teachers are the ones who help you make connections between abstract ideas and actual application.

If you don't know what you'd teach them, you're probably not yet ready to take on that challenge. That said, your first lesson with your first student is the toughest one in a lot of ways regardless of how much preparation you've done. It's a little nerve wracking to have someone trust you and expect what you teach to be 100% true, at least for me.

If you want to teach guitar, I'd recommend experimenting by teaching a friend in your spare time and seeing how it feels to you. One thing that works really well for me is to spend the first lesson finding out what precisely my student wants to learn so that I can build a lesson plan specific to him that highlights the things that he wants to learn. That way, you have an outline of what to touch on in your lessons for the first few weeks or month.
#12
Quote by zincabopataurio
Honestly, if you already don't have an idea of what you should be teaching and have to ask an internet forum I don't think you are qualified to teach.

This is why they're going to be free, but I certainly understand where everyone is coming from with this. Thanks for all the advice, guys!
#14
Honestly teaching guitar can help you a lot.

From experience i came to the conclusion that you have to know exactly what to teach them.

First of all ask the question:

What are your goals with guitar playing ?

A: If he says he want to write songs, be in a band and become better and better start learning him the fundamentals:

- the guitar notes, exercises for learning them

- learn them theory : what is an intervals, scale, chords etc.

- teach them to combine theory, guitar technique and ear training

B: If he says he wants to play for fun you can show him the chords and learn them some songs.

Everybody is different and you should adapt to them.

But generally every student is in one of those 2 categories : for fun or serious business.
#15
I dont think it is very difficult to teach people at all. After your first lesson, you should already know what songs/artists they want to play and just teach them what it takes to play that. They need a reason to love the guitar, as simple as that.

I taught a 9 year old girl this last summer, and she was going to quit after the first lesson, but her mom made her try one more time, and in 2 months she was playing all her favorite taylor swift songs. Sure, I didn't really want to learn them, but I am glad I did, because now she is a rocking lil guitarist and I only had to teach her about 5 chords.
#16
Quote by The.new.guy
...Any tips? I mean, obviously, start from the basics. E, D, C, A, and G chords etc., but are there any things I should try to avoid or topics I should stress? Thanks in advanced.

Hey buudy, that depends about how much of the instrument you master, and the student that's going to take lessons with you. Let's say you pick a student which doesn't play at all, you can strat teaching picking exercises, finger exercises, then basic chords and progressions, and so on, cheers.
#17
i can't believe no one has suggested teaching the basics of reading music...oh, wait, we're guitarists. that's right.

seriously. teach them how to read music. even if they never get to the point of sight reading, give them the skill that so many guitarists lack -- the ability to look at a piece of paper without numbers on lines and make sense of it. guitarists who can read music can make sense of music written for any instrument. guitarists who can read only tabulature can make sense of music written for the guitar (and instruments tuned similarly, which are, in the grand scheme of things, very few).

the best musical training emphasizes good musicianship in general, the factors of which include but are not limited to:

- ear training
- music theory
- reading musical notation
- good instrumental technique

when you find a student, ask them what they want out of playing guitar. if it's a hobby, they don't really need to be able to do anything other than read tabulature and fret notes. but if they really want to get serious, you should be able to provide them with these things.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#18
One thing you're going to learn early is that everyone learns differently and everyone has different styles and tendencies. The best way to figure out how to deal with all of those things is through experience. I recommend only teaching the basics at first so that you can get comfortable as a teacher, and then expand your teaching horizons over time.
#19
Quote by The.new.guy
...Any tips? I mean, obviously, start from the basics. E, D, C, A, and G chords etc., but are there any things I should try to avoid or topics I should stress? Thanks in advanced.

Obviously? Sure, basic chords if you are teaching songs. But you need a different approach if you're going to be teaching music.

There have been many books written on how to teach guitar, phycological concepts of learning, and many other things that need to be considered.

If you're serious about teaching, that's great...but put some time into researching teaching methods and their effectiveness. Your students will thank you.
#20
Quote by Geldin

If you want to teach guitar, I'd recommend experimenting by teaching a friend in your spare time and seeing how it feels to you. One thing that works really well for me is to spend the first lesson finding out what precisely my student wants to learn so that I can build a lesson plan specific to him that highlights the things that he wants to learn. That way, you have an outline of what to touch on in your lessons for the first few weeks or month.


This is huge. Find a friend that you normally hang out with who is interested in a slightly different style of music than you. Offer to teach them for free and to be a guinea pig.

Doing something along those lines can really let you know several things:

1) Can I handle teaching?
2) Am I able to convey points to my student?
3) Do I like teaching (this is the most important)?

Also, consider the fact that you might end up working one-on-one with a complete stranger. Some people get weirded out by being in close quarters with a stranger. On the same subject, you will develop really great relationships with your students, and watching their skill levels and confidence grow are two of the coolest things I've ever experienced.

Just my two cents.
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#21
My two main advices for my students who want to start teaching:

1) Don't try to teach things you barely know even when you really like them, you don't want insecurity that may lead to a bad reputation.

2) Don't charge the lessons very cheap "Because you're a junior teacher". It's true, having a reasonable price can help you get more pupils quickly, but someone who does not pay a fair price may not practice. Which leads to your pupils not improving. Which makes you stand as a bad teacher. So have committed people paying you the money you deserve.
It would be interesting to hear other opinions about this one!

Greetings, Mariano
#22
I am currently writing out lessons starting for folks that have never touched an instrument before. The lessons structure kinda goes like this: lemme know what y'all think, and TS maybe this might help you a bit?
anyways

The Guitar - explaining the components and terminology of the guitar as to help for later on in the lessons so you don't have to explain a bunch of stuff as you go. and reading tabs and chord charts etc...

The Open Major Chords
Followed by exercises im recording

Than I'm going into basic Music theory : the notes themselves, the octave, beats, timing, the very basic stuff

Than I go into variation of the open chords, Mins, Sus, 2nd, 7ths.
And I'm recording excercises for those

Than I go into a little bit more music theory, explaining Majors vs Minors, Numbering the Notes, Key, etc..

After all that I go into Bar Chords and Power Chords

Then I move into strumming patterns, and note articulation, like palm muting n such
and I've got excercises and songs recorded for that

Than I go on to Pentatonic Scales
Alternate Picking and a bunch of recorded excercises for that
More Not articulation, bends, vibratos, artificial harmonics, natural harmonics, hammer on's and pull offs.
and I've got a bunch of exercises, and a solo ontop of a rhythm background recorded.

Now I'm at Minor notes in teh Pentatonic scales, and common riffs associated with those and related exercises

next I am going to move into moving the Pentatonics for the Major, and same as above, common riffs and exercises

I think from there I wanna go on to different methods of picking, but I'm not quite sure. I've tought lessons before, so I know what I've got so far will last me quite some time, especially with the lower age groups, but I eventually want to build a book to start from the beginning and progress all the way to where My skill level is at (and hopefully I'll continue to improve so I can keep writing!) and I'm recording all of the steps and exercises along the way so students can read and practice from their book and hear what right sounds like (Mostly cause thats how I learned) while they are not at practice.

If you guys see any holes in my lessons, have suggestions, critique, etc...lemme know, and TS I hope this was helpful!
#23
Quote by Floss Ninja

Most challenging students?

Small children whose PARENTS want them to play. (I have told many of these students to just please do themselves and their parents a favor and QUIT!!! It's a waste of time and money if the child is not invested in the process.)

Adolescents in that "Meh" stage. We've all been there...

"What do you want for dinner?"
"I don't care."
"What do you think of that new girl in class?"
"I don't care."
"What do you think about all the rape and social disparity happening in the Sudan?"
"I don't care."

...you get the picture!!! Those folks take utmost patience and encouragement, BUT they will get over it believe me. If you can just stick it out until that ever-so-annoying stage is over you may have one of the best students ever.

Many of mine turned out that way: annoying at first, but AWESOME guitarists now. Better than me!

...the other best feeling in the world!


+1