#1
Hey all. I've been playing the verse progression to The Grouch by Green Day in all open (A-E-A-D-A-E-D-E and the rest) on my new Squier Affinity Strat (still a beginner) and the A and E strings ring through and mess up the sound when I change from E back to A or from E or A to D. I don't really want to invert the chords especially in this case because it sounds like crap. My hands are barely big enough to fit my thumb onto the E string while fingering the A open, unless I use my ring finger to barre the frets and even then it's awkward and doesn't always allow all the notes to ring out properly. I don't think I can even begin to fit it around the E and the A strings while fingering the D properly either. I talked to my uncle who played rhythm in a few bands and he reckons I can use my right hand to mute the E and A strings when necessary while strumming the chords. It certainly takes practice but I'm able to do this. So I wanted to check with you guys that this is considered proper technique and won't screw my playing up somewhere down the track, and hear your opinion on muting the strings.

Cheers.
#2
Just practice the progression way slower and "tap" the strings with the side of your hand (that you use for a palm mute). Like practice hitting those non-needed strings (the E on an A chord, E & A on a D chord, etc) on the first downstroke of the switch. So if it's E to D for example, on the downstroke for D you'd actually hit the E and A strings with your palm and then D, G, B, e with the pick, but all in one stroke. I probably just made it sound way more complicated than it is lol, but just start slow and gradually speed it up until you're playing full spied and don't even notice your using the technique.

Look into percussive techniques on Acoustic. it's basically like that except you aren't muting ALL the strings on the downstroke.

That may not be "proper technique" (or it may, who knows, I'm self-taught so I'm no master lol), but it's what works for me.

Great song (and band) by the way. I love the bassline in that song.
"Space may be the final frontier
But it's made in a hollywood basement."
#3
Keep your thumb behind the neck. The only times it should be over the neck is when doing bends or vibrato or some chords where it's necessary.

Use palm muting to mute the strings in this case. Some things will need left hand muting instead, but that is not done with your thumb, but with your other fingers.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#4
Quote by Agent51
Just practice the progression way slower and "tap" the strings with the side of your hand (that you use for a palm mute). Like practice hitting those non-needed strings (the E on an A chord, E & A on a D chord, etc) on the first downstroke of the switch. So if it's E to D for example, on the downstroke for D you'd actually hit the E and A strings with your palm and then D, G, B, e with the pick, but all in one stroke. I probably just made it sound way more complicated than it is lol, but just start slow and gradually speed it up until you're playing full spied and don't even notice your using the technique.

Look into percussive techniques on Acoustic. it's basically like that except you aren't muting ALL the strings on the downstroke.

That may not be "proper technique" (or it may, who knows, I'm self-taught so I'm no master lol), but it's what works for me.

Great song (and band) by the way. I love the bassline in that song.


yeah I wasn't sure if I should keep them muted or just damp the unwanted strings as I strum the chord. I know what you mean here. thanks guys.