#1
I think the fretboard is starting to look kinda wrong on my Furch guitar, what do you think?





Last edited by ZoaL at Feb 19, 2012,
#2
lemon oil. itl make is look good as new... and really dark. check my strat link in my sig to see how dark a rosewood fretboard can be after a nice oiling.

EDIT: picture 2 looks like your neck might be twisting... it could just be a weird angle, but, if it is, that will require some professional work.
Last edited by ciano16 at Feb 19, 2012,
#3
I think it looks fine personally, but you can get lemon oil from most guitar/music stores. Check out some guides on the internet on how to apply it (although it'll probably come with instructions anyway).
#4
I just think that i looks kinda ruff with all them spots all around it, i have heard stories about dry fretboards cracking before :P!

Can Lemonoil make it look more like an average highend guitar fretboard ? :P
#5
Save yourself some money, for the same price as a bottle of lemon oil you can buy a lifetime supply of plain linseed oil.
I'm the only player to be sponsered by 7 guitar companies not to use their products.
#6
yeah pretty much. the more worn it is, the more the lemon oil can do for it. it should also be oiled regularly afterwards. i oil my guitar once ever 3 or so months. basically when the seasons change. even old guitars i never use get a yearly oiling. i havent played my cheap bc rich KKV in years, but i oil it every fall before it gets cold and dry just because the guitar means a lot to me and i want it to last forever.
#7
Quote by BlackbirdPie
Save yourself some money, for the same price as a bottle of lemon oil you can buy a lifetime supply of plain linseed oil.


i have to disagree. i bought a 4oz bottle of jim dunlop formula 65 3 years ago for 5 dollars. as i said, i oild my guitar once every 3 months, and, although the bottle says "a little goes a long way" i prefer to drench my fretboard in it, so i use a lot. ive probably oiled over 30 guitars in total with it and i still have 1/3 of the bottle. ive even oiled some padauk wood projects like an entire cajon(basically the surface area of 20 fretboards) and my pickguard and headstock veneer before laquering(you can see them in my sig).

tl;dr = money should never be an issue with lemon oil, but it is a matter of opinion. maybe you should try all the oils: tung, linseed, flax, lemon, and mineral. ive even heard of coconut oil on fretboards.
#8
Quote by ciano16
.....[ ]....l. ive even heard of coconut oil on fretboards.


As long as you don't put this into your body. It'll clog your arteries big time... Tropical oil, you know.
#9
Quote by ciano16
i have to disagree. i bought a 4oz bottle of jim dunlop formula 65 3 years ago for 5 dollars. as i said, i oild my guitar once every 3 months, and, although the bottle says "a little goes a long way" i prefer to drench my fretboard in it, so i use a lot. ive probably oiled over 30 guitars in total with it and i still have 1/3 of the bottle. ive even oiled some padauk wood projects like an entire cajon(basically the surface area of 20 fretboards) and my pickguard and headstock veneer before laquering(you can see them in my sig).

tl;dr = money should never be an issue with lemon oil, but it is a matter of opinion. maybe you should try all the oils: tung, linseed, flax, lemon, and mineral. ive even heard of coconut oil on fretboards.



Using basic math, according to rate of use, you will run out before 2014, unless you get hit by a bolt of lightning within the next couple of years, by definition, it will be within your life time.

There is a very good reason why some brands of lemon oil have "Caution - do not use on maple fretboards" printed on the label. The stuff sold for fretboards is made up of a mix of mineral oil and lemon oil, one of lemon oils various ingredients is B-limonene, which can be a strong solvent used for things, like removing paint and lacquer. Granted, since it's mostly made up of mineral oil, putting it on your fretboard won't make your neck instantly dissolve in a cloud of smoke, but over time, by tranference from your fingers, it may cause the finish on your guitars to soften.

Raw linseed oil is recommended by both Don Taylor (Taylor Guitars) and Dan Erlewine.
I'm the only player to be sponsered by 7 guitar companies not to use their products.
Last edited by BlackbirdPie at Feb 19, 2012,
#10
Quote by BlackbirdPie
...[ ]...There is a very good reason why some brands of lemon oil have "Caution - do not use on maple fretboards" printed on the label. ...[ ]....


I though that many maple fret boards were finished anyway. If true mineral oil would just bounce off it.

"Murphy's Lemon Oil", is a product allegedly to also be used in maintaining furniture finishes. However, it will just pretty much smear and finally bounce off a "closed coat finish" such as polyurethane.

Since rosewood fret boards aren't typically finished, that's what permits the absorption of the "lemon oil".

I suspect if a player is cleaning the strings thoroughly, (as they should after playing), the rags is probably leeching much of the oil back out of the board rather quickly.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 19, 2012,
#11
Maple fretboards are extremely rare on acoustic guitars because they don't wear as well on acoustic guitars.

Lemon oil or mineral oil should be perfectly find on the fretboard. Do it about twice a year and it'll stay nice and hydrated.
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#12
Quote by captivate
Maple fretboards are extremely rare on acoustic guitars because they don't wear as well on acoustic guitars..
Since maple is used for bowling alleys due to its hardness, it would be interesting to understand why the softer rosewood would wear better....

I had thought it was a question of tonality. Then too, there's always the harder, denser, ebony for an more upscale instrument.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 20, 2012,
#13
Quote by BlackbirdPie
Using basic math, according to rate of use, you will run out before 2014, unless you get hit by a bolt of lightning within the next couple of years, by definition, it will be within your life time.

There is a very good reason why some brands of lemon oil have "Caution - do not use on maple fretboards" printed on the label. The stuff sold for fretboards is made up of a mix of mineral oil and lemon oil, one of lemon oils various ingredients is B-limonene, which can be a strong solvent used for things, like removing paint and lacquer. Granted, since it's mostly made up of mineral oil, putting it on your fretboard won't make your neck instantly dissolve in a cloud of smoke, but over time, by tranference from your fingers, it may cause the finish on your guitars to soften.

Raw linseed oil is recommended by both Don Taylor (Taylor Guitars) and Dan Erlewine.



it says not to use on maple fretboards because they are finished and using any kind of oil on a poly finish would be completely pointless. i even use lemon oil on my satin finish strat body as it is recommended by fender. also, i may have forgotten to make the actual point, but i was trying to say that over a lifetime, youd probably only save like 20 dollars getting linseed instead of lemon oil. thats less than a penny a week. his fretboard is very obviously unfinished, so he doesnt have to worry about it dissolving anything.
#14
Quote by Captaincranky
Since maple is used for bowling alleys due to its hardness, it would be interesting to understand why the softer rosewood would wear better....

I had thought it was a question of tonality. Then too, there's always the harder, denser, ebony for an more upscale instrument.


rosewood is much harder than maple. bowling alleys arent made of rosewood because that would cost insane amounts of money. also, rosewood, being much denser, would crack instead of bend. thats why bowling alleys are made of maple and not rosewood(or any super dense hardwood) maple fretboards only sound brighter because they are lacquered, which basically fills in any holes on the finish, making it technically more dense. by contrast, jazz hollowbody guitar bodies are made of maple because it mellows out the sound more than a super hard wood. for the mellowest sound, its rosewood fretboard and hollow maple body.