#1
I've finally decided to stop being a knucklehead and I'm starting to implement a metronome into my practice. I really want to get my speed and accuracy up. The problem is that I can't seem to play along with one the right way. I've been playing so long with out a metronome that I cant even find my average speed. How exactly would I practice scales, arpeggios, or sequencing scales with a metronome? I can't get in sync with one, and it makes me feel like I'm learning guitar all over again.
Trust me, I'm a Jedi.

Quote by Minkaro
You must control your use of the force, young Trizek.
#2
Start real basic. You should pick it up quickly enough.

Lower your expectations. You're learning something new, after all.
#3
I've started using a metronome not so long ago after years of playing (although pretty casually) without one.
I didn't have much problem playing scales and chord progressions along with the metronome, since they are pretty easy to play, and you know what you're gonna play in advance.
If you do struggle with those, I suggest start really slow...? isn't that the solution to pretty much anything? I know it feels lame and boring to do it, but if it's the only way..

I still can't improvise along with a metronome, but I haven't practiced in either, so...

In general, I wouldn't advise playing with a metronome when you're learning something completely new, like a new song or a new scale. First get comfortable with it played slowly and at whatever tempo you you want, and then start playing it, again slowly as a start, with the metronome.
It's an idea that I came up with on my own and works for me, but if any of the more experienced players here would tell you why that's a bad idea, you should probably listen to them.
"Yeees I am your god!" John Petrucci, Phsyco excercises
#4
Avielp the idea is good.

First get familiar with the lick scale or whatever you want to learn.

If you ar trying to learn a tab see what are the note values (if you have a guitar pro tab) if not try to play the lick in 8th notes or even 4th notes if you are a begginer.


You can read a guide about using the metronome in chapter 3 in my free ebook :

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/the-guitar-blueprint-to-success/

I advise you to use the metronome in all your practice routines.

When is was starting out the metronome was of no big importance to me but with time i found out that all good guitar players have a steady rhythm.

The not values are the fundamentals of music and you should learn them by heart.

You have to get to the point where you what's going on in a piece of music rhytmicaly and then musically ( i mean intervals, scales etc. )

I once talked to someone who was playing violin for 30 years and i asked him what was the most important thing he would reccomand me he said : RHYTM !!

Here is the link again to the free ebook, you might find it useful , i recommend that you read all the chapters:

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/the-guitar-blueprint-to-success/

Good luck !
#5
Thanks for all the replies everyone I appreciate them all. Thanks for the e-book Apajr it looks very promising. I'm still open to everyone's suggestions.
Trust me, I'm a Jedi.

Quote by Minkaro
You must control your use of the force, young Trizek.
#6
Practice tapping your foot at a constant speed so you get a natural feel for it. Start slow and work your way up. Don't expect to start at 210 BPM and nail every solo you know.
#7
Quote by Trizek
I've finally decided to stop being a knucklehead and I'm starting to implement a metronome into my practice. I really want to get my speed and accuracy up. The problem is that I can't seem to play along with one the right way. I've been playing so long with out a metronome that I cant even find my average speed. How exactly would I practice scales, arpeggios, or sequencing scales with a metronome? I can't get in sync with one, and it makes me feel like I'm learning guitar all over again.

Hey buddy, don't worry, this is normal, you must practice a little bit to get used to it, some of my students have this problems too, and I say the same thing to them, and usually it solves the problem, start it really slow and fasten the tempo the same way, slowly, send me a message in the case you wanna talk a little more, cheers.
#8
Oh, another thing I struggled with and found a solution to:
When I first started playing with the metronome, it felt like somebody was whipping me to keep up with him. I sort of struggled with the metronome beats and it felt unnatural and annoying.
But then at some point I learned to ride the beat and actually use it to play with more...feeling (can't find the right word to descrive that). I started to play with the rhythm instead of struggling to keep up with it.

A way to apply this transition might be to really feel and play the accents.

All that would probably sound like a vague blabber to anyone who hasn't experienced it, but it was an important breakthrough for me, and if it helps anyone, it was worth mentioning.
"Yeees I am your god!" John Petrucci, Phsyco excercises