#1
hey guys has a question.

U know the whole tonic - pre dominant - dominant chord progression?

am i able to apply this in soloing? For example starting off on the tonic or root note, messing around with predominant notes and ending in a dominant note, then coming back to the tonic?

Trying to find ways to make my solo's more interesting..
#2
Yes, and if it works it works. That's the beauty about making music, you can make it work any way you want and it doesn't have to exactly follow a formula.
NOT EASILY LED, EASILY BANNED.
#3
Quote by IbanezMan989
hey guys has a question.

U know the whole tonic - pre dominant - dominant chord progression?

am i able to apply this in soloing? For example starting off on the tonic or root note, messing around with predominant notes and ending in a dominant note, then coming back to the tonic?

Trying to find ways to make my solo's more interesting..

Absolutely. Focus on guide tones.
#4
Quote by IbanezMan989
hey guys has a question.

U know the whole tonic - pre dominant - dominant chord progression?

am i able to apply this in soloing? For example starting off on the tonic or root note, messing around with predominant notes and ending in a dominant note, then coming back to the tonic?

Trying to find ways to make my solo's more interesting..

What exactly is your goal or focus in using that approach?

What's the chord progression to begin with? What's the original melody? Focus on what the song has to offer by itself before anything else. Work out a one position arpeggio study of the changes...learn the melody in a bunch of different positions.
#5
well useally i just played it by ear when to come home in a solo. but now i use both what i said and what i said in the post. It just seems if i make V or vii the note before the root right before i finish a phrase itll work better or that when i start hitting the note ill finish up the phrase going down some sub dominant and ending with the root
#6
Ok, I see what you're saying now. I'd agree that the approach is valid, but there may be easier ways of achievable similar, and better results.

Have you tried thinking in terms of each chord as it appears in the progression? Knowing the scale that fits all the chords it the first tier of understanding. Thinking in terms of the chords themselves is the next tier.

Think of the scale as the skeleton, and the arpeggios as the meat. By "playing the changes" or outlining the chords you're playing over, as opposed to mindlessly swimming around the scale, you'll find a lot of those lines (7 to 1) sort of present themselves in the chord tones.

If I had something like C-F-G7-C. Over the G7, if I really try organize my lines around the notes of the chord itself (G B D F) I can find a lot of nice, perhaps cheesy, resolution to C (I). B resolving up to C. F resolving down to E.

These kinds of smooth and logical movements exist if you just pay attention to how the chord tones can move between each other as the chords change.
Last edited by chronowarp at Feb 19, 2012,
#7
Try this scale over dominant chords and their variations(7/b9, 7/#9, 7/#5, 7/#11), you're gonna find some new and cool sounds.